South Dakota Governor Noem Encourages Legislators To Table Industrial Hemp Discussions

SOUTH DAKOTA: Governor Kristi Noem asked the South Dakota legislature to table discussions on legalizing industrial hemp this legislative session.

“South Dakota is not ready for industrial hemp production,” said Noem. “There are still questions about the impact on public safety, enforcement, and costs to the taxpayers. We need to see federal guidelines when they are issued and then decide if this commodity is as promising as they say it will be.”

In December 2018, then-Congresswoman Noem voted in favor of the 2018 Farm Bill, a small section of which loosened regulations on industrial hemp. The crop is not currently authorized for growth in South Dakota under any state or federal program. The South Dakota Department of Agriculture and Governor Noem have discouraged producers from making plans to grow industrial hemp in the 2019 growing season.

Flandreau Sioux Put Marijuana Resort On Hold

SOUTH DAKOTA: The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe is temporarily suspending its marijuana cultivation and distributing facilities and is destroying its existing crop as leaders seek clarification on regulations from the federal government, according to the tribe’s lawyer.

Seth Pearman said the suspension is pivotal to the continued success of the marijuana venture and that tribal leadership is confident that after getting clarification from theU.S. Department of Justice, “it will be better suited to succeed.”

“The tribe will continue to consult with the federal and state government and hopes to be granted parity with states that have legalized marijuana,” Pearman said in the news release.

 

‘Marijuana Resort’ Budding In South Dakota, Set To Open By Year’s End

SOUTH DAKOTA: The marijuana plants are already growing in a remodeled building on the Flandreau Santee Sioux reservation as the southeast South Dakota tribe shoots for a New Year’s Eve opening for its first-of-its-kind resort.

The state-of-the-art marijuana growing operation with its 65 strains of plants is in its infancy as finishing touches are being put on the building where it will take about 14 weeks to grow about 80 pounds of pot. That’s how much the tribe hopes to sell weekly at its smoking lounge and entertainment resort just south of their casino that is noting its 25th year of operation this month.

The resort has been about a year in the making, as the tribal council which leads the tribe of 280 adults and 110 children on the reservation voted 5-1 late last year to pursue the resort idea.

Interest in the operation has certainly been high, and president Tony Reider said other tribes across the nation are closely watching, as it will be the first-ever marijuana resort on a reservation.

 

South Dakota Tribe To Open Nation’s First Marijuana Resort

SOUTH DAKOTA:  The Santee Sioux tribe has proven its business acumen, running a casino, a 120-room hotel and a 240-head buffalo ranch on the plains of South Dakota.

Now the small tribe of 400 is undertaking a new venture — opening the nation’s first marijuana resort on its reservation.

The experiment could offer a money-making model for other tribes seeking economic opportunities beyond casinos.

Santee Sioux leaders plan to grow the pot and sell it in a smoking lounge that includes a nightclub, arcade games, bar and food service and, eventually, slot machines and an outdoor music venue.

“We want it to be an adult playground,” said tribal President Anthony Reider. “There’s nowhere else in American that has something like this.”

Why American Indian Tribes Are Getting Into the Marijuana Business

SOUTH DAKOTA:  This New Year’s Eve, Tony Reider wants to throw a party unlike any his South Dakota tribe has seen.

There will be live music, food, outdoor games—and, floating over the revelry, a haze of marijuana smoke, from a first-of-its-kind pot lounge that is set to open by the end of the year, said Reider, the tribal president of the Flandreau Santee Sioux in Flandreau, S.D.

That pot lounge—modeled on an Amsterdam coffee shop, where customers would be able to buy and smoke up to 2 grams of marijuana a day—would be illegal anywhere else in South Dakota, which, like most U.S. states, bans the sale, possession and public smoking of pot.

As Tribe Prepares To Legalize Marijuana, Questions Remain

SOUTH DAKOTA:  Five months from now, according to the plan, Indians and non-Indians alike will be smoking marijuana on tribal lands in Flandreau.

The U.S. Justice Department told Indian tribes last December that they can grow and sell marijuana as long as they follow the same federal conditions laid out for Washington, Colorado and other states that have legalized the drug.

For the tribe and Colorado-based Monarch America, hired to design, construct and develop a grow facility on the Flandreau reservation, that has opened the door to a potentially rich new business enterprise — just as the advent of casino gambling did decades ago.

They intend to open by the first week of December, says Monarch America CEO Eric Hagen, who adds, with a smile, “Everyone will have a merry Christmas.”

South Dakota Indian Tribe Signs Deal With Colorado Company To Grow Pot

SOUTH DAKOTA:  An Indian tribe in South Dakota that plans to start selling marijuana for recreational and medicinal purposes has chosen a Colorado-based company to grow and distribute the drug on the reservation.

The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe on Wednesday signed a contract with Monarch America, Inc. The company will be responsible for designing the single, indoor site where the drug will be cultivated and sold.

The tribe earlier this month legalized the growth of marijuana on the reservation’s land. Tribal leaders hope to begin selling the drug by Jan. 1.

 

Tribe’s OK Of Marijuana Brings South Dakota AG Warning

SOUTH DAKOTA:  The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe in eastern South Dakota plans to sell marijuana by Jan. 1; but that prompts a warning from the SD attorney general that tribal laws won’t protect non-Native Americans, nor anyone off tribal land.

The Santee Sioux will grow marijuana at one site; hopefully earning a monthly profit of $2 million according to an Associated Press story.

In a news release, South Dakota Attorney General Marty Jackley stated that while he respects each tribe’s authority to pass laws, people also have to recognize South Dakota’s laws prohibiting “physical possession, distribution, and manufacture of marijuana by all non-Indian persons anywhere in South Dakota including within Indian Country; and all Indian persons outside of Indian Country.”

Flandreau Tribe Votes To Legalize Marijuana

SOUTH DAKOTA:  A South Dakota tribe has voted to grow and sell marijuana as soon as Fall 2015.

The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe executive committee voted 5-1 Thursday to legalize the growing and use of marijuana on tribal land. Trustee Roxee Johnson was the sole opposition to the ordinance.

The marijuana control ordinance will establish a facility where marijuana will be grown. Another location will offer marijuana for recreational use.

The ordinance approves marijuana consumption only inside of a single facility that has yet to be determined. Officials describe the proposed facility to function similarly to a bar. Tribe officials said that marijuana will not be allowed to leave that location.