Wyoming’s Marijuana Laws To Be Enforced During Great America Solar Eclipse

WYOMING: Visitors from across the globe expected to travel to Wyoming for the Great American Solar Eclipse on August 21 are being advised by law enforcement officials that the state’s marijuana laws will be strictly enforced.

“Traffic laws will be strictly enforced and driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs will not be tolerated on Wyoming’s roadways,” Byron Oedekoven, executive director of the Wyoming Association of Sheriffs and Chiefs of Police (WASCOP). He added that, while other nearby states including Colorado have legalized marijuana, the drug is illegal in Wyoming.

“Medical marijuana is not legal in Wyoming, and even if you have a card from another state it is still illegal to possess marijuana in Wyoming,” he explained. “If you are caught with any controlled substance you will be charged with a misdemeanor or felony drug offense depending upon how much of that substance you have in your possession.”

It is estimated that 250,000 visitors will travel to Wyoming to experience the eclipse, according to Oedekoven. Under the leadership of Governor Matt Mead, federal, state, and local agencies are working together to safely accommodate visitors to the state.

From Jackson to Torrington, more than a dozen cities in Wyoming are in the “path of totality,” the narrow path across the earth’s surface where viewers will experience the total eclipse of the sun when the moon passes in front of its surface. Because of the state’s wide-open spaces, clear skies, and spectacular scenery, it is one of the top destinations in the world for people seeking the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to experience the eclipse.

Through its Traffic Safety Project (TSP) WASCOP is working with the Wyoming Office of Highway Safety and the Governor’s Commission on Impaired Driving to identify strategies to address traffic and other safety issues.

“We hope people will come to Wyoming to experience the incredible beauty and quality of life in our state,” said Oedekoven. “On behalf of the women and men of WASCOP dedicated to serving and protecting residents and visitors in our state, we promise to do everything possible to ensure you will have a safe and enjoyable visit.”

Yellowstone Sees Rise In Marijuana Cases

WYOMING:  An increasing number of visitors to Yellowstone National Park are being prosecuted for possessing small amounts of medical and recreational pot, which remains illegal on federal land.

Park rangers attribute the trend both to ignorance of federal law and the growing prevalence of legal pot in other states, including neighboring Colorado, which has legal medical and recreational marijuana.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Cheyenne reports it prosecuted 21 marijuana cases from Yellowstone in 2010 and 52 in 2013. As of Dec. 17, the office had handled 80 cases in 2014.

Those convicted of misdemeanor possession commonly receive a $1,000 fine.

Seeing Green: Most Wyominigites Support Medical Marijuana

WYOMING:  Wyomingites’ long-standing support for medical marijuana may move toward reality, as the Legislature will be alight in cannabis bills next month.

Three bills that would loosen Wyoming’s prohibition on the drug may go before lawmakers.

Meanwhile, a new University of Wyoming poll shows that a majority of Wyoming residents, 72 percent, continue to support adult use of marijuana if the drug is prescribed by a physician.

Twenty-five percent of Wyomingites oppose medical marijuana, according to the October poll, in which 768 residents were interviewed by phone.

 

German Court Allows Patients To Grow Medical Marijuana

GERMANY:  A German court ruled for the first time on Tuesday that seriously ill patients may grow their own marijuana for medical purposes in certain cases.

The administrative court in the western city of Cologne said that while cannabis remained illegal for general use in Germany, it may be cultivated at home by some patients with medical permits for the drug.

The court said in a statement that applications must be reviewed on a case-by-case basis, adding that a key condition was that “access by third parties to the plants and products must be sufficiently restricted”.

The decision came as many parts of the world are relaxing laws on cannabis use and medicinal marijuana is gaining popularity to ease suffering from cancer, glaucoma, HIV or AIDS, Hepatitis C, Parkinson’s disease and other serious conditions.