New MyJane Study: Majority of Orange County Women Would Consider Cannabis to Treat Stress, Sleep Issues and Pain

CALIFORNIA:  Seventy-nine percent of women surveyed in Orange County, California, agree that their most common health and wellness issues can be addressed with cannabis products, according to a just-released survey conducted by San Diego-based research firm GroupSolver for MyJane in advance of its launch. The survey also revealed the state of Orange County cannabis usage, documenting that up to 40 percent of Orange County respondents who experience stress and anxiety, sleep issues or pain turn to cannabis for relief.

However, approximately 30 percent of recreational or medicinal cannabis users feel uncomfortable purchasing through a dispensary, with 79 percent of respondents expressing interest in trying a curated cannabis subscription service just for women. The survey reached out to 42,000 women in Orange County who met qualification criteria and had a margin of error of less than 5 percent with a confidence level of 90 percent.

These findings reveal a gap in cannabis education and accessibility in Orange County, according to MyJane founder and CEO Kimberly Kovacs, and signal that women want alternatives. She and a founding team of entrepreneurs — Chief Technology Officer Ryan Reid, Chief Scientist Cam Woods and Chief Creative Officer Cara Stewart Raffele — are dedicated to closing this gap and helping women feel better.

“Through MyJane, women will be empowered to take control of their personal wellness, create routines proven to work for them, and reject the idea that one size fits all in health and wellness,” Kovacs said. “Through education, accessibility and community, we will offer women the confidence to make informed health and wellness choices about cannabis.”

Kovacs will be one of the featured investor sharks at the Arcview International Investor Forum in San Francisco, July 19-21, 2018.

Launching in fall 2018, MyJane will offer the first premium cannabis subscription service for women — tailored to meet their individual needs. The software platform is being designed to provide comprehensive research and education to ensure members always are in control of their wellness decisions, helping them create personalized routines just right for them. MyJane’s proprietary algorithm uses artificial intelligence to personalize health and wellness choices. The data collected will drive product choices, improve members’ experiences and add social proof to the void of useful data in the cannabis market.

Women In Pot Business Gather In Bend, Oregon

OREGON:  Lisa Page, a former Dairy Queen manager in Missoula, Montana, recently moved to Central Oregon, after a short stint in New Jersey, to grow marijuana for Lunchbox Alchemy, a Bend business run by her daughter and son-in-law.

Page and her partner bought 30 acres near Alfalfa and plan on putting in a crop, she said. The marijuana they intend to grow will be processed, the active ingredients extracted and turned into medicinal products.

“We’re just going to do our best to grow the different strains of marijuana,” said Page, 61. “When David, (her partner), and I came out, we asked point blank, ‘what is the part of your business holding you back?’

“Supply,” was the answer.

Page and her daughter, Ashlie Yee, 35, were among about 40 people, mostly women, at the first local gathering Thursday of Women Grow, a nationwide group of women marijuana entrepreneurs.

 

The Secret Ways Women Used Pot Throughout History

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  Ever wondered what it would feel like to slather a mixture of lamb’s fat and cannabis all over your naked body? The sensation was a familiar one to European women, once upon a time.

While the U.S. is only now starting to explore modern medical uses of marijuana, for centuries, women around the world have harnessed the magical green leaves to relieve pain, make sex better, and even attempt to manage STDs. The jury is still out on how safe and effective these remedies were, but perhaps they’ll inspire new research into cannabis’ potential today.

Here’s a quick tour through pot’s lesser-known history with the ladies.

Women rubbed pot on swollen breasts.

Weed has been used as a topical treatment for centuries. Back in the eleventh century, women used it to treat swollen breasts. The Old English Herbarium described the process as follows: “Rub [the herb] with fat, lay it to the breast, it will disperse the swelling.” Documents show the same method was used in nineteenth-century Germany and Austria, where cannabis was “laid on the painful breasts of women who have given birth.”