Oregon Liquor Control Commission Licensing Director Message: Marijuana Licensing Streamlining Update

January 8, 2021

A Phased Approach

Early in 2020 because interest to enter Oregon’s expanding recreational marijuana market continued to grow, it became clear that we needed a new approach for processing marijuana license applications. In response, my staff and I conducted a program evaluation in March 2020, to identify opportunities for improvement throughout the licensing program. Aside from the need for our staffing resources to grow to match the industry’s requirements (which we will continue to address with our legislative partners) we developed a formal year-long improvement strategy outlined below in three phases.

Phase 1: Streamlined license renewal process (Complete)

This included reducing the complexity of renewal applications, making licensing system updates and updating internal processes regarding renewals. Improvements to our renewal system went live August 4, 2020.

Outcome: Marijuana license renewals process times have been reduced from an average of 347 days from submission in Q4 2019, to 156 days from submission in Q4 2020. Current licensees should realize these improvements at their next renewal period occurring after August 4, 2020.

 

Phase 2: Removal of Pre-licensing Inspections and streamlining workflows (Complete)

In April 2020, the Commission eliminated the requirement to conduct pre-licensing onsite inspections before issuing a license, and during last summer we made improvements to licensing workflows by reducing redundant routine reviews of work and providing more empowerment to staff. Our evaluation showed this was taking as much as 40-50% of the processing time for new applications; these improvements removed that constraint.

Outcome: Marijuana license application process times from assignment have been reduced from an average of 168 days in Q4 2019 to the average of 61 days in Q4 2020.

 

Phase 3: Entrusting the Industry (Complete)

The overall philosophy of this change was rethinking how we address marijuana licensing. Specifically, phase 3 changes reduced the level of scrutiny for applicants who have already been vetted and previously licensed. Further, the agency reassigned personnel and added contract workers to solely focus on licensing activity. The Commission also approved “streamlining licensing,” rule changes at our October 15, 2020 Commission meeting.

Outcome: License application processing times approved during the month of December 2020, averaged 54 days from the date of assignment. These tangible changes have reduced the back and forth between applicants and the Commission.

 

The Readiness Checklist: Who’s ready? Who’s not?

In addition, we’ve implemented a new process to provide us more insight into applicants within our applicant pool by utilizing a request for assignment form (aka “The Readiness Checklist”). This process helps identify a marijuana license applicant’s desire to be assigned and enables them to self-determine their readiness to complete the license process within the required 60 day period.

As of November 16, 2020, my staff has reached out to all 881 “pre-pause” applicants, to determine their desire and readiness to be assigned. Pre-pause applicants include applications submitted prior to the June 15, 2018, pause on processing licenses. As of January 5, 2021, we have:

  • 319 or approximately 36% of the 881 applications are ready to be assigned
  • 360 or approximately 40% of applicants have said they are not ready
  • These applicants have delayed assignment by an average of 5 months.
  • 139 applicants not respond at all.
  • 49 application withdrawals.
  • The remaining 14 are in process.

As of January 6, 2021, we have assigned all applicants who’ve requested to be assigned as of that date. Additionally, as we receive requests for assignments, now we are consistently able to assign applications within two to four weeks of receiving the request for assignment form.

In addition to this progress on new marijuana license applications, we have been able to reduce the time it takes to assign change requests (e.g. location, ownership, etc.) from four to six months in Q3 2019, to approximately two months in Q3 2020. Moving forward, while we further refine our processes, our standard is to be able to assign these requests within 60 days of receiving them.

Regarding the non-responsive applicants, we’ve reached out to each one and subsequently followed up with those applicants prior to December 12, 2020 in order to provide a final opportunity for them to respond before inactivating their application.

Industry members and applicants should ensure they are monitoring any communications from the Commission and double check that the contact information affiliated with the license application is up to date.

 

The New Year: What’s next?

Earlier this year, OLCC Executive Director Steve Marks committed to reducing the backlog of license applications by one third by February 1, 2021; at the time he made that pledge that meant reducing our application pool by a total of 350 applications. The progress we have demonstrated leads me to believe we will meet, or come close to, accomplishing that goal. Should we not be able to, this will be in large part due to the number of applicants who’ve indicated they’re not ready to be assigned. As mentioned above, we are assigning applications within two to four weeks of receiving a request for assignment form. The average time to process a license application once it’s assigned was 61 days in Q4 2020; that’s a significant reduction and close to the new standard we’ve set.

With the changes we’ve made this year and at the current pace that we receive license applications, this should not be difficult to maintain going forward. These accomplishments truly deliver what the industry asked us to address, both in timeliness and predictability. We hope this serves as an example of how we will continue to work with the industry and to strive to improve and make Oregon a leader in the cannabis industry and a model for cannabis regulation.

As always, please don’t hesitate to reach out with feedback and guidance that will help us collectively make constructive improvements to the OLCC Recreational Marijuana Program.

Jason Hanson

OLCC Director of Licensing

Jason.hanson@oregon.gov

 

 

WSLCB Actions: New Permanent Rule For Certificates Of Compliance For Cannabis Business Locations And Extension Of Emergency Rules On Prohibition Of Vitamin E Acetate

January 6, 2021 Board Action

On Jan. 6, during a regularly scheduled meeting, the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board took the following actions:

Adopted Emergency Rules (CR-103E) Regarding Vitamin E Acetate

Emergency Rules (WAC 314-55-1055) – Marijuana Product Disclosure Form (Effective January 6, 2021)

Emergency Rules (WAC 314-55-1065) – LCB Vitamin E Acetate Prohibition (formerly LCB Vitamin E Acetate Ban) (Effective January 6, 2021)

Emergency Rules (WAC 314-55-077) – Marijuana Processor License – Privileges, Requirements and Fees (Effective January 6, 2021)

Emergency Rules (WAC 314-55-079) – Marijuana Retailer License – Privileges, Requirements and Fees (Effective January 6, 2021)

 

Adopted Permanent Rule (CR-103P)  Certificate of Compliance – location of business upon application submission)

Implementation of SSB 6206 – Marijuana Business Premise Certificate of Compliance (Effective February 6, 2021)

OLCC Recalls Contaminated Marijuana Products Sold Into Recreational Market

Product still in stores “locked” in Cannabis Tracking System to prevent new sales

OREGON:The Oregon Liquor Control Commission is issuing an immediate health and safety recall after identifying pesticide contaminated marijuana products sold through OLCC recreational marijuana licensed retailers. The OLCC has notified retailers to place a hold on all affected products.

The marijuana flower and extract products initially failed pesticide testing (for the analyte Abamectin) with a subcontracted laboratory, but the primary lab – Ecotest – marked that it passed testing in March 2020. The OLCC in September 2020 issued an immediate license suspension to Ecotest due to a number of violations, including the loss of accreditation from the Oregon Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program (ORELAP) for failing to meet required testing procedures and standards (see OLCC press release). Later, the OLCC formally cancelled Ecotest’s license.

The contaminated marijuana originally entered the Oregon market from a medical grower transferring it into the OLCC regulated system. Oregon Medical Marijuana Program growers are allowed, with prior approval, to sell no more than 20 pounds of marijuana flower annually into the recreational system.

The contaminated product includes several strains of marijuana flower pre-rolls, and “Purple Slurry” extract. Due to the incorrect entry of results by Ecotest, when making the

Consumers can identify the affected products with the following information:

“Emerald Extracts Purple Slurry”

  • Manufactured by Emerald Treasure LLC (030-1008341A083)
  • Label Id = 2805
  • Made on 9/9/20
  • Tested by MW Labs (010-1008606C050) on 9/14/2020

Marijuana flower pre-rolls

  • Strains of “Qurkle,” “BP Oil Slick,” or “Green Crush”
  • Tested by Ecotest (010-1008170B3B6) on 3/12/2020
  • Sold from Bernie’s Universal Dispensaries in South Beach, OR

Consumers who have these recalled products should dispose of the products or return them to the retailer where they were purchased.

A table listing the retailers that sold the items and the approximate dates the products were sold is attached to the press release version of this communication, which can be found on the OLCC website.

The contamination issue was reported to OLCC on December 29, 2020 by a second processor whose extract product failed pesticide testing; their product was never sold to consumers. Using data from the Cannabis Tracking System, OLCC staff were able to verify the failed subcontracted test, trace the affected items in the system, and issue guidance to licensees to set aside the contaminated product.

Consumers who have these recalled products should dispose of the products or return them to the retailer where they were purchased.  Consumers can follow these instructions found on the OLCC Recreational Marijuana Program website to destroy marijuana on their own.

There have been no reports of illness. The possible health impact of consuming marijuana products with unapproved pesticide residues is unknown. Short and long-term health impacts may exist depending on the specific product, duration, frequency, level of exposure, and route of exposure. Consumers with concerns about their personal health should contact their physician with related questions. Consumers with questions or concerns about recalled product or pesticide residues in marijuana products are encouraged to contact the product retailer and/or the Oregon Poison Center at 800-222-1222.

NY Governor Cuomo Announces Proposal To Legalize And Create An Equitable Adult-Use Cannabis Program As Part Of The 2021 State Of The State

Proposal to Create the new Office of Cannabis Management to Regulate State Medical and Adult-use Cannabis and Cannabinoid Hemp Programs

Equitable Market Structure to Invest in Individuals and Communities Disproportionately Impacted by Prohibition

NEW YORK: Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced a proposal to legalize and create a comprehensive system to oversee and regulate cannabis in New York as part of the 2021 State of the State. Under the Governor’s proposal, a new Office of Cannabis Management would be created to oversee the new adult-use program, as well as the State’s existing medical and cannabinoid hemp programs. Additionally, an equitable structure for the adult-use market will be created by offering licensing opportunities and assistance to entrepreneurs in communities of color who have been disproportionately impacted by the war on drugs. Once fully implemented, legalization is expected to generate more than $300 million in tax revenue.

“Not only will legalizing and regulating the adult-use cannabis market provide the opportunity to generate much-needed revenue, but it also allows us to directly support the individuals and communities that have been most harmed by decades of cannabis prohibition.”

“Despite the many challenges New York has faced amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, it has also created a number of opportunities to correct longstanding wrongs and build New York back better than ever before,” Governor Cuomo said. “Not only will legalizing and regulating the adult-use cannabis market provide the opportunity to generate much-needed revenue, but it also allows us to directly support the individuals and communities that have been most harmed by decades of cannabis prohibition.”

The Governor’s proposal builds on years of work to understand and decriminalize cannabis for adult use. In 2018, the Department of Health, under Governor Cuomo’s direction, conducted a multi-agency study which concluded that the positive impacts of legalizing adult-use cannabis far outweighed the negatives. It also found that decades of cannabis prohibition have failed to achieve public health and safety goals and have led to unjust arrests and convictions particularly in communities of color.

In 2019, Governor Cuomo signed legislation to decriminalize the penalties for unlawful possession of marijuana. The legislation also put forth a process to expunge records for certain marijuana convictions. Later that year, the Governor spearheaded a multi-state summit to discuss paths towards legalization of adult-use cannabis that would ensure public health and safety and coordinate programs regionally to minimize the cross-border movement of cannabis products.

Building on that important work, the proposal reflects national standards and emerging best practices to promote responsible use, limiting the sale of cannabis products to adults 21 and over and establishing stringent quality and safety controls including strict regulation of the packaging, labeling, advertising, and testing of all cannabis products. Cannabis regulation also offers the opportunity to invest in research and direct resources to communities that have been most impacted by cannabis prohibition.

Illinois Adult Use Cannabis Monthly Sales Figures 2020

ILLINOIS: The Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation, Office of the Secretary, issued updated sales figures for the state’s adult use cannabis sales.

Here are the Illinois full year sales figures for 2020, broken out by monthly totals.

 

FDA Warns Companies Illegally Selling CBD Products

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued five warning letters to companies for selling products containing cannabidiol (CBD) in ways that violate the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act). All five warning letters address the illegal marketing of unapproved CBD products claiming to treat medical conditions. The warning letters include CBD products that are especially concerning from a public health perspective due to the route of administration, including nasal, ophthalmic and inhalation. In addition, they address violations relating to the addition of CBD to food, and the impermissible marketing of CBD products as dietary supplements. Two of the letters also address CBD products illegally marketed for pets, including a product for use in the eye.

“The FDA’s first priority is to protect the health and safety of Americans. Many questions remain regarding the science, safety, effectiveness and quality of products containing CBD,” said FDA Principal Deputy Commissioner Amy Abernethy, M.D., Ph.D. “We remain focused on exploring potential pathways for CBD products to be lawfully marketed while also educating the public about these outstanding questions of CBD’s safety. Meanwhile, we will continue to monitor and take action, as needed, against companies that unlawfully market their products — prioritizing those that pose the greatest risk of harm to the public.”

The warning letters were issued to:

The FDA has previously sent warning letters to other companies illegally selling unapproved CBD products that claimed to prevent, diagnose, mitigate, treat or cure various diseases, in violation of the FD&C Act. In some cases, there were further violations because CBD was added to food, and some of the products were impermissibly marketed as “dietary supplements.”

The products that are the subject of the letters issued today have not gone through the FDA drug approval process and therefore are considered unapproved new drugs. It is not known whether they are effective for the uses claimed in labeling, what an appropriate dose might be, how they could interact with FDA-approved drugs or other products or whether they have dangerous side effects or other safety concerns. In addition, the manufacturing process of these unapproved CBD-containing drug products has not been subject to FDA review as part of the human or animal drug approval processes, so it is not known what the manufacturing conditions of, or contaminant levels in these products may be.

Under the FD&C Act, any product intended to diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat or prevent a disease, and any product (other than a food) that is intended to affect the structure or function of the body of humans or animals, is a drug. New human and animal drugs must be approved by the FDA or conform to a “monograph” for a particular drug category, as established by FDA’s Over-the-Counter (OTC) Drug Review, before they can be legally marketed as drugs. CBD was not an ingredient considered under the OTC Drug Review.

The FDA has not approved any CBD products other than one prescription drug for the treatment of seizures associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) and Dravet syndrome (DS) in human patients. CBD has not been approved as a food additive and does not meet the statutory definition of a dietary supplement.

The FDA has requested responses from the companies within 15 working days stating how they will address these issues, or providing their reasoning and supporting information as to why they think the products are not in violation of the law. Failure to adequately address the violations promptly may result in legal action, including product seizure and/or injunction.

The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.

Health Canada Releases New Data On Cannabis Use In Canada

CANADA:  Health Canada published the results of its 2020 Canadian Cannabis Survey. Results of the survey provide a snapshot of Canadians’ knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards cannabis and its use. Data were collected from April 30 to June 22, 2020.

The survey results will help to evaluate the impact of the Cannabis Act and inform policy and program development, and public education and awareness activities. This important research complements data collected through Health Canada’s national drug surveillance surveys—the Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey and the Canadian Student Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey.

Key findings show that:

  • More than half of those who use cannabis, report using it three days a month or less. 54% reported using cannabis three days per month or less, while 18% reported daily cannabis use. Responses were unchanged from 2019.
  • More than half of those who use cannabis choose to obtain it through a legal source. 41% reported legal storefront as their usual source, an increase from 24% in 2019, whereas 13% reported obtaining cannabis from a legal online source.
  • The COVID-19 pandemic has had some impacts on cannabis use. People who used cannabis in the past 12 months were asked if their cannabis use had changed due the pandemic—56% reported using the same amount, while 22% reported using more and 22% reported using less.
  • Smoking remains the most common method of consuming cannabis, but it has declined while eating cannabis products has increased since 2019.
  • Almost 8 in 10 Canadians feel they have access to trustworthy information to make informed decisions about their cannabis use. An increase from 71% in 2019 to 77% in 2020. Information about the health risks associated with cannabis use is widely available and reaching Canadians.
  • Driving after cannabis use has decreased among those who reported past 12-month cannabis use, as compared to 2019 results. 22% of those who use cannabis drove within two hours of smoking or vapourizing cannabis in their lifetime and 13% reported driving within four hours of orally ingesting cannabis in their lifetime.
  • The federal government will continue to conduct research and share the results with Canadians, public health officials, provinces and territories, and other stakeholders.

OLCC Commission Bans Some Additives from Cannabis Vaping Products

Additives linked to potential harm to cannabis consumers

More transparent ingredient disclosure required going forward

OREGON:  At its regular monthly meeting on December 17, 2020, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission banned two ingredients immediately from further use in cannabis vaping products — squalene and squalane. In addition, the Commission approved rules designed to provide better protection for cannabis consumers by requiring recreational marijuana licensees provide more transparent disclosure of, screening for, and labeling of inhalable cannabinoid products that use non-cannabis additives. The Commission also ratified five stipulated settlements.

The action taken against squalene and squalane comes in the wake of an OLCC investigation (see December 11, 2020 press release) that uncovered the use of those ingredients in cannabinoid vaping products sold in Oregon. The OLCC found that squalene and squalane were not disclosed as ingredients and were included on product labels as “natural flavors.” Studies, including one commissioned by the OLCC, have shown that squalene and squalane can produce harmful chemicals when exposed to heat and inhaled, posing potential harm to consumer health.

If the OLCC discovers any remaining products in the marketplace that contain squalene or squalane, those products will be subject to an immediate recall, a provision included in the new rules. Squalene and squalane join Vitamin E acetate on OLCC’s list of banned adulterants; as a result of the Commission’s actions, propylene glycol (PG) and triglycerides, like MCT oil, will be added to the list effective April 1, 2021.

The Commission began examining the impact of non-cannabis additives in the wake of the e-cigarette use-associated lung injury (EVALI) health crisis in mid-2019. During 2020, the OLCC held a series of discussions with cannabis industry stakeholders, public health officials and OLCC cannabis licensees to contemplate an approach for identifying and screening out non-cannabis ingredients added to cannabis products that pose a potential danger to human health. A framework for applying those standards was used to create the rules.

The approved rules will help the Commission protect health and safety by compelling greater ingredient disclosure, and to address both the acute and chronic health effects of additive ingredients when heated and inhaled by specifying the standards for non-cannabis additives being used in inhalable cannabinoid products. Because of the disclosure requirements, licensees and consumers will have greater assurance that any additives used in cannabis vape products were manufactured with the intent that they would be inhaled.

The rules take effect December 22, 2020, and the OLCC on that date will immediately begin accepting label applications under new rules for inhalable cannabinoid products. The Cannabis Tracking System (CTS) will be updated by that time to include a category for designating inhalable cannabinoid products.

Any inhalable cannabinoid products made on or after April 1, 2021, will be subject to the new rules, including no use of PG or MCT and full disclosure of additive ingredients on the item’s label. By April 1, all inhalable cannabinoid products (regardless of manufacture date) must also be tracked in CTS with disclosure of the additive mix used in the cannabinoid product.

From April 1 to July 1, 2021, OLCC recreational marijuana licensees are allowed to “sell down” any inhalable cannabinoid products made before April 1, 2021. Beginning July 1, 2021, all inhalable cannabinoid products in the marketplace must comply with the new rules and standards, and anything that does not comply, regardless of manufacture date, must be destroyed.

The Commission also ratified the following violation fines and suspensions based on stipulated settlements (detailed information on specific cases can be found here on the OLCC website):

SHADOWBOX FARMS (#1467A) will serve an 32-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension OR pay a fine of $5,280 for one violation.

Licensee is: Rogue Valley Group, LLC; Tim Winner, Manager; Artemis Group, LLC, Member; Joseph Bundy, Member; Megan Bundy, Member; Bryan Bundy, Member.

FLOWERSMITH will serve a 14-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension OR pay a fine of $2,310 for two violations.

Licensees are: Flowersmith, LLC; Samuel Felton, Member; Gavin Henner, Member

BLACK MARKET DISTRIBUTION will serve a 69-day recreational marijuana wholesaler license suspension OR pay a fine of $11,385 for three violations.

Licensees are: Black Market Distribution, LLC; Aaron Mitchell, Member; Rosa Cazares, Manager.

COPPERHEAD ORGANIC FARMS will surrender its license at the earlier of the date of transfer of ownership of the business or February 19, 2021 for four violations.

Licensees are: CH Organics, LLC; Corey Tarr, Member; Debra Davis Estate, Member.

FTC Announces Crackdown On Deceptively Marketed CBD Products

Companies made unsupported claims that their oils, balms, gummies, coffee, and other goods could treat serious diseases such as cancer and diabetes

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: The Federal Trade Commission today announced the first law enforcement crackdown on deceptive claims in the growing market for cannabidiol (CBD) products. The FTC is taking action against six sellers of CBD-containing products for allegedly making a wide range of scientifically unsupported claims about their ability to treat serious health conditions, including cancer, heart disease, hypertension, Alzheimer’s disease, and others.

The FTC is requiring each of the companies, and individuals behind them, to stop making such unsupported health claims immediately, and several will pay monetary judgments to the agency. The orders settling the FTC’s complaints also bar the respondents from similar deceptive advertising in the future, and require that they have scientific evidence to support any health claims they make for CBD and other products.

“The six settlements announced today send a clear message to the burgeoning CBD industry: Don’t make spurious health claims that are unsupported by medical science,” said Andrew Smith, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Otherwise, don’t be surprised if you hear from the FTC.”

The crackdown, Operation CBDeceit, is part of the Commission’s ongoing effort to protect consumers from false, deceptive, and misleading health claims made in advertisements on websites and through social media companies such as Twitter.

Each case the FTC is announcing today is described below:

Bionatrol Health, LLC

According to the FTC’s complaint against Utah-based companies Bionatrol Health, LLC and Isle Revive, LLC, and two former managers and owners, since at least December 2019 the respondents sold a CBD oil to consumers on two websites. Among other things, the respondents allegedly claimed without substantiation that their CBD product is safe for all users, treats pain better than prescription medications like OxyContin, and prevents and treats age-related cognitive decline and chronic pain. The respondents also claimed, without scientific evidence, that CBD oil is “medically proven” to improve a variety of conditions, according to the FTC’s complaint. In addition, the FTC alleges the respondents deceived consumers who ordered one bottle of their CBD oil by changing the order to five bottles without consumers’ consent.

The proposed administrative order settling the FTC’s charges prohibits the respondents from making certain prevention, treatment, or safety claims about dietary supplements, foods, and drugs without human clinical testing to substantiate the claims. It also requires competent and reliable scientific evidence for other health-related product claims, and prohibits the respondents from misrepresenting the cost of any good or service and from charging consumers without their express, informed consent. Finally, it requires the corporate respondents and individual respondent Marcello Torre to pay $20,000 to the FTC and to notify consumers of the Commission’s order.

Epichouse LLC (First Class Herbalist CBD)

According to the FTC’s complaint against Utah corporation Epichouse, LLC, which operated under several names, including First Class Herbalist, and the company’s founder and owner, John Le, since at least September 2019 the respondents sold several CBD products on their website, including oils, a pain-relief cream, coffee, and gummies.

Among other alleged unsupported claims, Epichouse and Le promoted CBD as safe for all users, able to treat pain better than prescription medications such as OxyContin, and able to prevent a wide range of serious conditions, including cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. In their advertising, they also falsely claimed that CBD is scientifically proven to improve many serious health conditions—including chronic pain and hypertension—and provide neurological benefit—such as preventing age-related cognitive decline—according to the FTC’s complaint.

The proposed administrative order settling the FTC’s charges prohibits the respondents from making certain prevention, treatment, or safety claims about dietary supplements, foods, and drugs, unless they have the human clinical testing to substantiate the claims. It requires them to have competent and reliable scientific evidence when making any other health-related product claims. Finally, the order requires the respondents to pay $30,000 to the FTC and notify consumers of the Commission’s order.

CBD Meds, Inc.

According to the FTC’s complaint against CBD Meds, Inc.; G2 Hemp, Inc.; and Lawrence Moses, a/k/a Lawrence D. Moses, Jr., individually and as an officer of the corporate entities, the two companies advertised CBD oil on their website and on YouTube. In their ads, the FTC contends, the Winchester, California-based firms made a number of false or unsubstantiated claims, including that CBD effectively treats, prevents, or mitigates serious diseases and conditions like artery blockage, cancer, glaucoma, autism, and schizophrenia, among many others. The respondents also falsely represented that some of the efficacy claims were scientifically proven or that the U.S. government has confirmed the health benefits of CBD.

The proposed administrative order settling the FTC’s charges prohibits the respondents from making certain prevention, treatment, or safety claims about dietary supplements, foods, and drugs, unless they have the human clinical testing to substantiate the claims. More broadly, it requires them to have competent and reliable scientific evidence when making any other health-related product claims. Finally, the order requires the respondents to notify consumers of the Commission’s order.

HempmeCBD

According to the FTC’s complaint against EasyButter, LLC, also d/b/a HempmeCBD, and its owner and officer Michael Solomon, since at least January 2018, the respondents have sold CBD products on their website, including CBD-infused shea butter, gummies, lozenges, honey sticks, vape pens, and oils. The complaint alleges that HempmeCBD claimed its CBD products could treat or cure serious ailments like cancer-related symptoms, substance abuse, and AIDS. The complaint alleges HempmeCBD lacked the scientific substantiation for such health claims and falsely claimed to have studies showing CBD is effective at treating autism.

The proposed administrative order settling the FTC’s charges prohibits the respondents from making certain prevention, treatment, or safety claims about dietary supplements, foods, and drugs, unless they have the human clinical testing to substantiate the claims. It also requires them to have competent and reliable scientific evidence when making any other health-related product claims. Finally, it requires the respondents to pay the FTC $36,254 and to notify consumers of the Commission’s order.

Reef Industries, Inc.

According to the FTC’s complaint against California-based Reef Industries, Inc.; Cannatera, Inc.; AndHemp, Ltd., and the companies’ three principals, the respondents have sold a variety of CBD products directly to consumers on their website and Twitter accounts since at least January 2019 and misrepresented the health benefits of CBD. The FTC alleges that the respondents made unsubstantiated claims that CBD can prevent, cure, mitigate, or treat diseases and serious health conditions, including Alzheimer’s disease, arthritis, autoimmune disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. The complaint also alleges the respondents falsely claimed that studies or scientific research prove that CBD is effective at treating, curing, or mitigating these diseases and conditions.

The proposed administrative order settling the FTC’s charges prohibits the respondents from making certain prevention, treatment, or safety claims about dietary supplements, foods, and drugs, unless they have the human clinical testing to substantiate the claims. More broadly, it requires them to have competent and reliable scientific evidence when making any other health-related product claims. Finally, it requires them to pay the FTC $85,000 and notify consumers of the Commission’s order.

Steves Distributing, LLC

According to the FTC’s complaint against Steves Distributing, LLC, d/b/a Steve’s Goods; and the company’s CEO Steven Taylor Schultheis, since beginning operations in 2018, the respondents have sold a variety of products containing both CBD and cannabigerol (CBG), which, like CBD, is a non-psychoactive compound derived from hemp. The company advertises its CBD and CBG products, including tinctures, gummies, capsules, topical balms, suppositories, bath balms, and coffee, on its website and through social media companies like Twitter.

The FTC alleges that the respondents claimed, without adequate substantiation, that their CBD and CBG products are effective alternatives to prescription medications and treat a wide range of diseases and serious health conditions, including Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, and diabetes. The complaint also alleges the respondents falsely claimed that their CBD and CBG products have antibacterial properties, prevent or reduce the risk of heart attacks, strokes, and other diseases, and that certain of these claims were supported by scientific evidence.

The proposed administrative order settling the FTC’s charges prohibits the respondents from making certain prevention, treatment, or safety claims about dietary supplements, foods, and drugs, unless they have the human clinical testing to substantiate the claims. More broadly, it requires them to have competent and reliable scientific evidence when making any other health-related product claims. Finally, it requires the respondents to pay the FTC $75,000 and notify consumers of the Commission’s order.

The Commission votes approving each of the six administrative complaints and proposed consent orders were 5-0, with Commissioner Rohit Chopra and Commissioner Christine S. Wilson issuing separate, concurring statements. A complete list of respondents can be found in the complaint for each respective case.

The FTC will publish a description of the consent agreement package in the Federal Register soon. The agreement will be subject to public comment for 30 days after publication in the Federal Register after which the Commission will decide whether to make the proposed consent order final. Instructions for filing comments will appear in the published notice. Once processed, comments will be posted on Regulations.gov.

NOTE: The Commission issues an administrative complaint when it has “reason to believe” that the law has been or is being violated, and it appears to the Commission that a proceeding is in the public interest. When the Commission issues a consent order on a final basis, it carries the force of law with respect to future actions. Each violation of such an order may result in a civil penalty of up to $43,280.

Ohio Board Of Pharmacy Publishes Updated Patient & Caregiver Numbers For November 2020

Update from the Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program

OHIO:   The State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy today published updated patient & caregiver numbers for November 2020. These numbers include:

  • 204,114 Recommendations
  • 154,376 Registered patients
    • 10,598 Patients with Veteran Status
    • 11,205 Patients with Indigent Status
    • 832 Patients with a Terminal Diagnosis
  • 131,398 Unique patients who purchased medical marijuana (as reported to OARRS by licensed dispensaries)
  • 17,463 Registered Caregivers

For the full list of program numbers, please visit the Program Update page.