Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom Releases Report On Guidelines For Marijuana Legalization

CALIFORNIA:  A panel chaired by Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom hopes to guide the debate on the legalization of marijuana in California with an emphasis on limiting children’s access to cannabis, reducing illegal activity and tightly regulating the drug’s growth and sales.

In a report released Wednesday, the group lays out 58 recommendations and goals for implementing general legalization — an issue expected to go before voters next year.

The document offers broad principles –“protecting California’s youth” — as well as nitty-gritty suggestions for collecting data and limiting advertising.

Newsom said in an interview that he hopes the report offers guidance to proponents of a legalization initiative aimed at the November 2016 ballot, as well as to help lawmakers and officials who would have to implement it if it passed.

Got pot? San Francisco To Host Medical Marijuana Food Fair

CALIFORNIA:  If a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down, imagine what a pancake breakfast might do for medical marijuana.

Marijuana is only legal for medical purposes in California, but that isn’t stopping purveyors of pot-infused cupcakes, nuts and other edible forms of the drug from putting on an outdoor food festival to showcase their wares.

The “Get Baked Sale” happening Saturday at a food truck hub in San Francisco comes as marijuana advocates are working to legalize recreational use of the drug through a statewide voter initiative in November 2016.

“It’s going to be legal next year, so if we integrate it now, people can come see what it’s like and have fun, that it’s not what they think and it’s definitely going mainstream,” event creator Jared Stratton said.

 

5 Lessons For California On Marijuana Legalization

CALIFORNIA: Many people were stunned in 2012 when voters in Colorado and Washington adopted the nation’s first laws making marijuana legal for adults.

Some never thought it would happen. Most knew it would, but didn’t expect it to be so soon. And just about everyone assumed that, if or when it did happen, it would surely happen in California before anywhere else.

The Golden State has long been at the forefront of the marijuana policy reform debate. In 1996, it became the first state to allow marijuana use for medical purposes. In 2010, it fell just a few percentage points short of becoming the first to extend that right to adults 21 and older. And for the past two decades, it has been a major battleground for conflicting state and federal marijuana policies.

While California may not have been one of the first two states to end marijuana prohibition — or even one of the second two; Alaska and Oregon took that honor in November — there is little doubt it will be one of the next.