Weedmaps Partners With MJ Freeway to Provide Real-Time, Online Cannabis Inventory Menus

COLORADO: Weedmaps, the oldest and largest technology company in the cannabis space which operates the dispensary, delivery, doctor and deal finder site Weedmaps.com and the media site Marijuana.com, has partnered with industry-leading compliance and seed-to-sale tracking software solution, MJ Freeway, to provide a valuable menu integration for operators to easily display their products to consumers and patients.

Operators that manage their day-to-day inventory through MJ Freeway’s seed-to-sale tracking platform can benefit from a direct integration to Weedmaps, eliminating the need for manual, double-entry of data. When a product’s price changes, or inventory is low or out-of-stock in the point-of-sale system, MJ Freeway seamlessly updates the data on the corresponding Weedmaps dispensary profile in real-time.

“Dispensary staff should be focused on serving patients and customers, not distracted by the constant need to manually update an online menu. Our partnership with Weedmaps, one of the most trusted online resource for dispensary and product reviews, is a testament to our commitment to improving efficiency for our clients by providing relevant technology solutions,” said Ike Hull, Director of Technical Operations for MJ Freeway.

Cannabis operators can choose to display some or all of their live inventory on their Weedmaps profile page, ranging from marijuana flower to edibles, topicals, concentrates, and more.

“Members of Weedmaps that take advantage of this integration will be able to gain an advantage by displaying the most accurate menus that show the breadth and variety of products and pricing. We’re excited to offer this functionality in partnership with MJ Freeway to help save our clients’ time and ensure accuracy of information for consumers,” said Chris Beals, President & General Counsel from Weedmaps.

Apple’s Ban On marijuana Social Networking App Goes Up In Smoke

CALIFORNIA: Apple has lightened up on restrictions that once banned cannabis-focused social networking apps from its App Store.

The tech giant reversed course Thursday night by making MassRoots, a social network for cannabis lovers, available on the iOS App Store a little over three months after banning the site’s app. MassRoots first became available through the App Store in 2013, but Apple decided to pull the app last month due to conflicts with company guidelines banning “apps that encourage excessive consumption of alcohol or illegal substances.”

To avoid running afoul of that App Store rule, MassRoots agreed to add a geo-restricting function that only makes the app available in the 23 states that have legalized medical marijuana, the social network said Friday in a blog post. That tweak apparently swayed Apple, as the app was once again available for download from the App Store as of Friday. (MacRumors noted last night that it was possible to bypass the geo-restrictions by signing up for a MassRoots account through the company’s website before logging into the app, though MassRoots founder Isaac Dietrich later said his site was working to close that loophole by Friday.)

 

Pitching Marijuana Startups Brings New Meaning To High Tech

CALIFORNIA: Investing in a social network closely tied to a booming industry sounds great, until Apple kicks the thing you invested in out of the App Store because the platform is all about marijuana.

It’s one of the many things that can happen when two of the fastest growing industries in America come together, as is taking place this week in San Francisco, where several dozen entrepreneurs are pitching 200 or so investors, Shark Tank style.

Organizers of the investor-pitch forum cite as legitimacy the recent multimillion dollar investment by Silicon Valley titan Peter Thiel‘s Founders Fund in a holding company of several marijuana-related firms. The entrepreneurs at the Fairmont Hotel are pitching startups selling marijuana-growing equipment, apps that help with medicinal marijuana delivery, and even a spray that an entrepreneur says was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that coats marijuana with grower information, acting as a kind of DNA bar code.

“It’s more suited to what cannabis would be in the future,” says DNA Trek founder Anthony Zografos.

Since Colorado and Washington first voted to legalize recreational marijuana use in late 2012, the legal cannabis market has grown from $1.5 billion in 2013 to $2.7 billion last year, according to industry estimates. That kind of velocity gets the attention of investors, many of whom focus on tech.

Marijuana Delivery Startups Are Ready. The U.S. Government Is Not.

WASHINGTON: Canary, a new startup that offers on-demand marijuana delivery, recently launched with the tagline “Prohibition is over.” The startup’s webpage advertises 24/7 availability for pot in Colorado and Washington, where state legislatures recently legalized the sale of recreational marijuana. The site teases a sleek, simple app for ordering, available for both iPhone and Android devices; knowledgeable couriers will work with local dispensaries to bring the goods to your door with three the click of three buttons, Canary promises, making acquiring pot as easy as ordering takeout Chinese food.

There’s just one problem: It’s totally illegal.

Though the prohibition on selling recreational marijuana in Colorado and Washington may be over, the prohibition on delivering it is not. Both states have laws on the books explicitly banning the delivery of weed, wary of losing track of what is already strange and new territory.

That’s harsh news for Canary co-founders Josiah Tullis and Megh Vakharia, two University of Washington undergrads who have been forced to cut back on their grand pot delivery schemes due to the government strictures.