OLCC Commission Approves Rules on Revoking Marijuana Worker Permits and Harvest Notification

OREGON: The Oregon Liquor Control Commission today approved a rule permitting the agency to revoke the Marijuana Worker Permit of any permittee determined to be deliberately selling marijuana to a minor. The action adds to a series of steps taken by the Commission to prevent the sale of marijuana items to minors.

The Commission also approved a rule requiring marijuana producers to provide the OLCC advance notice when harvesting their cannabis crop.

In late 2017 the Commission began minor decoy operations to determine if retailers were selling marijuana products to minors. In early 2018, because of poor compliance among retailers, the Commission stiffened the penalties for retail licensees selling marijuana items to minors. After the increased fines were put in place compliance rates improved, but the Commission is increasingly seeing cases with repeated violations.

“Today’s action holds individuals with Marijuana Worker Permits as responsible as our licensees because it puts in jeopardy their right to work in the legal cannabis industry,” said Paul Rosenbaum, OLCC Commission Chair. “However it’s a privilege—not a right—to hold a license. We want to be in a position to take stronger action against those who don’t take the privilege of their license seriously, and will be addressing strengthening our sanctions in an upcoming session.”

The harvest notification rule is designed to reduce opportunities for legally produced cannabis to be diverted to the illegal market. The rule requires licensed producers to notify the OLCC by 9 AM any morning the producer decides to harvest their crop.

“We’ve designed this rule to be seamless because we want producers to make this a part of their normal business operations,” said Steven Marks, OLCC Executive Director. “At the same time it serves a very important function to preserve the integrity of our regulated market to keep what’s produced by the regulated market in the regulated market. That is exactly why we have worked hard with industry, law enforcement and public officials to make this a rule that can bring a sense of transparent accountability to the harvest.”

In other action the Commissioners of the OLCC approved the following fines and/or marijuana license suspensions based on stipulated settlements:

Lunchbox Alchemy, will pay a fine of $1,485 or serve a nine-day recreational marijuana processor license suspension for one violation.

The violation is for the licensee or its employees, agents, or representatives failed to record in METRC Cannabis Tracking System (CTS) within 10 days of licensure, information regarding the usable marijuana, cannabinoid concentrates, extracts or products that the Commission permitted to be transferred in from Licensee’s medical marijuana processing site inventory.

Licensee is CHC Laboratories, LLC; Cameron Yee, Managing Member.

Sensible Cannabis Company in Medfordwill pay a fine of $6,105 or serve a 37-day recreational marijuana retailer license suspension for two violations.

The first violation is for the licensee failing to keep surveillance recordings for a minimum of 90 calendar days.

The second violation is for the licensee or the licensee’s employees, agents, servants or representatives failing to store marijuana items in such a manner that the items were only accessible to authorized representatives until such time as the final sale to a consumer was completed when an edible item and jars of usable marijuana flower were left unsecured on the retail counter.

Licensee is FJ Ventures LLC.; Steven Fields, Managing Member; SR Ventures Inc., Member.

Pendleton Cannabis Company in Pendletonwill pay a fine of $2,970 or serve an 18-day recreational marijuana retailer license suspension for two violations.

The first violation is for the licensee failing to ensure that all marijuana items on the retail premises were kept in a safe or vault.

The second violation is for the licensee or the licensee’s employees, agents, servants or representatives failing to enter data into the Metrc Cannabis Tracking System (CTS) that fully and transparently accounted for all inventory tracking activities when Shawn Pace was listed as the CTS user, package adjustments were listed as “in house quality control,” and items reported to be “package adjustments” were found to still be on the premises.

Licensee is Pendleton Cannabis LLC.; Shawn Pace, Member; Roalynn Pace, Member.

Magic Castle in Medfordwill pay a fine of $6,105 or serve a 37-day recreational marijuana retailer license suspension for two violations.

The first violation is for the licensee failing to keep surveillance recordings for a minimum of 90 calendar days.

The second violation is for the licensee or the licensee’s employees, agents, servants or representatives failing to ensure that all marijuana items on the licensed retailer’s premises were kept in a safe or vault during all hours when Licensee was not operating.

Licensee is Magic Castle Inc.; Suren Vardanyan, President/Secretary/Stockholder; SR Ventures Inc., Member.

99 North; will pay a fine of $8,580 or serve a 52-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension for six violations.

The first violation is for the licensee’s employees, agents or representatives failing to enter data into the Metrc Cannabis Tracking System (CTS) that fully and transparently accounted for all inventory tracking activities.

The second violation is for the licensee maintaining cultivation batches at the premises that included more than 100 immature marijuana plants less than eight inches tall. Licensee created multiple cultivation batches that included more than 100 immature plants less than eight inches tall.

The third violation is for the licensee repeatedly failing to, within 45 days of harvesting a harvest lot, physically segregate individual harvest lots in a receptacle or multiple receptacles, and assign a UID tag to each receptacle that is linked to each plant that was harvested.

The fourth violation is for the licensee, its employees, agents, or representatives failing to ensure that cameras were placed in limited access areas on the premises in such a manner that they could capture clear and certain images of any individual and activity occurring in the limited access area.

The fifth violation is for the licensee failing to use UID tags issued by a Commission approved vendor, properly tag all inventory with a UID tag no later than when each plant reached a height of 24 inches or when the individual plants were identified as female, whichever was sooner, properly tag all other inventory with a UID tag pursuant to the requirements of CTS, and/or place tags in a position that can be clearly read by an individual standing next to the items, when inspectors located multiple untagged marijuana plants and items at the premises.

The sixth violation is for the licensee permitting a person, Julie Larsen, to use another person’s unique CTS log-on and password, when the Licensee Yu acknowledged that Julie Larsen used both her own unique log-on and password and Licensee Yu’s log-on and password to make entries related to the licensed premises.

Licensee is 99 North, LLC; Kimberly Yu, President/Secretary/Stockholder.

Hunter Neubauer; permittee will serve a 23-day suspension for one violation.

The Permittee made false statement(s) or representation(s) to the Commission in order to induce or prevent action or investigation by the Commission, when Permittee told Inspector Larry Brown that Licensee Oregrown has not had hemp on the premises since before they received their OLCC license and that “Mary’s Remedy Concentrated CBD Oil” label listing “hemp flower oil” as an ingredient was a mistake, probably from when they did process hemp items.

Oregrown; will serve a 76-day license suspension OR pay a fine of $4,950 and serve a 46-day recreational marijuana processor license suspension for three violations.

The first violation is for the licensee, a marijuana processor, and/or its employees, servants, agents, or representatives, permitted industrial hemp or a product derived from industrial hemp that contains cannabinoids to be present on the licensed premises.

The second violation is for the licensee’s employee, servant, agent or representative Aviv Hadar making a false statement or representation to the Commission in order to induce or prevent action or investigation by the Commission, when he told OLCC Recreational Marijuana Packaging and Labeling Specialist Jamie Dickinson that the “Mary’s Remedy Concentrated CBD Oil” label listing “hemp flower oil” as an ingredient was a typo/mistake from the Mary’s design team.

The third violation is for the Licensee’s employee, agent, or representative Managing Partner Hunter Neubauer, making false statement(s) or representation(s) to the Commission in order to induce or prevent action or investigation by the Commission, when Permittee told Inspector Larry Brown that Licensee Oregrown has not had hemp on the premises since before they received their OLCC license and that “Mary’s Remedy Concentrated CBD Oil” label listing “hemp flower oil” as an ingredient was a mistake, probably from when they did process hemp items.

Licensee is Pacific Enterprise Holdings, LLC; Oregrown Inc., Managing Member. Hunter Neubauer, President/Director/Stockholder; Kevin Hogan, Secretary, Director/Stockholder; Tsiona Bitton, Director/Stockholder; Justin Crawn, Director/Stockholder;

Rogue Coast Growers; will pay a fine of $9,750 or serve a 58-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension for five violations.

The first violation is for the licensee, or the licensee’s employees, agents, servants or representatives failing to keep surveillance recordings for a minimum of 90 calendar days.

The second violation is for the licensee, or the licensee’s employees, agents, servants, or representatives intentionally making physical changes to the licensed premises or the usage of the licensed premises that materially or substantially altered the licensed premises or the usage of the licensed premises from the plans originally approved by the Commission, without the Commission’s prior written approval when, during a premise inspection, it was discovered that an unapproved greenhouse structure and a hoop house structure were being used to grow marijuana plants.

The third violation is for the is for the licensee, or the licensee’s employees, agents, servants, or representatives failing to ensure that commercial grade, non-residential door locks were installed on every external door and gate of the licensed premises where marijuana items were present, specifically, on the door of the greenhouse and hoop house gate.

The fourth violation is for the licensee, its employees, agents, servants, or representatives failing to have a security alarm system able to detect unauthorized activity within any limited access area where mature marijuana plants, usable marijuana, cannabinoid concentrates, extracts, or products are in place.

The fifth violation is for the licensee, its employees, agents, or representatives failing to ensure that cameras were placed in a manner that captures clear and certain images of any individual and activity occurring within 15 feet both inside and outside of all points of ingress and egress to and from the licensed premises in and around the greenhouse structure and the hoop house structure.

Licensee is Rogue Coast Growers, LLC.; John Weinert, Managing Member; Gold Beach Ventures, LLC, Member.

 

 

Vermont: Adult Use Marijuana Law Enacted

VERMONT: Legislation permitting adults to legally possess and grow set quantities of cannabis for their own personal use took effect on Sunday, July 1.

Vermont joins Alaska, California, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington in legalizing the adult possession and use of marijuana. It is the first state to enact legalization via an act of the legislature rather than by the passage of a voter initiative.

The new law, which Republican Gov. Phil Scott signed in January, legalizes the possession of up to one ounce of cannabis, as well as the private cultivation of six marijuana plants (two mature and up to four immature). Those who cultivate marijuana for their own personal use may possess at home the total quantity of their harvest. The measure also imposes new civil penalties with regard to the consumption of cannabis while driving, and imposes additional penalties for those who operate a motor vehicle impaired with a minor in the vehicle.

summary of the law is available online.


For more information, contact Justin Strekal, NORML Political Director, at (202) 483-5500.

California Licensing Authorities Propose Readoption Of Emergency Cannabis Regulations

CALIFORNIA: The Bureau of Cannabis Control, California Department of Public Health and California Department of Food and Agriculture have proposed to readopt their emergency regulations that are currently in effect, extending the time those regulations are in effect for another 180-day period.

The three licensing authorities are proposing some changes to the regulatory provisions to provide greater clarity to licensees and to address issues that have arisen since the emergency regulations went into effect. Highlighted among the proposed changes is that applicants may now complete one license application and obtain one license to conduct medicinal and adult-use cannabis activity.

Additionally, licensees may continue to engage in commercial cannabis activities with other licensees regardless of designation as this provision is no longer limited by time. “These proposed changes to our emergency regulations are based on feedback from our stakeholders, and information gathered over the first four months of implementation,” said Bureau of Cannabis Control Chief Lori Ajax.

BCC logoBureau of Cannabis Control: 

https://bcc.ca.gov/law_regs/emergency_regs_proptext.pdf

https://bcc.ca.gov/law_regs/emergency_regs_factsheet.pdf

California Department of Food and Agriculture: 

 https://bcc.ca.gov/law_regs/emergency_regs_proptext_cdfa.pdf

https://cannabis.ca.gov/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2018/05/CA-Department-of-Food-and-Agriculture

Readoption-of-Emergency-Regulations-Fact-Sheet.pdf

California Department of Public Health: 

 https://bcc.ca.gov/law_regs/emergency_regs_proptext_cdph.pdf

https://cannabis.ca.gov/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2018/05/CA-Department-of-Public-Health

Readoption-of-Emergency-Regulations-Fact-Sheet.pdf

 

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vHL3bPnjgo&w=560&h=315]

Connecticut House Appropriations Committee Approves Marijuana Legalization Bill

CONNECTICUT: The Joint Committee on Appropriations approved a bill that would legalize and regulate marijuana for adults in Connecticut on Thursday, potentially setting it up for floor consideration before the end of this year’s legislative session.

regulate marijuanaHB 5394, which was introduced by the committee, would task the commissioners of Mental Health and Addiction Services and Consumer Protection and Revenue Services with developing regulations for possession and retail sales of marijuana for adults 21 and older. More details will be added to the bill as it moves forward over the coming weeks.

“This committee vote reiterates what most Connecticut residents already know: it is time to make marijuana legal for adults,” said Becky Dansky, legislative counsel for the Marijuana Policy Project. “The discussions that have taken place in the legislature this year have provided more than enough information to effectively move forward with legalization. Connecticut should stop punishing adults for using a substance that is safer than alcohol, and it has an opportunity to regulate marijuana before it starts losing tax revenue to other states in the region that have already started this process.”

There are nine states that have made marijuana legal for adults, as well as the District of Columbia. Neighboring Massachusetts is in the process of implementing its regulated marijuana market, and in nearby New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy has made legalizing and regulating marijuana a priority this year.

poll conducted by Sacred Heart University in October 2017 showed that 71% of Connecticut residents support regulating and taxing marijuana for adults.

 

Vermont Governor Phil Scott Signs H. 511 Legalizing Marijuana For Adult Use

VERMONT:  On January 22nd, 2018 Governor Phil Scott signed H. 511, An act relating to eliminating penalties for possession of limited amounts of marijuana by adults 21 years of age or older, into law.

Read his full message to the General Assembly below:

“Today, with mixed emotions, I have signed H. 511.

“As I said when I vetoed S. 22 in May, I personally believe that what adults do behind closed doors and on private property is their choice, so long as it does not negatively impact the health and safety of others, especially children.  In this context, it is very important to understand what H. 511 does and does not do.

“While this legislation decriminalizes, for adults 21 and older, personal possession of no more than 1 ounce, and cultivation of two mature plants on their private property, marijuana remains a controlled substance in Vermont and its sale is prohibited.  Also, consumption of marijuana in public places is prohibited.  Consumption of marijuana by operators and passengers in a motor vehicle is prohibited.  Schools, employers, municipalities and landlords are also empowered to adopt policies and ordinances further restricting the cultivation and use.

“In addition, when we negotiated a compromise prior to the veto session in June, I insisted the legislation also include:

  • Stronger criminal and civil penalties for selling to or enabling the consumption of marijuana by someone under 21;
  • Criminal penalties for using marijuana in a motor vehicle with a child present;
  • Criminal penalties for using or growing marijuana at facilities serving children.
  • Clear legal liability of the consequences of making marijuana available to minors.
  • Strict penalties for possession of marijuana by those convicted of felony sale of marijuana, selling a regulated drug to minors, or on school grounds;
  • Stronger penalties and fines for open containers in a motor vehicle; and
  • Marijuana in excess of the permitted limit remains contraband and subject to seizure and forfeiture.

“H. 511 included these additional protections.

“My S.22 veto message also plainly expressed my reservations about a commercial system which depends on profit motive and market driven demand for its growth.  I look forward to the Marijuana Advisory Commission addressing the need to develop comprehensive education, prevention and highway safety strategies. To be very direct:  There must be comprehensive and convincing plans completed in these areas before I will begin to consider the wisdom of implementing a commercial “tax and regulate” system for an adult marijuana market. It is important for the General Assembly to know that – until we have a workable plan to address each of these concerns – I will veto any additional effort along these lines, which manages to reach my desk.

“More importantly, as I noted in my State of the State address, I ask the General Assembly to now turn its efforts to addressing more significant issues faced by Vermonters in their daily lives.”

Click here to view the letter sent to the General Assembly.

Colorado Has Backed Off Plans For Marijuana Clubs

By Kristen Wyatt, Associated Press

COLORADO: Colorado lawmakers have backed off plans to regulate marijuana clubs, saying the state would invite a federal crackdown by approving Amsterdam-style pot clubs.

The state House voted Thursday to amend a bill that would have set rules for how private pot clubs could work.

It was a dramatic reversal. Bring-your-own pot clubs had bipartisan support in the Legislature, and the measure had already cleared the GOP Senate.

But lawmakers bowed to Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper, who repeatedly warned lawmakers that he would veto a club measure if it allowed indoor pot-smoking. The governor also warned that clubs, and a separate proposal to allow pot delivery, might invite intervention from the U.S. Department of Justice.

“Given the uncertainty in Washington, this is not the time to be . trying to carve off new turf and expand markets and make dramatic statements about marijuana,” Hickenlooper told The Denver Post last month.

Sponsors of the club bill said that they had little choice but to back off, leaving Colorado with its current spotty club landscape.

Colorado already has about 30 private pot clubs, according to legislative analysts, but they operate under a patchwork of local regulations and are sometimes raided by law enforcement.

Clubs in Colorado frequently operate in a similar manner to pot clubs in states where pot isn’t legal, with small groups meeting up to smoke in a secret location members sometimes call “Dave’s House,” a reference to an old Cheech and Chong skit.

The House amendment passed Thursday effectively removes club regulations, and the remaining bits of the bill are relatively minor. The bill could face yet more changes before a final vote. Lawmakers who bemoaned the club bill’s demise cited U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who has hinted that states violating federal drug law won’t be tolerated.

“I’d like to see (a club bill) that goes much further, and that does a lot more, but in a year with Jeff Sessions, a small first step is better than no step at all,” Democratic Rep. Jonathan Singer said.

Not everyone agreed with the change, saying Colorado is wimping out by backing off.

“It only makes sense to allow people to have a place to where they can (smoke marijuana) where it’s controlled and confined,” said Republican Sen. Tim Neville, who sponsored a separate club bill that failed because it would have allowed clubs to sell the marijuana people would smoke, similar to a bar selling alcohol.

“We have legalized marijuana. Where do we want people to use it if not at home? On the street?”

The Colorado bill would have made it the first state to regulate clubs statewide

Alaska pot regulators decided earlier this month to delay action on a measure to allow on-site pot consumption at marijuana dispensaries, or “tasting rooms.”

Ballot measures approved by voters last year in California, Maine and the city of Denver would allow either on-site pot consumption or so-called “social use” clubs, but regulations for how those clubs would work haven’t been settled.

Senate Leaders: Vermont Pot Bill Unlikely To Pass

By Associated Press 

VERMONT: Top Senate lawmakers in Vermont say passing a marijuana legalization bill is becoming exceedingly unlikely.

The Vermont House is still debating their version of a legalization bill, which would simply legalize personal cannabis use, possession and cultivation. There are just over three weeks to go in the lawmaking session and Senate lawmakers expected the bill to get to them weeks ago.

Senate leaders also say the House bill would continue to allow for a black market, and they favor a law that would tax and regulate sales of the plant. A Senate measure in 2016 that proposed a legal marijuana market died in the House last year.

Vermont’s constitution disallows referendums, thwarting another avenue to legalize marijuana as other states have done.

 

Marijuana ‘Gifts’ Legal As Maine Works Out Licensing Rules

By The Associated Press 

MAINE:  A Biddeford business owner hoping to start selling pot next year is giving his products away for free for now.

The Portland Press Herald reports that Jack Sargent of the Biddeford-based Cannabis Shack is accepting donations for shipping and handling while waiting for the state to issue retail licenses.  It’s legal to accept free gifts of pot and some say the limbo before the opening of retail stores is pushing otherwise law-abiding citizens into an underground market.

Some states have cracked down on such practices. The voter-approved law legalizing marijuana took effect in January.  Adults can legally possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana and grow their own plants.  But no one can legally sell pot as Maine works through the extensive process of regulating the sale of marijuana.

OLCC Updates Cities/Counties Prohibiting Licensed Recreational Marijuana Facilities

OREGON: The following cities or counties have prohibited the establishment of Licensed Recreational Marijuana producers, processors, wholesalers, and/or retailers.

The cities or counties listed below have:

  • Provided the OLCC with a copy of their ordinance, per Chapter475B.
  • Signed and returned the official “Local Option Opt‐Out” form which can be found at www.marijuana.oregon.gov.
  • Have put or will be putting the opt-out measure to a vote at the next general election (ifapplicable).
Affected City/County Producer Prohibited (Y/N) Processor Prohibited (Y/N) Wholesale Prohibited (Y/N) Retail Prohibited (Y/N) To Be Put On 2018 General Election (Y/N)
Adrian Y Y Y Y N
Athena Y Y Y Y N
Aumsville Y Y Y Y N
Baker City Y Y Y Y N
Baker County Y Y Y Y N
Boardman Y Y Y Y N
Burns Y Y Y Y N
Canby Y Y Y Y N
Canyon City Y Y Y Y N
Canyonville Y Y Y Y N
Central Point Y Y Y Y N
Coburg Y Y Y Y N
Cove Y Y Y Y N
Creswell Y Y Y Y N
Crook County Y Y Y Y N
Culver Y Y Y Y Y
Dayville Y Y Y Y N
Douglas County Y Y Y Y N
Eagle Point Y Y Y Y N
Elgin Y Y Y Y N
Enterprise Y Y Y Y N
Fairview Y Y Y Y N

 

Affected City/County Producer Prohibited (Y/N) Processor Prohibited (Y/N) Wholesale Prohibited (Y/N) Retail Prohibited (Y/N) To Be Put On 2018 General Election (Y/N)
Gaston Y Y Y Y N
Grant County Y Y Y Y N
Grass Valley Y Y Y Y N
Haines Y Y Y Y Y
Halfway Y Y Y Y N
Halsey Y Y Y Y N
Harney County Y Y Y Y N
Harrisburg Y Y Y Y N
Heppner Y Y Y Y N
Hermiston Y Y Y Y N
Ione Y Y Y Y N
Irrigon Y Y Y Y N
Island City Y Y Y Y N
Jacksonville Y Y Y Y N
Jefferson County Y Y Y Y N
John Day Y Y Y Y N
Jordan Valley Y Y Y Y N
Joseph Y Y Y Y N
Junction City Y Y Y Y N
Klamath County Y Y Y Y N
Klamath Falls Y Y Y Y N
LaGrande Y Y Y Y N
Lake County Y Y Y Y N
Lake Oswego Y Y Y Y N
Lexington Y Y Y Y N
Long Creek Y Y Y Y N
Lostine Y Y Y Y N
Lyons Y Y Y Y N
Malheur County Y Y Y Y N
Marion County Y Y Y Y N
Maupin Y Y Y Y N
Merrill Y Y Y Y N
Mill City Y Y Y Y N
Millersburg Y Y Y Y N
Milton-Freewater Y Y Y Y N
Monument Y Y Y Y N
Moro Y Y Y Y N
Morrow County Y Y Y Y N
Mount Angel Y Y Y Y N

 

Affected City/County Producer Prohibited (Y/N) Processor Prohibited (Y/N) Wholesale Prohibited (Y/N) Retail Prohibited (Y/N) To Be Put On 2018 General Election (Y/N)
Mount Vernon Y Y Y Y N
North Powder Y Y Y Y N
Nyssa Y Y Y Y N
Ontario Y Y Y Y N
Prairie City Y Y Y Y N
Richland Y Y Y Y N
Rufus Y Y Y Y N
Sandy Y Y Y Y N
Scott Mills Y Y Y Y N
Shady Cove Y Y Y Y N
Shaniko Y Y Y Y N
Sherman County Y Y Y Y N
Sherwood Y Y Y Y N
Spray Y Y Y Y N
Sublimity Y Y Y Y N
Summerville Y Y Y Y N
Sutherlin Y Y Y Y N
Ukiah Y Y Y Y N
Umatilla Y Y Y Y N
Umatilla County Y Y Y Y N
Union Y Y Y Y N
Union County Y Y Y Y N
Vale Y Y Y Y N
Wallowa Y Y Y Y N
Wallowa County Y Y Y Y N
Wasco City Y Y Y Y N
West Linn Y Y Y Y N
Wilsonville Y Y Y Y N
Wheeler County Y Y Y Y N

 

Cities Counties Total
No Voter Referral 73 16 89
2018 Voter Referral 2 0 2
Total 75 16 91

Contact the individual city or county directly for a copy of their local ordinance or for the text of the measure (if applicable).

If you are aware of any discrepancies contact us at marijuana@oregon.gov.

The most recent addition is highlighted for your convenience.

Washington LCB Notice of Rule Making – Pre-proposal – #17-04: Producer Tier Structure

WASHINGTON: The Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board has entered into the initial stage of rulemaking (CR 101) to consider rule changes in Chapter 314-55 related to the producer tier structure and potentially allowing producers to hold an interest in more than one license. The CR 101 is the initial notification of potential rule making and no rule language is offered at this stage of the process. The CR 101 and an explanatory statement for this rule making accompany this notice.

The Liquor and Cannabis Board encourages you to give input on the subject of these potential changes.  Following the comment period, the agency will send out and publish the proposed rules, establish a comment period on the proposed rules, and hold a public hearing before the rules are adopted.

This notice can be found at lcb.wa.gov/laws/laws-and-rules under Proposed Rules.