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Oregon Cities/Counties Prohibiting Licensed Recreational Marijuana Facilities (UPDATE)

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OREGON: The list of cities or counties in Oregon that have prohibited the establishment of licensed recreational marijuana producers, processors, wholesalers, and/or retailers has been updated to include Brownsville, Dufur, and Turner.

 

OLCC Provides Oregon Legislature With Recreational Marijuana Supply And Demand Study

OREGON: Today the Oregon Liquor Control Commission provided the Oregon Legislative Assembly with the 2019 Recreational Marijuana Supply and Demand Legislative Report required by ORS 475B.548.
2019 Recreational Marijuana Supply and Demand Legislative Report
A Letter from OLCC Director Steve Marks

Oregon’s Public Policy Approach to Support Legal Marijuana Production and the State’s Abundant Supply: The Course for Seeking the Right Balance

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission is grateful for the opportunity to produce for the Oregon Legislature a comprehensive examination of the amount of marijuana accounted for and contained within Oregon’s regulated recreational marijuana market.
Let me first acknowledge that we have a considerable supply of marijuana in our state’s recreational marijuana system.  That licensed Oregon cannabis growers have become successful in producing this volume of marijuana is due in no short order to the intentional choices made by Oregon voters and policy makers.  Now we find ourselves at a crossroads where our state’s history with marijuana and the future of cannabis commercialization meet.

Oregon’s unique geography and climate are qualities that have enabled generations of Oregon farmers to produce copious amounts of cannabis. The illegal export of Oregon cannabis has been taking place for decades. For Oregon, producing a lot of marijuana is not new news; producing a lot of marijuana that is tracked in the legal system is.

Recognition that cannabis is woven into the state’s cultural fabric initially emerged as institutional tolerance when Oregon became the first state in the country to decriminalize marijuana possession in 1973. Greater acceptance of cannabis occurred in 1998 when Oregon, following California’s lead two years earlier, established a medical marijuana program. A broader embrace of cannabis took place when Oregon voters approved Measure 91 in November,2014, and became the 3rd state to legalize recreational marijuana.

With the debate around legalization largely settled, Oregon’s elected officials began making annual adjustments during legislative sessions beginning in 2015.  Each legislative modification to Oregon’s regulated cannabis system has attempted to improve the industry’s economic stability by removing barriers to entering the market while at the same time enhancing regulatory compliance to address public safety concerns while withstanding federal scrutiny.

Oregon is not creating a new industry, it is converting an illegal cannabis production economy, and a loosely-regulated medical program, into a well-regulated legal market

Oregon oversupply is a sign that policy choices made to attract illegal and grey market producers into the new commercial system have been successful; this was a start-up challenge Colorado and Washington didn’t have to face. Oregon medical marijuana growers had long been suspected of diverting into the illegal market so it was important to attract these well-established producers into the OLCC’s new regulated recreational marijuana program.

To entice medical as well as formerly illegal growers into Oregon’s legal market the state lowered the barriers to entry with low license fees and taxes and chose not to limit the number of licenses. This approach fulfilled the immediate objective to absorb medical marijuana providers into the OLCC market, but it has led to industry churn as businesses face mounting cost pressures and attempt to position themselves for the long term.

The ongoing objective is to account for and contain legally produced cannabis within Oregon, create consumer confidence in the legal market, and establish compliance performance boundaries for marijuana licensees.

By requiring the tracking of marijuana flower and marijuana products, CTS has provided the most reliable accounting for legally produced cannabis in Oregon. For the first time, the state’s production of marijuana is accounted for and there are consequences – criminal and administrative – for licensees that divert product from the regulated system.

Oregon’s legal market has created a new growth industry with quality product, a diversity of choices, and transparent information for consumers

Oregon’s successful transition to a regulated adult-use market has provided customers an unprecedented degree of consumer safety confidence. Oregon’s testing program and packaging and labeling requirements are considered best-in-class and are being replicated by other states that have legalized adult use cannabis. This confidence has contributed to consistent growth in retail activity as evidenced by the $198 million in state and local sales tax revenue generated since legalization.

On the demand side the establishment of a legitimate market has resulted in consumers shifting their purchase activity away from the illegal market to licensed retailers. The conversion of most OMMP dispensaries to OLCC retailers, coupled with the OLCC’s deliberate effort to allow medical grade products for sale at retail, has established a statewide retail network, in which medical marijuana patients are also able to obtain tax-free products.

Industry innovation has continued since the OLCC’s establishment of and oversight over the marijuana supply chain in January 2017; today consumers are able to find a selection of products reflecting a marketplace with 2,100 licensees. As more consumer choices have been introduced and prices have decreased, sales have seen a corresponding increase.

A context for change

Oregon’s current supply in the legal market is a reflection of successful policies to move production into the legal system. The adoption of the legal system by recreational consumers and medical patients for the purchase of branded and tested cannabis products is a strong indication that the legal system is winning the battle against the illegal market.

At the same time, Oregon regulators and law enforcement, with support of the licensed industry, are developing and utilizing new resources and tools to confront illegal market activity. Now that the legal system has successfully taken hold, policy makers can make adjustments combined with market forces to work towards a sustainable economic balance between supply and demand.

The economic condition of the market that the OLCC will be regulating in the next two years remains uncertain. Just as it took time to establish legal alcohol markets after the repeal of alcohol prohibition, the development of the legal marijuana industry will require patience. In less than three years Oregon has made substantial progress toward creating a controlled, economically viable and well-regulated cannabis industry. While regulations to control and manage this new industry will continue to change, no matter the future course, the ability to support existing and aspiring licensees and take enforcement against those that don’t follow the rules will be a crucial function for the state and the private sector businesses that have entered this industry.

A primary objective of establishing Oregon’s regulated market was to contain cannabis legally produced in Oregon from diversion into the illegal market.  Oregon’s legal cannabis market and its framework for accountability and containment indicates the system is performing as it was designed.

At this point we have another opportunity to make intentional choices.  With market mechanisms and thoughtful public policy, the state of Oregon and the OLCC can continue to control what we’ve created – to reinforce and strengthen the regulatory system we’ve built in just three short years.  One corrective policy tool proposed by the Governor would allow the OLCC to place a moratorium on licenses.  As the 2019 legislative session progresses other ideas may emerge.

We expect any guidance that the Governor and Legislature may develop during the 2019 legislative session will strengthen the continued implementation of a regulated marijuana system that balances public safety concerns with the vision of Oregon voters.

The 2019 Recreational Marijuana Supply and Demand Legislative Report is more than just about numbers. Its substance and specific methodology reflect a state-of-the-art approach for evaluating use and demand and normalizing values and equivalencies of differing cannabis products as produced and sold in the Oregon marketplace. While not infallible, this study provides a sound base for the discussion and debate of policy development. The OLCC appreciates the work and time its talented staff and outside peer reviewers have spent to bring forward this public data on legal marijuana production in Oregon.

A copy of the 2019 Recreational Marijuana Supply and Demand Legislative Report can be found on the OLCC on the Recreational Marijuana main page under the Government Resources column.

 

Oregon And Washington’s Top Marijuana Regulators In Conversation At 2019 Cannabis Collaborative Conference

OLCC to Provide Program, Rules Updates at Portland Expo on January 23, 2019

OREGON: The top regulators from the Oregon Liquor Control Commission and the Washington State Liquor & Cannabis Board will reprise their conversation on the state of the legal cannabis industry in their respective states at the 2019 Cannabis Collaborative Conference (CCC).

On Wednesday, January 23, 2019 at 9 a.m. at the Portland Expo Center, OLCC Executive Director Steve Marks, and WSLCB Director Rick Garza, will talk about the similar and different issues regulators are working on in Oregon and Washington.

Their conversation will be the keynote kick off for the 2019 CCC and will include observations about testing standards and consumer safety, product demand, and the work to standardize regulations across state lines as more states legalize adult use cannabis.

OLCC policy staff will also be on CCC panels discussing: OLCC Policies & Rules – Three Years in the Making, What’s Next?, OLCC Compliance Updates,Regulations and Profitability: A Listening Session, Hemp Rules and Regulation Updates, and The Future of Enforcement.

During both conference days – Wednesday, January 23, and Thursday January 24 -policy experts from the OLCC and other state agencies including:  Oregon Health Authority, Oregon Department of Agriculture, Oregon Department of Revenue, and Oregon Water Resources Department will be available to answer questions at the OLCC booth on the conference exhibit floor.  Look for the state regulators at Booth 125 at the southwest end of the exhibit floor.

For OLCC Marijuana Program licensees and medical marijuana registrants participating in the OMMP Marijuana Tracking program, the OLCC will present information sessions at the Portland Expo Center, in the lobby of Building E next door to the Cannabis Collaborative Conference covering Recreational Marijuana Program and Rules updates, a Packaging and Labeling program update, and an OMMP Marijuana Tracking Program update.  Admission to the conference is NOT required to attend the OLCC programs.

Register for the OLCC information sessions here

420MEDIA Trailblazers In Cannabis: Home Grown ORegonicX Founders Angela & Jared Panks

Trailblazers In Cannabis

Digital marketing agency 420MEDIA and the Marijuana Business Association (MJBA) have joined forces to create a series highlighting entrepreneurs trailblazing the cannabis scene. Each week, we profile a noteworthy business pioneer and ask each 5 questions. This week’s featured trailblazers are Angela and Jared Panks, founders of Home Grown ORegonicX.

Tell us about your Company

Our farm, Home Grown ORegonicX is a medical garden in Southern Oregon. We provide our deaf community and patients with a place to grow organic medical cannabis and teach conscious cultivation practices. We use nature and biodiversity to provide the cleanest herbs possible and employee our deaf community to the best of our ability. A hands on learning approach is the best way to teach our deaf community.

We have been growing cannabis since 2007 for our family and patients. We recently started doing tutorial videos on cannabis cultivation and the medical benefits of cannabis for the deaf and hearing impaired community. We want our community to understand the medical benefits of cannabis and about the Endocannabinoid System, Organic cultivation and how it can benefit us all. It’s a challenge for us because the ASL Language is still being created on cannabis and science in general. A lot of words or concepts need to be finger spelled for people to understand what we are taking about which can be a challenge in itself. For many years the science behind cannabis and cannabinoids has been hidden to our community and we are trying to change that.
homegrown ORegonicX logoWe began terpene mapping the various strains we would grow so that we could get a better idea of how our herbs would interact on a patient and try to make specialized medicine to help with people’s various issues. Our goal is to work with nature and your Endocannabinoid System to allow people to live a quality of life. Knowing which strains produce specific terpenes and how it will affect someone is important. Not everyone wants to get high. Most people want to lead a productive, healthy life style and we are here to support that.

We also want to open up the cannabis industry to the deaf global community. We need to dispel the negative stigmas associated with cannabis and promote knowledge and a deeper understanding of nature and its importance. Breaking down these communication and information barriers for our deaf community is our mission; giving our community a better opportunity is our goal.

Why did you choose the cannabis/hemp business?
We are passionate about medical cannabis, we know that it has healed so many people and has had a positive impact, giving people a better quality of life. The majority of our deaf community is missing out on the benefits that cannabis could bring to their life and surroundings. Some people are still stuck on the stigma behind it. We travel to lots of cannabis events during the past 5 years to bring deaf/cannabis awareness to our industry and community. We still haven’t met another deaf grower aside from our little tribe. We must change that by providing an education and opportunities. Without education, there is no opportunity for this forgotten community.
Angelapicture4flower
What change will your firm address in the industry? Does it address an unmet need?

The change we will address is raising deaf awareness in cannabis industry by inspiring cannabis entrepreneurs to be more involved in the deaf community. We want the deaf and hard of hearing community to be part of this industry. Going to cannabis related events has brought awareness and people want to be a part of opening this world up to our community. Providing education content to the deaf demographic in the cannabis community and getting sign language interpreters for future events.
We are working with ECS Therapy in CO to develop sign language for cannabis world, making it easier for the deaf to be part of this fast growing industry and creating language to represent the science behind cannabis.

We want to raise awareness on Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome (CHS) which is a rare condition where a heavy cannabis user can become violently ill over a period of time. The symptoms mimic those of someone going through a detox. CHS expresses itself with a fever, cold sweats cyclic vomiting, extreme dehydration and the relief of extremely hot baths or showers.

Usher Syndrome is where deaf and hearing impaired individuals slowly go blind. It is a genetic trait that only effect the hearing impaired. Angela was diagnosed with Ushers Syndrome as a kid and has experienced persistent vision loss. She believes that her cannabis use has slowed the diseases progress and it’s a topic that hasn’t been researched.

Organic practice. Making more videos in sign language demonstrating organic cultivation practices. Demonstrating how you can build an ecosystem, worm farming, Integrated Pest Management, Fermentation, compost teas, companion cropping and so much more. Without education there is no opportunity.

 

Angelapankimage1

 

What has been the reaction to your product/service/technology?  
The responses we’ve received have been amazing; people have told us so many times how we open their eyes to the deaf world, and that they want to do whatever possible to help. We met a man at a conference he was speaking at 3 years prior. Jared was interpreting for our group at the Oregon Marijuana Business Conference when we first met. We ran into him again at The Emerald Cup and he was anxious to tell us how after that experience he went on to take sign language. He also as 2 employees that speak sign language.

For being a small group, we have made a lasting impact on this industry and we hope to leave a mark on the world. Jared was a Paramedic/Hotshot/Fire fighter in his former life. Angela owned her own painting business and worked for Legal Shield providing the deaf community with legal representation before getting into the cannabis industry. Our mission has always been to change the world and to leave a positive impact on anything that we put our minds towards. Our lives are a testament of that.

Many people ask how they can help and urged us to form a nonprofit organization which is a difficult thing to do in the cannabis industry. Luckily enough we have partnered with ECS Therapy and we now have a way for people to help us in our mission. We want to be able to change the world for the better and now we have another way for people can participate.

In general, the cannabis community is a kind group of individuals who are genuine and sincere. There have been many life changing experience for both the people we meet and for us as well. We look forward to seeing what God bring into our paths.

People are often bewildered by what we are trying to do. When they see the cannabis we can produce with minimal cost. We can grow organic sun grown cannabis and compete with indoor cultivators in quality. To be able to do this with a small group of deaf patients and create opportunities for them is surreal. Showing our deaf community how to work with nature and building something that will provide food, health and benefit the world. When people actually see the garden they always comment on the attention to detail that we have put into this project. We have had a chance to We had Tommy Chongs family to our home and the first thing they said was, “they had never seen a garden like this before.”  What we do has been around for a long time, how we do it is original and progressive.

AngelaandJared2

Are there any upcoming milestones for your company? 

Just being a part of this industry is a milestone. With how Oregon’s legalization process has gone, it has been very difficult. Medical Cultivators have been locked out of a legal market since recreational use was passed. Medical growers fought for legalization and created a great medical system. We were in 70 different stores in Oregon before the OLCC pushed us out of the legal cannabis business market. Continuing to fight for fair access to a legal market is important and we can’t stop until all medical cannabis is no longer the face of the black market.

Creating Sign Language for the cannabis industry is a pretty big milestone too. Working with ECS Therapy to create these opportunities for our deaf community is such an honor. Getting a Non-Profit organization to sponsor us was a pretty tall task considering the Federal Laws and this newly emerging industry. It’s a step in the right direction and one of many obstacles we have been able to overcome. 

We would also like to build a garden where we can bring deaf people from all over the world to teach them hand on cultivation practices and to have a home for those in our community who want to participate in the cannabis industry. We can’t wait to represent the deaf in this industry and get our products out there so people experience it for themselves. 

We have just started going around and making videos of cannabis cups and different events surrounding this industry. We have had the chance to conduct a few interviews and we look forward to getting this stuff put up on our website. Doing things like this will only debunk the stigma around cannabis culture and help people make better life choices. 

We would like to work with a lot of different people on different platforms to create educational content and bring the cannabis message to the globe in Sign Language. We want to share their testimonies and hopefully change people’s lives for the better. Maybe a movie in the future…. Lots of people have bounced ideas off of us. It’s just about finding the right people to do the right things with for the right reason. We want to change the worlds perspective and we can’t do it alone. 

Where can readers learn more?

We are working on website at the moment.
For now, you can check our Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/homegrownoregonicx/ and our Instagram: Home_grown_oregonicx

Have A Heart Opens First Cannabis Dispensary In Oregon

OREGON: Have a Heart opened the doors of its first store in Oregon. The Salem location will bring 20 jobs to Willamette Valley, in addition to the company’s knowledgeable, friendly staff and vast menu of lab-tested and locally-sourced flower, pre-rolls, concentrate, edibles, and topical cannabis products.

Have a Heart’s Chief Executive Officer Ryan Kunkel and Chief Operations Officer, Ed Mitchell were on-hand for the store’s green-ribbon-cutting ceremony.

“Our opening in Oregon makes history as the first cannabis retailer to complete continuity of the west coast from Washington to Hawaii,” said Ryan Kunkel, CEO of Have a Heart. “We have successfully executed on phase one of our plan to create the best service and top-shelf cannabis products at economical prices, across the nation.”

The new shop is located at 4618 Portland Rd. NE #110, just off the 99E, next to Dutch Bros coffee and a stone’s throw away from SunRise Espresso, the Original Pancake House and the Oregon Indoor soccer facility. The location provides easy access not only to local Salem residents and visitors but also the surrounding communities.

Founded in 2011, Have a Heart started 2018 with five operating locations in Washington state. Have a Heart was recently rated by High Times as one of the best cannabis dispensaries in the United States, and earned the distinction as Seattle’s top-selling cannabis retailer from the Puget Sound Business Journal. The company recently closed $25 million in series A financing, the largest private financing round for a pure-play U.S. retail cannabis company to date.

Have a Heart has retail stores across the nation including: Washington, Hawaii, Oregon and California, with additional stores opening soon in Iowa and Ohio. The company has more than eighteen applications pending, including in five additional states. In addition, it has more than twenty sites under negotiation with potential merger partners in another four states.

 

Oregon Marijuana Company Launches Cannabis For Opioids Swap

OREGON: Kaya Holdings has announced it will be holding talks with Oregon state and local law enforcement authorities and compliance officials to launch “Kaya Cares,” a Cannabis-for-Opioids swap program whereby people dependent on opioids and wishing to explore cannabis as a safe alternative can exchange their prescription opioids for cannabis products at no cost.

“We decided to step up and do our part after President Trump announced the war on the opioid epidemic,” commented Kaya Holdings CEO Craig Frank, “Numerous studies, including those reported by Newsweek, NBC News, US News and World Report, CNN and others, have shown that states with legal marijuana programs have declining rates of opioid addiction, with some states reporting a decrease in deaths as high as 25%. We want to help people in the communities we serve, as well as demonstrate that cannabis companies can be part of the President’s solution to the crisis.”

Screenshot 2018-05-31 08.51.25

KAYS presently operates three Kaya Shack marijuana retail stores to service the legal medical and recreational marijuana market in Oregon, with a fourth retail outlet scheduled to open shortly. Additionally, KAYS recently acquired a 26 acre parcel in Lebanon, Oregon, on which it plans to develop the Kaya Farms medical and recreational marijuana grow and manufacturing complex, at which it plans to explore development of  opioid-free cannabis infused pain relief alternatives.

Adds KAYS Senior Advisor, W. David Jones, “The opioid epidemic kills an average of 91 Americans a day. Beyond the human cost in lives and devastated families, the epidemic disrupts our economy with reduced productivity and increased healthcare costs. We realize this administration has been reviewing its stance on legal marijuana and we appreciate US Attorney Jeff Sessions’ clarification to Congress regarding the Cole Amendment. We wish to heed President Trump’s call to create constructive, private sector based initiatives with high probabilities of success. We believe a program like Kaya Cares and other initiatives to be undertaken by KAYS will help transition people away from dangerous opioids, making the government’s war on opioids a little more successful.”

Oregon’s Medical Marijuana Growers Prepare for Tracking

OHA & OLCC Holding Information Sessions across the State

OREGON:  This summer approximately 2,000 medical marijuana growers will need to start using Oregon’s Cannabis Tracking System (CTS) to ensure the marijuana they grow for patients is tracked and reported.  This week the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) launched a series of information sessions and workshops to help growers registered with the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) begin the sign-up process to use CTS.

Oregon Senate Bill 1544, enacted during the 2018 legislative session, requires all OMMP medical marijuana grow sites with three or more patients to use CTS tracking, on or before July 1, 2018.  OMMP registered processors and dispensaries are also required to start using CTS by the July 1st deadline.

More than 1800 licensees in Oregon’s Recreational Marijuana system are already using the CTS, which tracks marijuana and marijuana products from seed to sale.  OHA and OLCC are holding a series of information sessions and workshops around Oregon to help OMMP registrants understand the tracking and reporting requirements, and learn how to use the CTS. 

OHA identified about 2,000 OMMP registered grow sites, where there are three or more patients registered at the grow site address.  Under SB 1544 medical marijuana grow sites limited to two or fewer growers and two or fewer patients are exempt from using CTS.  

The first step for a grow site required to use CTS is to designate one grower at the grow site address as the grow site administrator (GSA).  OHA is conducting a series of community outreach sessions for registered medical growers to help them understand reporting and tracking requirements for all grow sites.

In a second and separate series of meetings, OHA and OLCC will provide registered medical growers, processors, and dispensaries information on the requirements for using CTS.  Also, the State’s CTS provider, Metrc will provide a workshop for the OMMP registrants explaining how to use the CTS.

GSAs will be allowed to sell up to 20 pounds of marijuana into the OLCC regulated recreational marijuana system in a 12 month period.  However, the GSAs must provide proof of legal access to water before the marijuana can be sold into the OLCC market.  This sell-in option applies to a grow site as a whole, so a grow site with four growers would only be allowed to sell a total of 20 pounds into the recreational market, not 80 pounds.

In July 2018, the OLCC will begin auditing OMMP grow sites, processors, and dispensaries subject to tracking in CTS.  Later in 2018 OLCC inspectors will begin visiting OMMP grow sites required to use CTS to verify CTS tracking information, check to make sure CTS is being used properly, and look for any other violations.  However, because OHA regulates the OMMP program, OHA will determine any enforcement based on investigations conducted by OLCC. 

OHA will hold its GSA information meetings in Portland & Albany on May 4, Salemon May 8, Portland and Tillamook on May 10, Portland on May 11, Madras on May 14, Grants Pass on May 16 & 17 Webinars will be held for those that are unable to attend a session in person. More information and registration information can be found on the OHA OMMP website under the section “Informational Workshop Sessions.” 

The combined OHA & OLCC information sessions and workshops will be held in Portland on May 8 and 9, in Grants Pass on May 23, in Ashland on May 24, in Eugene on May 31, in Newport on June 1, in Roseburg on June 7, and Sunriver on June 12 Additional details and registration information can be found on the OLCC Eventbrite page.

Oregon’s Honu Xpress Acquires Exclusive Rights to Metered-Dose Cannabis Inhaler

OREGON: Honu Xpress has acquired the exclusive rights to the Mystabis inhaler technology for its Dab Puff Inhaler. The rights activate after funding the transaction and meeting other customary terms.  The Mystabis Inhaler is a revolutionary patent-pending inhaler that provides pressurized metered-doses of cannabis oil directly to the lung’s capillaries with little to no exhale. 

Use a pharma extender and mask for increased comfort.

Use a pharma extender and mask for increased comfort.

The licensing rights that Honu Xpress is purchasing include the entire world except for Canada and Australia, which were previously purchased in December 2015 by a highly-regarded large international cannabis firm with a market valuation of over $1B.

Medical AspectsThe ability to administer metered doses is something that both patients and the medical community have been waiting for eagerly. Without the use of any form of heat or combustion, this pressurized inhaler (“pMDI”) delivers exact quantities of aerosolized cannabinoids in a manner that provides rapid medicinal effects while preserving the entourage effects of the cannabinoids and terpenoids, unlike distillate inhalers.

Physicians will find the delivery mechanism to be very familiar and will appreciate the precision, controlled dosage delivery of both the THC and other licensed cannabinoid formulations (THC with THC-V, CBD, CBGCBN, etc., to name a few promising favorites).

Mitigating the “One Too Many Hits” ProblemMike Arnold, Honu Xpress CEO, commented, “It has been thirteen months since I discovered the inhaler technology on Google’s patent search.  It’s an amazing technology. It’s effectively a pocket ‘dab hit.’  The Dab Puff Inhaler has the potential of changing the way cannabis is consumed and overindulged.  New users will now be able to experience cannabis with a controlled and predictable dosage in a fast-acting way (estimated five- to 45-second activation time).

“The beauty of this tech is that it is essentially an aerosolized dab hit where the non-vaporized particles are just small enough to clear the throat and enter the lungs but too big to be exhaled.  We already have meetings with potential licensees, including one publicly traded company, and find this particular device to be in high demand, given it’s the only inhaler out there that uses whole-plant extract and waxes. Also, the inhaler has proof of concept already in California and Oregon under former licensing agreements.  It’s an amazing discreet way to experience the potential entourage effect in a way that is totally controlled by the end user.”

 

Oregon AG Rosenblum Statement On U.S. DOJ Rescinding Federal Marijuana Guidance

OREGON: Statement from Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum:

“Last year in Oregon, we collected over $60 million in state taxes as a result of our now legal marijuana industry. At the Oregon Department of Justice we will continue to make sure Oregon’s marijuana industry thrives under our carefully considered state regulatory requirements. The United States Attorney General Jeff Session’s decision today to rescind the Cole Memo, which has provided helpful guidance over the past five years to Oregon and other states that have legalized marijuana, is yet another example of this administration’s overreach. I value my working relationship with Oregon U.S. Attorney-nominee Bill Williams and I look forward to working with his office. States up and down the West Coast, and beyond, have spoken. This is an industry that Oregonians have chosen—and one I will do everything within my legal authority to protect.

Shango Premium Cannabis Introduces Delivery Service In Molalla, Oregon

OREGON: The Shango Premium Cannabis dispensary in Molalla, Oregon will become the first to implement a home delivery service in the area, which will begin Dec. 15.

“We’re absolutely thrilled to be the first dispensary in our area to provide a safe and quick means to deliver recreational and medical cannabis products to our customers,” says Shango Molalla owner Joi Moshberger.

Orders will be fulfilled from placements through the molalla.goshango.com website and by calling the Shango Molalla Delivery Line at (503) 744-2506. Orders should be paid on delivery with cash. The fee for the service is $5 for the first 30 days for those in the city limits of Molalla. For orders exceeding $50, the delivery fee is waived.

The new program follows state guidelines for delivery of marijuana products in the state of Oregon. There will be no delivery to hotels, bed and breakfast establishments or government-owned buildings. Medical patients will get priority. This will be the first approved delivery in the city of Molalla.

“We’re bringing in an exciting new dimension to our business that makes it not only convenient but safer for the consumer,” Moshberger said.

Delivery drivers will not carry large amounts of product or cash. Deliveries times are Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. To place an order, call (503) 829-7717 or (503) 744-2506.