Some Oregon Marijuana CO2 Extracts Contain High Levels of Possible Carcinogen

The lack of lab standards has led many advocates to work on new legislation and to ensure that a regulated, legalized system would mandate proper standards, something that would carry over to the medical regime.

OREGON:  The Oregon cannabis community was rocked when The Oregonian’s Noelle Crombie released her in-depth report on the lack of standards regarding the testing of marijuana products in Oregon. Crombie, who regularly reports on all things cannabis was noticeably absent from the scene for a bit, causing many to wonder what she was up to. When “A tainted high” hit The Oregonian/Oregonlive, with the tagline “LAX STATE RULES, INCONSISTENT LAB PRACTICES AND INACCURATE TEST RESULTS PUT PESTICIDE-LACED POT ON DISPENSARY SHELVES”, we learned that the talented reporter was investigating the very essence of the medical marijuana industry–the safety of cannabis products consumed by sick and disabled patients battling debilitating medical conditions.

 The results of her Crombie’s extensive report didn’t completely shock industry insiders in the know, but it certainly provided cause for concern among patients, particularly those with compromised immune systems. Fortunately, marijuana flowers, still the most popular way to utilize cannabis, didn’t contain the same high levels of pesticides and contaminants. Concentrates, such as hash oils, ever-growing in popularity, were the much bigger problem. The safety of cannabis flowers compared to concentrates and other products is one of the reasons the state is moving forward with the early sale of flowers to all adults on October 1st, but not allowing the sale of concentrates and other products.
As Crombie uncovered, some labs didn’t catch pesticides that others did and some marijuana items contained potentially harmful contaminants that weren’t pesticides. I must admit, even as someone with extensive knowledge of the cannabis industry, that I never expected to learn that products would contain “chemicals used to enhance the appearance of ornamental plants.”
Read full article @ Marijuana Politics

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