Fight continues over cannabis law for ill New Jersey children

NEW JERSEY — Parents who have been fighting for changes in the state’s medical marijuana law so they can provide the drug to their severely ill children took their campaign to Gov. Christie’s office Thursday, armed with more than 2,100 letters from supporters.

In New Jersey, sick children are allowed to use cannabis under the three-year-old law, but strict regulations and problems in implementation have made it impossible for any of them to obtain marijuana.

The governor has until Thursday to sign or veto a bill that would change three of the more cumbersome requirements, including one that bans edible cannabis, the type children can easily use.

Christie was not at the Statehouse when the letters were delivered, and in the past rebuffed the parents’ requests for a personal meeting.

On his radio program, Ask the Governor, on New Jersey 101.5 FM Wednesday, Christie said of the bill: “I think we’ve got to be very careful. . . . It’s on my desk. I’m examining it. I’m hoping to come up with a solution that will be helpful to these families, but also helpful to all families in New Jersey so that we don’t become Colorado or California.” He has criticized those states for lax regulations.

In other remarks Christie made last month, he said that New Jersey’s program was limited to patients with a terminal or debilitating illness, but that when it came to children, “I’m very reluctant.”

Meghan Wilson of Scotch Plains, Union County, said she wanted to meet with him personally to explain that her 2-year-old, Vivian, suffers from daily seizures that have not responded to various barbiturates and other prescribed drugs. Marijuana would be a last resort for her child, she said.

Parents of children in Colorado and California who have the same rare condition, Dravet syndrome, have reported success with medical marijuana, and Wilson would like to see whether it works for her daughter.J

who have been fighting for changes in the state’s medical marijuana law so they can provide the drug to their severely ill children took their campaign to Gov. Christie’s office Thursday, armed with more than 2,100 letters from supporters.

In New Jersey, sick children are allowed to use cannabis under the three-year-old law, but strict regulations and problems in implementation have made it impossible for any of them to obtain marijuana.

The governor has until Thursday to sign or veto a bill that would change three of the more cumbersome requirements, including one that bans edible cannabis, the type children can easily use.

Christie was not at the Statehouse when the letters were delivered, and in the past rebuffed the parents’ requests for a personal meeting.

On his radio program, Ask the Governor, on New Jersey 101.5 FM Wednesday, Christie said of the bill: “I think we’ve got to be very careful. . . . It’s on my desk. I’m examining it. I’m hoping to come up with a solution that will be helpful to these families, but also helpful to all families in New Jersey so that we don’t become Colorado or California.” He has criticized those states for lax regulations.

In other remarks Christie made last month, he said that New Jersey’s program was limited to patients with a terminal or debilitating illness, but that when it came to children, “I’m very reluctant.”

Meghan Wilson of Scotch Plains, Union County, said she wanted to meet with him personally to explain that her 2-year-old, Vivian, suffers from daily seizures that have not responded to various barbiturates and other prescribed drugs. Marijuana would be a last resort for her child, she said.

Parents of children in Colorado and California who have the same rare condition, Dravet syndrome, have reported success with medical marijuana, and Wilson would like to see whether it works for her daughter.

Read full article @ The Philadelphia Inquirer