Poll: Utahns support legalization of medical marijuana

57 percent of Utahns oppose legalizing marijuana for personal use but 61 percent support allowing individuals to use marijuana if their doctor has prescribed it.

UTAH: A new poll of registered voters has found that Utahns are opposed to the legalization of marijuana for recreational use but are supportive of allowing the use of cannabis for medical situations.

According to the poll of 500 random voters, 57 percent of Utahns oppose legalizing marijuana for personal use but 61 percent support allowing individuals to use marijuana if their doctor has prescribed it.

“We expected most Utahns to oppose a general legalization of marijuana, but were honestly surprised that a majority of Utah voters indicated support for legalizing medical marijuana. One might think, given the predominant political party and religion, that that wouldn’t be the case. Evidently many Utahns have been persuaded regarding the medical benefits cannabis can offer to sick people,” said Connor Boyack, president of the Libertas Institute, the organization that produced the poll.

Should Utah move in a direction of legalization for medical uses, one Pleasant Grove mom said she would welcome the change.

Jennifer May’s son suffers from a rare form of epilepsy called Dravet syndrome. May said she is not advocating for full legalization of medical marijuana, but she is advocating for a form of marijuana that contains nearly none of the products that cause the “high” recreational users seek from the plant but has many of the properties that will provide relief to her son and may lessen the number of seizures he has.

“It creates no high, it is also not smoked,” she said. “It is in a concentrated form in an oil. It is administered by mouth through a drop or syringe orally for kids.”

May explained the medication right now is only available in Colorado and that for her to bring it into Utah would be a federal crime. She hopes, though, that the state Legislature would at least open up the law to allow for this drug to be brought in to potentially provide relief for her 11-year-old son, who suffers five to 30 seizures every day.

“It needs to be an option,” May said. “We are not saying it is the miracle for everyone but it needs to be an option.”

 

Read full article @ Herald Extra

Comments

  1. Gradi Jordan says

    How very interesting – this is a completely chopped up article from several different writers and a logo form Legalize Utah. What the hell?

    Just steal from here and there with no credit given.

    Is this what the MMJ community has come to?

  2. Gradi Jordan says

    How very interesting – this is a completely chopped up article from several different writers and a logo form Legalize Utah. What the hell?

    Just steal from here and there with no credit given.

    Is this what the MMJ community has come to?

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