Cuomo Says He's 'Comfortable' With Medical Marijuana Plan

NEW YORK: Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday he’s changed his stance on medical marijuana in part because the state will have control over how the program is administered.

Cuomo plans in his State of the State address on Wednesday to announce the legalization of medical marijuana at 20 hospitals in New York and for limited diseases, such as cancer and glaucoma. He hasn’t detailed the locations or the specific regulations, but he will do it through executive order rather than through a new law adopted by the Legislature.

Cuomo said having the state Department of Health oversee the program would allow the state to quickly make any changes if there are problems. Twenty states have legalized medical marijuana.

“I feel comfortable with this approach,” Cuomo told reporters at the Capitol. “Medical marijuana — I understand the upside. I also understand the downside. If you look at some of the states that have done marijuana, you’ll see the downside clearly.”

Cuomo Said Set To Revive 1980 New York Medical Marijuana Law

NEW YORK:  Governor Andrew Cuomo is planning to revive a 1980 medical-marijuana law to allow some New York hospitals to make use of the drug for patients with cancer, glaucoma and other illnesses.

Cuomo, a Democrat, is expected to make the announcement in his Jan. 8 State of the State address, a person familiar with the speech said. The governor plans to use his executive authority to bypass the legislature where medical marijuana bills passed by the assembly have died in the Republican-controlled Senate. [Read more…]

Cuomo Said Set To Revive 1980 New York Medical Marijuana Law

NEW YORK:  Governor Andrew Cuomo is planning to revive a 1980 medical-marijuana law to allow some New York hospitals to make use of the drug for patients with cancer, glaucoma and other illnesses.

Cuomo, a Democrat, is expected to make the announcement in his Jan. 8 State of the State address, a person familiar with the speech said. The governor plans to use his executive authority to bypass the legislature where medical marijuana bills passed by the assembly have died in the Republican-controlled Senate. [Read more…]

New York legislation will never be progressive

NEW YORK: Earlier this year, New York looked poised to become the 19th state to legalize medical marijuana. The state Assembly passed a bill by a 99-41 margin June 3. A Quinnipiac poll taken that week indicated that 70 percent of New Yorkers supported the idea. And in the state Senate, the Republicans who had blocked medical-marijuana measures the three times they’d passed the Assembly now retained power only by allying with five renegade Democrats—one of whom, Diane Savino of Staten Island, was the bill’s sponsor. Savino repeatedly said she believed she had enough votes to pass the bill, and would bring it to the floor when the right time came.

That time didn’t come. When the state Senate adjourned early in the morning of June 22, the bill had never reached the floor, despite the renegade Democrat faction’s leader, Jeffrey Klein, cosponsoring a more restrictive revised version. Another measure, to reduce the penalty for marijuana possession “in public view” from a misdemeanor to a $100 fine, also died without a vote in the Senate.

[Read more…]

New York legislation will never be progressive

NEW YORK: Earlier this year, New York looked poised to become the 19th state to legalize medical marijuana. The state Assembly passed a bill by a 99-41 margin June 3. A Quinnipiac poll taken that week indicated that 70 percent of New Yorkers supported the idea. And in the state Senate, the Republicans who had blocked medical-marijuana measures the three times they’d passed the Assembly now retained power only by allying with five renegade Democrats—one of whom, Diane Savino of Staten Island, was the bill’s sponsor. Savino repeatedly said she believed she had enough votes to pass the bill, and would bring it to the floor when the right time came.

That time didn’t come. When the state Senate adjourned early in the morning of June 22, the bill had never reached the floor, despite the renegade Democrat faction’s leader, Jeffrey Klein, cosponsoring a more restrictive revised version. Another measure, to reduce the penalty for marijuana possession “in public view” from a misdemeanor to a $100 fine, also died without a vote in the Senate.

[Read more…]