New Study Finds People Turned to Cannabis During the Pandemic to Feel Happier

COLORADO: A 2021 survey finds a positive correlation between the number of COVID-19 cases and demand for medical cannabis; more than half of patients said they used cannabis “to feel happy.”

— 55% of medical cannabis patients primarily use to feel ‘happy’

— Patient desire to feel ‘happy’ via medical cannabis use grew 46% in the past year

— Study suggests exogenous shocks like COVID-19, elections, protests and riots positively influence medical cannabis demand

Did the stressors of COVID-19 drive more Americans to use medical cannabis as an alternative tool for managing their mental health? A new national study exploring this question found a positive correlation between national demand for medical cannabis and the national number of COVID-19 cases; in other words, as cases increased, so did medical cannabis use. And whereas the most common reason for obtaining a medical card has historically been for chronic pain, the majority of medical cannabis patients who applied for medical cards over the past year cited psychological purposes, with 55% of patients saying their main reason for using cannabis was “to feel ‘happy.”

These findings are part of a national study conducted by Veriheal, the healthcare enterprise behind the nation’s largest medical marijuana application platform, in partnership with graduate research scholars from the London School of EconomicsUniversity of Southern California and University of Maryland; and the CREA (Cultivating Research Education and Advocacy) Group, a business development and research firm dedicated to psychoactive drugs like cannabinoids, psychedelics, and entheogens. The findings were officially presented to the American Chemical Society, a congressionally chartered non-profit leading research in the global chemical enterprise, at their April 2021 national conference.

Conducted between January 2020 and March 2021, the study investigated medical cannabis interest and adoption by desired effect across region, sex and age group, in relation to COVID-19 cases in America as reported by the official COVID-19 CDC data tracker.

Patient data was obtained from surveys on the Veriheal telemedicine platform, which connects prospective cannabis patients to state-certified cannabis doctors to facilitate and streamline the medical marijuana (MMJ) card application process.

How CBD Can Help with Skin Problems

Anyone who’s suffered throughout their life with uncooperative skin has probably looked at many solutions to their troubles. Once they’ve exhausted other more obvious solutions, they may then cast a jaded eye towards skin cream that includes CBD as a significant ingredient.

What they may not understand clearly is whether a cream containing CBD will be helpful to them or not. Therefore, this article is aimed at providing some clarity on this issue.

One Itch or Three?

While it’s natural for the skin to itch when it is healing, it’s not as common or comfortable when that’s not the root cause. In which case, you’re trying to not scratch the area, but the itching is driving you’re a bit nutty!

If you’ve already tried antihistamine tablets and it didn’t do anything for you, then perhaps a cream with CBD will be worth trying now?

How will CBD help in this situation? Good question. What it does is disable the signal that’s communicating from the brain to your skin to create the itchy sensation. As a result, it’s felt less or removed entirely.

Protect the Skin from Damage

When out and about in the spring and summer months, being exposed to sunlight is almost inevitable. UV rays can cause cellular damage to the skin that’s irreversible and will eventually catch up with you. This is why sunbathing is detrimental, no matter how attractive a tan is.

The use of CBD cream can assist in preventing free radicals from UV rays that cause damage to the skin. When there’s no sun cream to hand, this alternative is great.

Remedy for Skin Breakouts

Chronic skin problems including minor to major breakouts are a real bugbear. Even if you’re a woman and able to cover over them with makeup, it’s still far from perfect. It’s also possible that the makeup will cause further skin irritation that won’t help either.

CBD cream helps with skin issues because it can reduce the build-up of oils on or below the surface that cause blocked pores in the first place. For people who suffer from an excess of oil on the skin that frequently creates fresh skin dilemmas, the use of CBD creams can reduce the frequency and severity of skin problems.

Avoid Aging as Rapidly

Avoiding aging is important to all of us. While we cannot stop the passage of time, we can at least try to stop our skin from looking significantly older.

CBD contains many antioxidants that shield the skin from harm including environmental-related damage. UV rays and air pollution are prevented from prematurely aging the skin when the cream is applied. Dark areas, fine lines, and pronounced wrinkles may be delayed as a result.

While no treatment is a cure-all for the way that the environment, pollution, and UV rays can ravage the skin, CBD cream provides added defense against them. Along with an effective cleaning and cleansing regimen, it can prove effective in keeping the skin looking its best.

 

 

Cannabis Reduces Blood Pressure In Older Adults, According To Ben-Gurion University Of The Negev Researchers

ISRAEL:  A new discovery by researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and its affiliated Soroka University Medical Center shows that medical cannabis may reduce blood pressure in older adults.

The study, published in the European Journal of Internal Medicine, is the first of its kind to focus on the effect of cannabis on blood pressure, heart rate and metabolic parameters in adults 60 and above with hypertension.

“Older adults are the fastest growing group of medical cannabis users, yet evidence on cardiovascular safety for this population is scarce,” says Dr. Ran Abuhasira of the BGU Faculty of Health Sciences, one of Israel’s leading medical faculties, and the BGU-Soroka Cannabis Clinical Research Institute. “This study is part of our ongoing effort to provide clinical research on the actual physiological effects of cannabis over time.”

Patients were evaluated using 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, ECG, blood tests, and body measurements ─both before and three months after initiating cannabis therapy.

In the study, researchers found a significant reduction in 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure values, with the lowest point occurring three hours after ingesting cannabis either orally via oil extracts or by smoking. Patients showed reductions in blood pressure in both daytime and nighttime, with more significant changes at night.

The BGU researchers theorize that the relief from pain, the indication for prescription cannabis in most patients, may also have contributed to a reduction in blood pressure.

“Cannabis research is in its early stages and BGU is at the forefront of evaluating clinical use based on scientific studies,” says Doug Seserman, chief executive officer of American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. “This new study is one of several that has been published recently by BGU on the medicinal benefits of cannabis.”

Additional researchers who participated in the study include: Prof. Victor Novack, director of the BGU-Soroka Cannabis Clinical Research Institute and BGU-Soroka Clinical Research Center and Research Authority; Prof. Yosef Haviv, director of the Department of Nephrology at Soroka; Prof. Merav Leiba, Prof. Adi Leiba and Dr. Larisa Ryvo of the Assuta Ashdod Academic Medical Center.

Over Half Of Cannabis Users With Parkinson’s Disease Report Clinical Benefits

A survey in Germany found over 8% of patients with Parkinson’s disease are using cannabis products and more than half experienced beneficial clinical effects, reports the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease

NETHERLANDS:  With medicinal cannabis now legalized in many parts of the world, there is growing interest in its use to alleviate symptoms of many illnesses including Parkinson’s disease (PD). According to results of a survey of PD patients in Germany in the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, over 8% of patients with PD reported using cannabis products and more than half of those users (54%) reported a beneficial clinical effect.

Cannabis products containing THC (tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychoactive compound of cannabis) can be prescribed in Germany when previous therapies are unsuccessful or not tolerated, and where cannabis can be expected with not a very unlikely chance to relieve disabling symptoms. CBD (pure cannabidiol, derived directly from the hemp plant, a cousin of the marijuana plant) is available without a prescription from pharmacies and on the internet.

“Medical cannabis was legally approved in Germany in 2017 when approval was given for therapy-resistant symptoms in severely affected patients independent of diagnosis and without clinical evidence-based data,” explained lead investigator Prof. Dr. med. Carsten Buhmann, Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. “PD patients fulfilling these criteria are entitled to be prescribed medical cannabis, but there are few data about which type of cannabinoid and which route of administration might be promising for which PD patient and which symptoms. We also lack information about the extent to which the PD community is informed about medicinal cannabis and whether they have tried cannabis and, if so, with what result.”

Investigators aimed to assess patient perceptions of medicinal cannabis as well as evaluate the experiences of patients already using cannabis products. They performed a nationwide, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey among members of the German Parkinson Association (Deutsche Parkinson Vereinigung e.V.), which is the largest consortium of PD patients in German-speaking countries with nearly 21,000 members. Questionnaires were sent out in April 2019 with the association’s membership journal and were also distributed in the investigators’ clinic.

Over 1,300 questionnaires were analyzed; results showed that interest in the PD community in medical cannabis was high, but knowledge about different types of products was limited. Fifty-one percent of respondents were aware of the legality of medicinal cannabis, and 28% were aware of the various routes of administration (inhaling versus oral administration), but only 9% were aware of the difference between THC and CBD.

More than 8% of patients were already using cannabinoids and more than half of these users (54%) reported that it had a beneficial clinical effect. The overall tolerability was good. Over 40% of users reported that it helped manage pain and muscle cramps, and more than 20% of users reported a reduction of stiffness (akinesia), freezing, tremor, depression, anxiety, and restless legs. Patients reported that inhaled cannabis products containing THC were more efficient in treating stiffness than oral products containing CBD but were slightly less well tolerated.

Patients using cannabis tended to be younger, living in large cities, and more aware of the legal and clinical aspects of medicinal cannabis. Sixty-five percent of non-users were interested in using medicinal cannabis, but lack of knowledge and fear of side effects were reported as main reasons for not trying it.

“Our data confirm that PD patients have a high interest in treatment with medicinal cannabis but lacked knowledge about how to take it and especially the differences between the two main cannabinoids, THC and CBD,” noted Prof. Dr. med. Buhmann. “Physicians should consider these aspects when advising their patients about treatment with medicinal cannabis. The data reported here may help physicians decide which patients could benefit, which symptoms could be addressed, and which type of cannabinoid and route of administration might be suitable.”

“Cannabis intake might be related to a placebo effect because of high patient expectations and conditioning, but even that can be considered as a therapeutic effect. It has to be stressed, though, that our findings are based on subjective patient reports and that clinically appropriate studies are urgently needed,” he concluded.

Bastiaan R. Bloem, MD, PhD, Director, Radboudumc Center of Expertise for Parkinson & Movement Disorders, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, and Co-Editor-in Chief of the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, added: “These findings are interesting in that they confirm a widespread interest among patients in the use of cannabis as a potential treatment for people living with PD. It is important to emphasize that more research is needed before cannabis can be prescribed as a treatment, and that guidelines currently recommend against the use of cannabis, even as self-medication, because the efficacy is not well established, and because there are safety concerns (adverse effects include among others sedation and hallucinations). As such, the present paper mainly serves to emphasize the need for carefully controlled clinical trials to further establish both the efficacy and safety of cannabis treatment.”

NIH Study Suggests Using Cannabis While Trying To Conceive May Reduce Pregnancy Chances

MARYLAND:  Women who use marijuana could have a more difficult time conceiving a child than women who do not use marijuana, suggests a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. Marijuana use among the women’s partners—which could have influenced conception rates—was not studied. The researchers were led by Sunni L. Mumford, Ph.D., of the Epidemiology Branch in NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. The study appears in Human Reproduction.

The women were part of a larger group trying to conceive after one or two prior miscarriages. Women who said they used cannabis products—marijuana or hashish—in the weeks before pregnancy, or who had positive urine tests for cannabis use, were around 40% less likely to conceive per monthly cycle than women who did not use cannabis. The authors noted that although the findings suggest cannabis could affect women’s fertility, they should be tempered with caution as the study observed a relatively small number of cannabis users. However, the authors say their results suggest that women trying to conceive should exercise caution with cannabis use until more definitive evidence is available.

The researchers analyzed data from a broader study of more than 1,200 women ages 18 to 40 with one or two pregnancy losses. The women participated in the study for up to six monthly cycles while attempting pregnancy and throughout pregnancy if conception occurred. After enrolling in the study, the women responded to a questionnaire asking if they had used marijuana, pot, or hashish in the past 12 months, with responses ranging from never, rarely, occasionally, sometimes, often, to daily. Each woman also provided urine samples for analysis when they first entered the study and after six months if they did not conceive or at the time of positive pregnancy test if they conceived.

A total of 62 women (5%) either had a positive urine test or responded that they had used cannabis before conception.

For each monthly cycle, women who had used cannabis while trying to conceive were 41% less likely to conceive than non-users. Similarly, a smaller proportion of cannabis users than non-users became pregnant during the study—42% versus 66%. The authors found no differences in miscarriage rates between users and non-users who had achieved pregnancy.

The authors noted that, compared to non-users, cannabis users also had differences in reproductive hormones involved in ovulation. These differences could potentially have influenced their likelihood of conception. Specifically, users had higher levels of luteinizing hormone and a higher proportion of luteinizing hormone to follicle stimulating hormone.

The authors also noted that animal studies had found that cannabis use could alter the lining of the uterus, making it less likely an embryo to implant and establish a pregnancy. Until more information is available, the authors said, women trying to become pregnant should be aware that cannabis could potentially affect their pregnancy chances.

Reference
Mumford SL et al. Cannabis use while trying to conceive: a prospective cohort study evaluating associations with fecundability, live birth, and pregnancy loss. Human Reproduction. 2020. doi: 10.1093/humrep/deaa355

About the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD): NICHD leads research and training to understand human development, improve reproductive health, enhance the lives of children and adolescents, and optimize abilities for all. For more information, visit https://www.nichd.nih.gov.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit https://www.nih.gov.

Is Marijuana A Better Alternative To Cigarettes?

Many smokers choose to make the switch from cigarettes to marijuana, whether it’s to simply give up smoking forever or to get more of a “buzz” from an inhalant. Marijuana and tobacco are both derived from naturally-occurring plants, but there’s a common misconception that “naturally-occurring” substances are always healthy. This simply isn’t the case.

Comparing marijuana and cigarettes requires some facts about both and their effects on the body, so you can choose for yourself. The answer to the question is a matter of personal preference, but you’ll find an in-depth comparison below for your consideration. If you’re a smoker, there are plenty of alternative products available aside from marijuana to get you off of cigarettes, including tobacco-less chew (Black Buffalo is a good start), CBD oils, and more.

Cigarette Facts

To get started, let’s look at some cigarette facts. Cigarettes are one of the most deadly and destructive products on the market to individual and public health and even the environment. Every year, the tobacco industry is responsible for millions of tons of litter, toxic waste, and thousands of deforested acres to make way for massive tobacco farms. This environmental damage affects wildlife, ecosystems, and perhaps more importantly, waterways.

You see, the tobacco industry is a fan of pesticides and fertilizers. After all, the crops can be worth billions of dollars in the final product form, so they must be protected and provide the highest yields possible. The problem with these chemical fertilizers and pesticides is that they’re loaded with dangerous and toxic chemicals, heavy metals, and other substances that offer a serious health hazard. And all of those nasty things end up in your cigarettes.

Cigarettes are said to contain anywhere from 3,000-7,000 chemicals, and at least 70 of those are known carcinogens (cancer-causing). Cigarettes have been linked to dozens of cancers and can cause serious damage to internal organs such as the heart and lungs. In fact, smoking makes you twice as likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke because of its effects on the heart and blood vessels.

When you inhale cigarette smoke, the chemicals affect the red blood cells; specifically, the hemoglobin. Your blood thickens, and those platelets have a much more difficult time carrying and delivering oxygen to important organs and tissues. Not to mention, your blood pressure spikes, which causes serious strain on cardiac muscles and the inner lining of blood vessels. The bottom line?  Every time you take a drag on a cigarette, you’re taking minutes off of your life. And that’s a fact.

Marijuana Facts

Marijuana is a strain of Cannabis that contains higher concentrations of THC, the psychoactive compound responsible for marijuana’s classic “high” sensation. Users report feelings of euphoria and heightened physical sensation, as well as serious impairment. Let’s look at some marijuana facts to properly compare it to cigarettes.

Marijuana does not contain the enormous number of chemicals that tobacco does. While it has found use in some medical applications to help manage things like pain and anxiety, the exact benefits of inhaling marijuana smoke are still being studied. What we do know is that it shows great promise in pain management and perhaps even managing conditions like depression.

That being said, there’s a common misconception that you can’t become addicted to marijuana. Let’s clarify. While you can become chemically addicted to nicotine, you likely won’t become chemically addicted to THC, but that doesn’t mean you won’t become dependent on it for everyday life. You can become dependent on just about anything that brings you joy.

Is It Better?

The question still remains whether marijuana is a “better” alternative to cigarettes. The short answer? No. The lungs are designed to inhale oxygen, and that’s the only thing that should be entering them. Foreign substances can be dangerous, and hot smoke from any inhaled plant matter can cause damage to important lung structures.

Not to mention, marijuana is still illegal at the federal level, despite being legalized in several states. That means you could potentially be prosecuted for possessing, growing, or using it.

Conclusion

Perhaps a better question to ask is, “what could I be doing instead of smoking?” Many of us suffer from a helpless addiction to a harmful vice, but even replacing that vice with something similar but “less harmful” can still be harmful in the end. Perhaps we should instead focus on art, literature, and other noble pursuits to better ourselves and spend our time more wisely. Vices, however minor they may seem, can lead us down a road we do not want to take. A more focused approach to our personal health will make us a happier, healthier society as a whole, which is something we definitely need during this pandemic. Don’t put yourself at risk for something that only damages your body!

Cannabinoids In Cannabis Help Treat Alzheimer’s Disease

In honor of World Alzheimer’s Month, we’ve asked educator/author Curt Robbins to provide an overview of how the cannabinoids in cannabis can be helpful in treating this mental illness.

By Curt Robbins

Discovered in 1906 by Dr. Alois (Aloysius) Alzheimer, a German psychiatrist and neuropathologist, Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Alzheimer stumbled upon the ailment when performing an autopsy on the brain of a woman who died of a then-unknown mental illness.

Surprisingly, Alzheimer’s disease begins damaging the brain up to a decade prior to the onset of any form of short-term memory loss—the stereotypical first discernible symptom of the disease that leads to a positive diagnosis.

The cannabinoids in cannabis help treat Alzheimer’s disease via a mechanism involving the removal of the excess plaques and tau tangles from the brain. Research indicates that some cannabinoids may transport these damaging plaques through the blood-brain barrier and out of the brain. Consumption of cannabinoids to remove plaque from the brain may result in improvement, but significant progress is strongly dependent on the progress of the disease with respect to how large a portion of the brain has suffered damage.

Formal research, anecdotal evidence, and personal testimonials have revealed that treatment with cannabinoids may slow or even halt the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. In some cases, memory function may be partially or mostly restored.

Read the entire article here:

Copyright © 2020 by Curt Robbins. All Rights Reserved.

Top 5 Plant-Based Foods To Relieve Stress And Anxiety Instantly

 

Caring about nature and the food choices you make to preserve the environment is a good deed to do. However, continually worrying about what foods you’re eating and omitting can put you in a stressful state. Other than this, there are many more things that can be the cause of stress, and after one thing leads into another, you quickly find yourself into a hyperventilated state unable to settle down.

Whether you ate due to stress or eating made you stressed, you can change things by eating to de-stress. The following are some healthy plant-based foods that can help with anxiety and stress rapidly:

Nuts and Seeds

Nuts and seeds come from responsible regions and offer some of the essential nutrients needed in daily life. Moreover, they offer healthy counterparts of some of the nutrients, including proteins, fats, and carbohydrates. Proteins and omega 3, iron, zinc, and other elements varying in different nuts and seeds aid the brain in the functioning and handling stressful tasks better. Some helpful nuts and seeds are peanuts, walnuts, and cashews; and chia, pumpkin, and hemp seeds, respectively.

Beans and Greens

Leafy greens and beans are already on the side of the healthy foods to eat and do incredible benefits to the body and brain. They do good to the overall health as they include several vitamins and minerals like folate, iron, magnesium, vitamin c, and b. You can add greens in your favorite dishes or make smoothies consisting of spinach, kale, asparagus, broccoli, and Brussel sprouts and chickpeas as beans. These foods effortlessly relax your mind and take away stress whenever consumed due to the rich nutrients they offer.

Cannabis

Speaking of leafy greens, a plant that provides numerous advantages and properties is also cannabis. Although its products are more widely used to relieve stress, the results from eating raw yields or mixed with home-cooked meals are incredible. The component known as CBD relieves stress and anxiety with anti-inflammatory properties. However, when it is combined with THC, action happens fast. And both of them are found in several strains of cannabis, read this article to find some of the best ones.

Oat

Oats or oatmeal may be a conventional breakfast item, but the influence it holds to provide to your body and mind is immense. This is the only superfood you need to help you lower cholesterol and blood pressure to a healthy level and also soothe your mind and de-stress. It contains some of the fantastic nutrients that can immediately relieve stress and anxiety, including complex carbohydrates and serotonin that take your brain to a feel-good state.

Teas

A food item that also feels calming to think about is teas that have amazing pacifying properties. Teas help calm down heightened emotions instantly and reduce levels of anxiety and stress. All kinds of teas work in accomplishing the task of relieving stress for good. You can just pick your favorite from a wide variety of exquisite tastes. Chamomile works best with reliving stress while other teas, including black, green, peppermint, and lavender, are also great and also provide additional benefits like help with sleep or invigorating mind.

Is Cannabis A Cure For Coronavirus?

MJNews Network Exclusive Report

By Lorelei Caudill

Are we potentially growing our own cure for this global pandemic?

Is the United States the most well-equipped country to potentially conduct one of the most extensive case studies in our world’s history?

Let’s take a more in-depth look at why the answer may be a yes.

In these times of uncertainty, globally, we are starting to look at science and data to help guide critical decisions to determine our new social norm needs. Cannabis is under the microscope on a global level since the beginning of this pandemic.

We are leaning on technology, data, and statistics on how and when to reopen our states and communities. We look to science to help us learn more about how the virus is spread. Some of the world’s best doctors have now taught us “How to wash our hands.” It seems a little crazy, right?

When we think of COVID19 and Cannabis, we need to do the same and lean scientific data from successful cannabis studies in the past (which is quite a bit, despite what many think) and watch the continuing studies with COVID19 scientists are conducting today on a global level.

Initially, some may say, “Nope, I consume cannabis, and I tested positive” (to be honest in my current COVID Survey has only been one person since I published on March 21st).

See the source image

Disregarding Cannabis as a potential to help with this global pandemic, is like saying you wash your hands, and you still contracted COVID19.

Realistically everyone’s next questions would be based on scientific data:

  1. What did you wash your hands with?
  2. How long did you wash your hands?
  3. How often did you wash your hands?

We need to think the same way and apply theory and scientific data to Cannabis:

  1. What cannabis product did you consume?
  2. How frequently did you consume Cannabis?
  3. What form factor of Cannabis do you consume? (inhaled, edibles, tinctures, etc.)

Cannabis plants are not all created equally. The plant contains more than 110 possible cannabinoids and over 120 terpenes, all of which work differently in the human body. To add yet another layer of complexity, research has found certain cannabinoids work differently with other cannabinoids/terpenes. This variable is called the entourage effect.

According to Strain Genie :

In addition to how Cannabis interacts with our human endocannabinoid system, there are other scientific data points to consider, our individual DNA. Research Scientist Nicco Reggente Ph.D., co-founder of Strain Genie, takes cannabis science to a whole new level by providing insight and data required to understand how we can use human DNA to further analyze how an individual metabolizes Cannabis, including the infamous intoxicating compound THC.

Strain Genie analyzes over 450 genetic biomarkers to recommend the best consumption methods and ratios per consumer. With this type of data and information, we can be less fearful of Cannabis as a potential aid in COVID19, knowing we will not have to walk around high or heavily sedated to prevent contraction and spread. It may even help you wash your hands a little longer!

Strain Genie uses DNA biomarkers to align cannabinoids and terpenes within the cannabis plant the help tame or mitigate much of the “high” with Cannabis by providing a custom THC: CBD ratio along with additional terpenes to pair when looking to combat things like cannabis-induced anxiety in individuals that may also be genetically predisposed to having depression, PTSD, or OCD.

Let’s Put Actual COVID19 Under A Microscope With Cannabis:

Next, let’s apply this potential:

As you can see, the public-facing laboratory test for each harvest in our legal markets holds valuable data.  This is the type of data we can use to help propel us forward when thinking about Cannabis and the potential with COVID19. Cannabis consumers may request their products laboratory test upon purchase.

Could this lead to one of the most extensive human case studies in cannabis history?

Slight curveball, not every state-level legal growing operation, is required to provide a terpene content and potency profile. Currently, California, Michigan, Connecticut, and our nation’s capital District of Columbia are the only places that require a terpene profile on top of the cannabinoid profile per harvest; this makes them prime candidates to further research!

In closing, I believe we are much closer than ever to have the ability to quickly link cannabis COVID19 when looking for ways to prevent the spread, and potential treatments. We may find Cannabis as a temporary relief until a vaccine is created. This would allow us to open up more safely and to mitigate much of the risk. The world’s scientists, cultivators, and our states rigorous regulations and testing requirements that have progressed us forward while leaving a valuable data trail in a moment when time is not the most kind.

Caveats – AS ALWAYS PLEASE CONSULT WITH YOUR PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN BEFORE PURCHASING OR CONSUMING CANNABIS BASED PRODUCTS

  • Smoking cannabis is unfavorable, regardless.
  • Consuming cannabis may pose a risk to pregnant women.
  • Products with THC are not recommended for consumers with some cancer types where tumors are present.
  • Be aware Cannabis is known to have interactions with other medications.

About Lorelei Caudill – Cannabis Science 101 – www.cannabisque.org

I am a mother, a sister, a daughter, and a granddaughter. My family and I have personal experience with the medicinal value of Cannabis.

Over the past few years, I have dedicated much of my spare time to understand the science behind the “how” and “why” Cannabis works with the human body. Why do some consumers benefit from the medicinal value of Cannabis while others do not? Why would one product have little to no results, while others not only relieve symptoms but help with the root condition?

My goal with Cannabisque is to provide an unbiased platform of educational content created directly from highly regulated studies to educate Cannabis curious consumers globally as we learn more about this miracle plant the promise scientists are documenting in research today.

Researchers At Israel’s Rambam Hospital:  Cannabis May Help Severely Ill COVID-19 Patients

ISRAEL: Rambam Health Care Campus is leading cannabis research that could be helpful in the treatment of severely ill COVID-19 patients. Clinical trials have been scheduled.

Researchers in the Center for Cannabis Research at Rambam Health Care Campus, led by the center’s Director Dr. Igal Louria-Hayon, hope to study the effects of cannabis use on severely ill COVID-19 patients in clinical trials scheduled to begin in the next few months. Preliminary investigations indicate that several types of cannabis may have the potential to prevent the life-threatening cascade of inflammation in these patients. Information gathered to date indicates that a major cause of death in COVID-19 patients is the storm of “cytokines” released when the body’s immune system recognizes a new and threatening invader. This may result in an out-of-control inflammatory response which worsens the illness and can even lead to death.

Active components in cannabis activate an internal system in the body that has been dubbed the “endocannabinoid system.” Since the body naturally produces and utilizes substances similar in structure to the active components of cannabis, it may also respond broadly to the cannabis plant itself. A Biobank database of COVID-19 patients at Rambam will help facilitate research into the possible therapeutic effects of cannabis in battling the deadly virus.

“Cannabis has known anti-inflammatory properties, and we have been conducting advanced research on the use of cannabis to treat other diseases with widespread inflammatory responses. At the outbreak of the COVID-19 epidemic, we directed our efforts and experience to join the world-wide battle against this epidemic,” said Dr. Louria-Hayon.

Dr. Louria-Hayon, researchers in the Cannabis Research Center investigated multiple cannabis strains, and they were able to narrow the field to about 15 species strains that appear to have the ability to prevent the intense inflammatory response experienced by some COVID-19 patients. “We detected signs that cannabinoids contribute to the sophisticated fabric network of intercellular communications,” Dr. Louria-Hayon said. “Intercellular communication based on cannabis-like substances also exist in the immune system,” said Dr. Louria-Hayon. “If we understand how cannabinoid components are used in intercellular communication, we can help influence this communication in the event of a disease, to disrupt it or empower the communication to convey desired messages.”

Dr. Louria-Hayon explained that in order to understand the mechanism of the effect of cannabis on COVID-19, researchers are drawing on inflammatory cell samples from COVID-19 patients. “For the first time in Israel, a laboratory experiment has been undertaken to explore the effect of various types of cannabinoids on the white blood cells of COVID-19 patients,” he notes. Each cannabis strain has hundreds of active substances, and Dr. Louria-Hayon stated that they want to examine the receptors to which these substances bond, the cellular messages that are communicated, and the extent to which cannabinoids reduce the inflammatory response. “We believe that we will be able to accelerate the pace of investigation and move more rapidly to clinical applications, due to access to the National Biobank at Rambam,” said Dr. Louria-Hayon.

The purpose of the study is to treat the inflammatory storm as it develops and before the patient’s condition deteriorates and a ventilator is needed. “We hope that by decoding the cannabinoid activity mechanism during inflammatory storms, we can treat COVID-19 patients where conventional drugs have failed,” Dr. Louria-Hayon said. “The uniqueness of our cannabis treatments is based on our understanding of the mechanisms of cannabinoids activity and scientific findings.”

Dr. Shlomit Yehudai-Reshef, Director of the Rambam Medical Research Institute, explains, “We saw the establishment of a Biobank pool for COVID-19 research as essential to securing rapid answers and accelerating critically needed research. Blood samples are the most accessible resource for continuous sampling—to understand biological processes during the disease and to develop vaccines and drugs.”

“At Rambam, dozens of COVID-19 patients have been hospitalized in recent weeks, from whom blood samples were collected for clinical and research purposes”, she said, noting that “despite the complexity and high risk, we found a safe way to separate the white blood cells, including the immune cells from verified patients.”