Search Results for: colorado

MedPharm Awarded Colorado’s First Cannabis Research License

COLORADO:  MedPharm, a leading medical cannabis grow, R&D laboratory and compounding facility, announced today that it has been awarded the first cannabis research license by the state of Colorado. To get the license, the state looked at the applicant’s capabilities to successfully develop and conduct research.

The cannabis research license was created by the state to allow cannabis-related operators and researchers to study the plant and better understand what it offers. The application for the license included outlining research objectives and creating areas where medical research cannabis is grown specifically for research purposes.

“We have a strong research team of some of the best and brightest in the industry, and this cannabis research license will really help us in our quest to be a world leader in dosage formulation and product development,” Albert Gutierrez, CEO of MedPharm, says. “We are eager to look at what benefits the plant might offer for improving the human condition.”

Dr. Tyrell Towle, the director of chemistry for MedPharm with a PhD in medicinal and natural products chemistry, says that the cannabis research license will enable MedPharm to provide their high-quality dosage forms directly to study patients. “It will also allow us to perform Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) because we can supply placebos as well, which wasn’t previously allowed for,” he says. “We are now in a better position than any cannabis company to take on research partnerships and we welcome those who are interested in such partnerships.”

MedPharm currently makes three brands: Aliviar, a medically-focused brand that produces pharmaceutical grade dosage forms (www.aliviaralleviates.com); Become products for a mellow, balanced or elevated feeling (www.becomelifestyle.com); and Batch, an oil concentrate with higher percentages of THC for the cannabis connoisseur (www.batchextracts.com). “Our recent review of our strains shows a very rare and unique cannabinoid that we originally dismissed as interference. We were able to identify the cannabinoid and see its molecular structure, which is exciting,” Towle says.

Colorado: Retail Marijuana Sales Not Associated With Increased Youth Access Or Use

COLORADO:  The establishment of retail cannabis sales for adults is not associated with either increased marijuana access or use by young people, according to data published online in the journal Prevention Science.

A team of investigators with the University of Colorado, School of Public Health assessed marijuana use trends among a representative sample of Colorado high-school students for the years just prior to the implementation of retail sales and again 18-months later.

Authors reported: “There was an absence of significant effects for change in lifetime or past 30-day marijuana use. Among those reporting past 30-day use, frequent use and use on school property declined. There was a significant decline in the perceived harm associated with marijuana use, but we did not find a significant effect for perceived wrongfulness, perceived ease of access, or perceived parental disapproval.”

They concluded, “We did not find a significant effect associated with the introduction of legal sales of recreational marijuana to adults in Colorado on adolescent (illegal) use.”

The data is consistent with prior studies finding that neither the enactment of medical cannabis legalization nor the enactment of adult use regulation is independently associated with increased marijuana use by young people. Separate survey data released by the Department of Public Health and Environment last month reported that rates of marijuana use by Colorado teens have remained virtually unchanged following legalization, and are consistent with the national average.


For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “Adolescent marijuana use, marijuana-related perceptions, and use of other substances before and after initiation of retail marijuana sales in Colorado (2013-2015),” appears in Prevention Science.

Federal Government Reports Teen Marijuana Use In Colorado Still Has NOT Increased Since Legalization

Five years after Colorado voters decided to regulate marijuana for adult use, rates of current and lifetime use among high school students remain relatively unchanged and on par with national averages

COLORADO: A new federal report shows rates of teen marijuana use in Colorado have still not increased since voters decided to end marijuana prohibition in 2012 and start regulating it similarly to alcohol for adult use.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) found 19.6 percent of Colorado students are currently using marijuana (compared to 19.8 percent nationwide), down from 21.2 percent in 2015 and 22 percent in 2011, the year before voters approved Amendment 64. The rate of lifetime use dropped to 35.5 percent in 2017 (compared to 35.6 percent nationwide), down from 38 percent in 2015 and 39.5 percent in 2011.

The Colorado and nationwide data for 2017 are available at the CDC website. The CDC released the nationwide YRBS data late last week, and it appears to have released the state-level data sometime this week.

Statement from Marijuana Policy Project spokesperson Mason Tvert, who co-directed the campaign in support of Amendment 64:

“After five years of marijuana being legal for adults in Colorado, government surveys continue to find no increase in usage rates among high school students. This is very welcome news for Colorado, and it should be particularly welcome news for those who opposed the state’s legalization for fear it would lead to an explosion in teen use. Hopefully it will allay opponents’ concerns in other states where voters or lawmakers are considering proposals to legalize and regulate marijuana for adult use. Colorado is proof that you can prevent teen marijuana use without arresting thousands of responsible adult marijuana consumers every year. Rather than debating whether marijuana should be legal for adults, let’s focus on how we can regulate it and control it to make it less available to teens.”

U.S. Attorney Bob Troyer Issues Statement Regarding Marijuana Prosecutions in Colorado

COLORADO:  U.S. Attorney Bob Troyer of the District of Colorado has issued the following statement regarding marijuana prosecutions:

“Today the Attorney General rescinded the Cole Memo on marijuana prosecutions, and directed that federal marijuana prosecution decisions be governed by the same principles that have long governed all of our prosecution decisions.  The United States Attorney’s Office in Colorado has already been guided by these principles in marijuana prosecutions — focusing in particular on identifying and prosecuting those who create the greatest safety threats to our communities around the state.  We will, consistent with the Attorney General’s latest guidance, continue to take this approach in all of our work with our law enforcement partners throughout Colorado.”

incredibles, Colorado’s Top-Selling Cannabis Edibles Brand, Goes National

COLORADO: The same cannabis-infused edibles team that has created and propelled the incredibles cannabis brands (manufactured by Medically Correct, LLC. in Colorado) to the top-selling position in Colorado’s recreational marijuana market, will soon be available in multiple markets throughout the United States via strategic licensing deals via IP holding company, MC Brands, LLC.

incredibles’ innovative products became Colorado’s No. 1 edibles brand on the strength of the incredibles brands’ handcrafted chocolates, gummies and extracts. Now, through strategic partnerships and licensing agreements, the incredibles product lines are already being enjoyed across California and Nevada with plans for continued National and International expansion throughout 2018.

incredibles’ cannabis-infused edibles will be on sale in Oregon and Puerto Rico by the end of 2017 – and in IllinoisArizonaMichigan and more in 2018. Unique facilities in each market will manufacture the incredibles products in accordance with local laws and market demands.

“We can’t wait to deliver our incredibles quality to patients across the country,” said Bob Eschino, Founder and President of incredibles and MC Brands. “We’ve devoted nearly seven years to investing in our proprietary extraction methods, products, production software and genetics. The incredibles brand is finally ready to be introduced to the national stage.”

Founded in 2010, incredibles products quickly became a favorite among Colorado budtenders, patients and consumers. All these years later the incredibles brand is respected for its 360-degree approach, from growing its own cannabis and extracting its own marijuana concentrates – via sister company MC Machinery’s proprietary incredible Extractor – to developing and manufacturing a full line of products that include edibles, extracts, vape pens and more.

Colorado: Tax Revenues From The Legal Cannabis Industry Surpasses Half-Billion Dollars

COLORADO: Revenues from Colorado’s legal cannabis industry have surpassed over a half-billion dollars since retail sales began on January 1, 2014.

According to an analysis by VS Strategies, cannabis-specific taxes and fees have yielded $506,143,635 in state revenue over the past three and one-half years. (Local tax revenue was excluded from the analysis.) Much of the revenue raised has gone to fund school construction projects, school drop-out and substance abuse prevention programs, and grant funding.

The half-billion dollar total far exceeds initial projections. Tax revenue from legal cannabis sales in Oregon and Washington have also exceeded regulator’s initial expectations, In Nevada, where retail sales became legal on July 1, retailers reported over 40,000 transactions in just the first weekend. In Alaska, legal cannabis sales have generated $1.2 million dollars in tax revenue over the first eight months.

Colorado Has Backed Off Plans For Marijuana Clubs

By Kristen Wyatt, Associated Press

COLORADO: Colorado lawmakers have backed off plans to regulate marijuana clubs, saying the state would invite a federal crackdown by approving Amsterdam-style pot clubs.

The state House voted Thursday to amend a bill that would have set rules for how private pot clubs could work.

It was a dramatic reversal. Bring-your-own pot clubs had bipartisan support in the Legislature, and the measure had already cleared the GOP Senate.

But lawmakers bowed to Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper, who repeatedly warned lawmakers that he would veto a club measure if it allowed indoor pot-smoking. The governor also warned that clubs, and a separate proposal to allow pot delivery, might invite intervention from the U.S. Department of Justice.

“Given the uncertainty in Washington, this is not the time to be . trying to carve off new turf and expand markets and make dramatic statements about marijuana,” Hickenlooper told The Denver Post last month.

Sponsors of the club bill said that they had little choice but to back off, leaving Colorado with its current spotty club landscape.

Colorado already has about 30 private pot clubs, according to legislative analysts, but they operate under a patchwork of local regulations and are sometimes raided by law enforcement.

Clubs in Colorado frequently operate in a similar manner to pot clubs in states where pot isn’t legal, with small groups meeting up to smoke in a secret location members sometimes call “Dave’s House,” a reference to an old Cheech and Chong skit.

The House amendment passed Thursday effectively removes club regulations, and the remaining bits of the bill are relatively minor. The bill could face yet more changes before a final vote. Lawmakers who bemoaned the club bill’s demise cited U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who has hinted that states violating federal drug law won’t be tolerated.

“I’d like to see (a club bill) that goes much further, and that does a lot more, but in a year with Jeff Sessions, a small first step is better than no step at all,” Democratic Rep. Jonathan Singer said.

Not everyone agreed with the change, saying Colorado is wimping out by backing off.

“It only makes sense to allow people to have a place to where they can (smoke marijuana) where it’s controlled and confined,” said Republican Sen. Tim Neville, who sponsored a separate club bill that failed because it would have allowed clubs to sell the marijuana people would smoke, similar to a bar selling alcohol.

“We have legalized marijuana. Where do we want people to use it if not at home? On the street?”

The Colorado bill would have made it the first state to regulate clubs statewide

Alaska pot regulators decided earlier this month to delay action on a measure to allow on-site pot consumption at marijuana dispensaries, or “tasting rooms.”

Ballot measures approved by voters last year in California, Maine and the city of Denver would allow either on-site pot consumption or so-called “social use” clubs, but regulations for how those clubs would work haven’t been settled.

Colorado Set To Prohibit Marijuana Co-Op Growing Operations

By Kristen Wyatt, Associated Press

COLORADO: Colorado was set Monday to outlaw marijuana growing co-ops soon after the state Senate unanimously approved a bill making it a crime for people to cultivate recreational pot for other people.

The bill supported by the office of Gov. John Hickenlooper passed 35-0 but it was unclear when he would sign it. There are no state estimates on how many collective recreational marijuana growing operations exist in Colorado, though they are popular among users who share the cost of electricity, water and fertilizer to grow their pot.

Colorado legalized recreational marijuana in 2012, but it has a nagging black-market problem. Law enforcement and state lawmakers attribute the black-market problem in part to weak restrictions on who can grow pot.

The Colorado state constitution authorizes people over 21 to grow their own pot, or to assist someone else in growing pot. That language allows groups to designate a single “farmer” to care for their marijuana plants, allowing them to avoid pot taxes that approach 30 percent, depending on the jurisdiction.

But police groups and Hickenlooper, a Democrat, have called on lawmakers to curb the practice of assisting other recreational pot users.

The bill had already passed the House.  The governor plans to sign another bill this week in the state’s pot crackdown. It limits the number of marijuana plants that can be grown in a home to 12 plants, which would force medical marijuana users authorized to grow more than 12 plants to grow it in agricultural or commercial locations or to buy it from dispensaries that tax marijuana.

Hickenlooper plans to sign that bill this week, his office said.  The bill passed Monday also provides $6 million a year in marijuana tax revenues to give law enforcement agencies more money to investigate illegal pot growing operations.

Colorado To Cannabis Retailers: How We Doing?

COLORADO:  The State of Colorado wants to be a better partner it’s legally-licensed pot shops, and in an effort to better understand their needs has tapped the expertise of Clear Voice Research to conduct a first-ever research study.  Designed to help inform how the Colorado Department of Health and Environment can be a better partner to the state’s marijuana retailers, and make improvements to its Good to Know campaign, the state is scheduling 75-minute focus groups for April 10 and 11 across Colorado, and is seeking industry participants.  If you qualify for and complete the focus group you will be rewarded $60 cash.

Good To Know

The purpose of the study is to better understand customer experiences in predominantly recreational marijuana dispensaries across the state. For that reason, this survey be completed by staff members who work in the “front of house” and is responsible for handling customer interactions and transactions.

Think that’s you? Click HERE to continue. 

Not you, but you think your staff would be interested? Please forward this email along to them.

Your time and participation are greatly appreciated! If you have any questions or problems with the survey, please contact Kate directly at kate.flaherty@clearvoiceresearch.com or at 303-895-3596.

The fine print: This survey is being conducted by ClearVoice Research, Inc. an independent research firm based in Denver, Colorado. ClearVoice Research respects your privacy and any answers or information you share with us will remain completely confidential. This email contact is for research purposes only. Nothing you share with us will ever be used for sales or marketing purposes.

Colorado Government Reports $1.3 Billion In Marijuana Sales Generated Nearly $200 Million In Tax Revenue in 2016

COLORADO: The Marijuana Policy Project issued the following statement in response to the Colorado Department of Revenue’s announcement that $1.3 billion in regulated marijuana sales took place in calendar year 2016, generating nearly $200 million in state tax revenue. These figures do not include millions of dollars in revenue generated by local taxes on marijuana.

For more information, click.

Statement from Mason Tvert, the Denver-based director of communications for the Marijuana Policy Project:

“Over one billion dollars in marijuana sales that once took place in the underground market were instead conducted in regulated businesses this year. The state received nearly $200 million in marijuana tax revenue, whereas just a decade ago it was receiving zero. Hopefully this will be a wake-up call for the 42 states that still choose to force marijuana sales into the criminal market and forego millions of dollars in tax revenue.

“Marijuana tax revenue is not going to cover the state’s budget, but it is going to cover important programs and services that would otherwise be left out of it. This money is just the tip of the iceberg. The state is also reaping the invaluable public health and safety benefits of replacing an underground market with a tightly regulated system. Marijuana is now being sold in licensed businesses, rather than out on the street. It is being properly tested, packaged, and labeled, and it is only being sold to adults who show proof of age. The system is working.”