Speaking Out Against Cannabigotry At Seattle Hempfest

WASHINGTON:  Seattle Hempfest was my first-ever cannabis related event after getting fired as a local news anchor for using marijuana. I was the victim of cannabigotry and after coming out with my story, I was invited to speak about my experience on a panel among some pretty impressive people.  The panel took place on the Ric Smith Hemposium Stage and was titled: Cannabigotry: We Legalized, Why Are We Still Fighting?

Each speaker was asked to define cannabigotry as they understood it. I define cannabigotry as treating someone differently simply because they use cannabis. In my experience, I lost my job as a local news anchor for using marijuana in my free time, even though I would have kept my job had I chosen to use alcohol and pharmaceuticals. To me, that is a perfect example of cannabigotry: I was punished for using a safer substance than the socially accepted vices.

In the picture above you can see the rest of the panel included Charlo Greene, a fellow former news anchor whose story went viral when she quit live on the air to focus on legalizing marijuana in Alaska; Stephanie Viskovich, a medical marijuana activist in Washington State;  Allison Holcomb, the leader of Washington State’s I-502 marijuana legalization campaign; and Leland Berger, a longtime Oregon cannabis advocate and attorney. Needless to say, I was very honored to be at the same table as these experienced activists.

New Jersey Pot Activist Opens Healthy Eatery Across From City Hall

NEW JERSEY:  Marijuana activist and Trentonian columnist Ed Forchion has leased two adjoining East State Street properties and will soon open a restaurant and spiritual sanctuary.

“I’m obviously catering to the cannabis consuming community in the area, but I also I want to tap into the artsy crowd here in Trenton,” said Forchion, who calls himself “Weedman.”

The properties, located directly across the street from City Hall, will be named NJ Weedman’s Joint and Liberty Bell Temple III. The business is scheduled to open June 15, but on Monday afternoon about a dozen people were gathered at the restaurant as a chef cooked turkey burgers and Forchion explained his vision.

The restaurant portion of the business will open at 6 a.m. on weekdays and serve affordable, healthy food, Forchion said. The menu will not offer any pork or beef, and will feature items such as sushi, pasta, fish, chicken, roasted vegetable platters, healthy soups, fruit platters, fresh sandwich wraps and more. There will also be a vegetarian menu, Forchion said, and the restaurant will offer natural energy drinks such as fruit smoothies, breakfast shakes and blended juices.

Smoking Marijuana For 50 Years, And Turning Out Just Fine

NEW YORK:  As much as Catherine Hiller refuses to admit it, marijuana is a gateway drug. Seriously, after smoking more or less every day for the past 50 years, there had to be some consequences. Yet, she did not go to jail after a random police stop. She did not end up strung out on heroin, sprawled in an alley. She didn’t even binge-munch herself into obesity.

Her daily puffs led her to write a book, “Just Say Yes: A Marijuana Memoir.”

Just in case people approached her story waiting for the Lifetime movie moment of regret and picking up the pieces of a broken life, she started her book in the present day, flashing back, if you will, to the rest of her life. As a writer — she has published novels and short stories — the approach was an entertaining challenge. As a wife, daughter of an activist and proud mother of three young men, she wanted to show that her life turned out nicely.

These 5 People Could Legalize Marijuana In Texas

TEXAS:  Texans are fed up with failed marijuana policies.

That’s the message state lawmakers will hear from roughly 200 concerned citizens on Wednesday, during a lobbying day organized by Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy.

While fledgling campaigns to legalize marijuana are sprouting up around the country, none is more ambitious than the one in Texas. Republicans control the state politically and it’s a stronghold for conservative culture.

Still, marijuana law reform is possible. A 2014 poll found that nearly half of Texans would legalize the drug. Only 23 percent supported keeping it illegal in all cases.

Pot Prohibition: The End Game is No Federal Schedule

Since 1972, there have been many proposals in the U. S. to remove cannabis from Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act, the most tightly restricted category reserved for drugs which have “no currently accepted medical use.” Cannabis does not meet the Controlled Substances Act’s strict criteria for placement in Schedule I, and therefore the government is required by law either to permit medical use or to remove the drug from federal control altogether. [Read more…]