Whole Plant Technologies Unveils “Savy” New Brand

OREGON: Whole Plant Technologies today introduced the company’s new corporate brand and website. The branding reflects both the launch of the company as well as its vision for the future. The launch is well-timed with the first run of the company’s patented Grow Tray System, which is now available for purchase and installation. Whole Plant Technologies worked with Bend, Oregon-based digital marketing agency, Savy, to design its brand and website.

“We’re excited to introduce our new brand and website in conjunction with the sales of our patented Grow Tray System,” says Jody Testaberg, Founder and CEO of Whole Plant Technologies. “We’ve been working diligently to develop our system through four patented prototypes. Our brand reflects the simplicity, value and sustainability that comes from using the Whole Plant Technologies Grow Tray System.”

tray-system_2Data collected using the Grow Tray System in several commercial harvests shows the cultivation of cannabis and agricultural crops using the Whole Plant Grow Tray System produces higher yields and faster harvests, maximizing profits while growing crops sustainably with zero drain-to-waste. The Grow Tray System from Whole Plant Technologies is a hydroponic/aeroponic hybridized system with trays that are now available for purchase. Whole Plant Technologies offers installation and service plans with the Grow Tray System, as well as consultation services.

In addition to its commercial product line, Whole Plant Technologies supports awareness and continued cannabis research towards the health benefits associated with the use of the whole cannabis plant. For additional information, visit www.wholeplanttechnologies.com

Farmer Tom Calls For A Safer Cannabis Workplace

WASHINGTON: Tom Lauerman, universally known as “Farmer Tom,” is a well-known and beloved figure in Washington’s cannabis community.  Attend any cannabis event in the Evergreen State – from farmer’s market to the steps of the Statehouse in Olympia – and you are likely to see Farmer Tom – long flowing Santa beard and floppy hippie hat – front and center representing the cause.

image-2

The Feds Visit A Cannabis Farm

These days, when he’s not working with his business partners on an upcoming line of “organic” soils and nutrients, Farmer Tom can be heard espousing the benefits of establishing best practices and standards for the cannabis  industry – advocating for everything from safer pest management and testing practices to the rights of his fellow workers in weed.

ft today we farm logo

Farmer Tom is a pioneer in working with the Federal Government to create workplace safety standards for the cannabis industry. Last fall, he and his wife Paul invited the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to visit his medical marijuana farm in Vancouver, WA.  The feds spent several days on the farm reviewing for the first time the working conditions on a real cannabis farm.  The visit garnered quite a bit of attention for the media-friendly Farmer Tom, including a feature in this month’s DOPE Magazine.

ft snake oil

I Don’t Make Snake Oil

Workplace safety “runs in the family” for Farmer Tom. “My Grandfather was head of HR at both Republic Steel and Covair and was on the first national safety commission,” Lauerman told MJ News Network.  “I handled OSHA paperwork and meetings while in the corporate world and worked with the Union drafting a workplace health and safety manual.”

As part of his mission to raise awareness of safety issues among leaders of the legal cannabis industry, Farmer Tom will be a featured presenter at a “Cannabis Industry Safety Night” panel discussion on May 26th, an event sponsored by the MJBA Portland, and CannaGuard Security.   Joining Tom will be environmental, health & safety expert Sally Koch, Indy Safety; Paul Equall, Life Safety Corp; and Mike Sotelo, CEO of Consolidar Networks.

Federal agents studied cannabis workplace safety at Farmer Tom's

Tools of the Trade

Farmer Tom has plans to publish a cannabis workplace health and safety manual soon. “I’m working with a few groups developing workplace health and safety standards,” he explained, “and have been approached by Washington state university on doing continued research in the Cannabis world.”

Stay tuned here.

 

 

 

Growing Sustainable Profits With Cannabis

Dr. Richard Freeman, Ph.D.

We’re hearing the word “sustainable” a lot these days. It’s coming from activists and journalists, from politicians and the marketing agents, writers, anyone in public life. I hear it talking with friends. Sustainable agriculture, sustainable development, and sustainable living – I certainly use the word, myself.

So, when I use the term “sustainable,” I try to maintain a clear understanding of what I mean. And, really, it’s pretty straightforward. If we can keep doing it the way we’re doing it year after year, generation after generation, without running out of resources and trashing our living environment, then it’s sustainable. The details can add a world of nuance, but that’s the basic idea.

Growing cannabis sustainably means growing plants in ways that will keep working in the short term and long term while returning a profit. Sustainable business models work in the natural environment AND perform on the bottom-line. If we’re growing Cannabis and we’re doing it sustainably, then we’re going to stay in business, by definition.

Sustainable growing can reduce costs in the long-term and short-term, grow the kindest quality product, and sustain and preserve health in our own living environment. It benefits the growers, the consumers, and pretty much everyone else. Sustainability offers us a win-win-win situation. Assessing an operation for sustainability begins with analyzing energy-use and materials-consumption in the working environment, equipment and materials, and horticultural methods. And, it requires analyzing associated production costs. In assessing equipment and materials, direct impact on ecosystems is part of the picture, but so is “embodied energy” – the energy required to create these items.

Assessing methods means understanding how our growing techniques affect our environment. Are they life sustaining? Are they a source of throw-away costs? Do they degrade the quality of our goods? Sustainable responses include increasing efficiencies and “closing loops,” which both cut costs. If we can produce an equal or superior product for less money, then profits increase. If we save money by using super-efficient lighting without sacrificing quality and pay for the investment with the savings within a reasonable time frame, then why not? Closing loops means local-sourcing and re-using materials whenever we can – for instance recycling our bio-abundant soil mixes and composting vegetative residues (fan leaves and root balls) into valuable soil amendments. Or, closing loops could include developing nature’s “environmental services,” such as encouraging insects that kill pests. With some imaginative thinking and a little number crunching, we can pick the low-hanging fruit and benefit immediately.

When it comes to benefiting, who can argue with cutting costs, especially when the outcome includes better quality and value in the product? As the market becomes savvy to the benefits of healthy-grown plants – including the taste benefits – the value of sustainably grown Cannabis can only rise. People can taste fertilizer salts, and they can taste pesticides. Anyone who has tasted high-quality organic flowers will never go back to “chem pot” and they’ll pay premium for the good stuff. The same holds true for folks who eat herbal products or rub creams on their skin. As lab testing becomes the standard (and it will), the ability to detect chemical residues will improve. People will be able to tell the difference. And smell the difference. And customers will start asking for the good stuff. Sustainable, indeed.

In future posts, we’ll offer some more detail on ways to close the loops and increase efficiencies – and ways to grow Cannabis that maximize the benefits of good plant genetics while producing outstanding flowers.

‘Clean Green’-Labeled Marijuana Is Pesticide-Free, Environmentally Friendlier

WASHINGTON: Chris Van Hook bent over a shrub-sized marijuana plant at Mountain High Farm with a magnifying glass last month, looking for imperfections in the fan-shaped leaves.

A few of the fronds were “chewed on,” which is what Van Hook expects in a pesticide-free crop.

Pot grown at the state-licensed operation can’t be certified as organic because the U.S. Department of Agriculture doesn’t recognize marijuana as a legal crop. Advertising it as organic would be a federal labeling violation, inviting hefty fines.

But if Mountain High passes Van Hook’s inspection, the Stevens County farm can advertise its product under the “Clean Green” label, an alternate certification Van Hook developed for pot growers touting the naturalness of their product.