Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program Mandatory Product Recall October 1, 2020

Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program
Mandatory Product Recall – 10/1/2020
UPDATE
Yesterday, the Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program (MMCP) issued a mandatory product recall on edible products sold by Mother Grows Best, LLC dba Verano Brands. This recall was initiated by the MMCP because the product did not pass the full battery of required testing and was sold at specific dispensaries (see complete recall notice for product and dispensary information).
The MMCP identified the brand product, Encore Edibles (Dark Chocolate), as exceeding the regulatory thresholds for cadmium. Cadmium is a heavy metal found in soil and water that can be absorbed by and accumulated in plants (including cocoa beans) that are used to make food products. For non-smokers, food is the main source of cadmium intake for the general population. Increased daily exposure to cadmium can pose a health risk to patients.
Ohio Admin. Code 3796:4-2-04(H) states a heavy metal contamination analysis passes for cadmium if “the detected amount of cadmium, if any, is less than 0.09 micrograms per kilogram.” When establishing the thresholds, the MMCP utilized the average body weight assumption for a 10-year-old child. Utilizing this assumption creates a higher standard for MMCP products, with the goal of reducing the maximum daily exposure to heavy metals for patients.
For questions regarding cadmium, please review the following resources:
The MMCP continues to investigate this matter and will provide a comprehensive executive summary once complete. As a reminder, no reports of adverse reactions for this product have been reported to the MMCP at this time.
Anyone who thinks that they may be experiencing serious or life-threatening issues should seek immediate medical attention. Patients are reminded that any adverse reactions should be reported to the MMCP toll-free helpline (1-833-464-6627).

OHIO:  The Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program (MMCP) is issuing a mandatory product recall on edible products sold by Mother Grows Best. This recall is being initiated by the MMCP because the product did not pass the full battery of required testing and was sold at specific dispensaries (see Product ID information below). Additional details on the specifics of the recall will be provided in the coming days. The MMCP has initiated an investigation into the noncompliance and identified product samples to be tested. These results will be communicated publicly.

AFFECTED PRODUCT:

Product Name: Encore Edibles (Dark Chocolate)

Purchase Dates: 8/17/2020 – 10/1/2020

Processor Name: Mother Grows Best

Product ID:
Sold at Zen Leaf (Canton)
M00000078821: Edb Oral Admin – 10 – 0.4 – 10 – Dark Chocolate Indica
Batch Number: 1A40701000020D1000001083

Sold at Greenleaf Apothecaries (Akron)
M00000078821: Edb Oral Admin – 10 – 0.4 – 10 – Dark Chocolate Indica
Batch Number: 1A40701000020D1000001105

Sold at Greenleaf Apothecaries (Canton)
M00000078821: Edb Oral Admin – 10 – 0.4 – 10 – Dark Chocolate Indica
Batch Number: 1A40701000020D1000001111

Sold at Ohio Cannabis Company (Coshocton)
M00000078821: Edb Oral Admin – 10 – 0.4 – 10 – Dark Chocolate Indica
Batch Number: 1A40701000020D1000001124

Sold at Greenleaf Apothecaries (Cleveland)
M00000078821: Edb Oral Admin – 10 – 0.4 – 10 – Dark Chocolate Indica
Batch Number: 1A40701000020D1000001137

Sold at Greenleaf Apothecaries (Columbus)
M00000078821: Edb Oral Admin – 10 – 0.4 – 10 – Dark Chocolate Indica
Batch Number: 1A40701000020D1000001191

Sold at Pure Ohio Wellness (Dayton)
M00000078821: Edb Oral Admin – 10 – 0.4 – 10 – Dark Chocolate Indica
Batch Number: 1A40701000020D1000001219

Sold at Have a Heart Cincy (Cincinnati)
M00000078821: Edb Oral Admin – 10 – 0.4 – 10 – Dark Chocolate Indica
Batch Number: 1A40701000020D1000001310

No reports of adverse reactions for this product have been reported to the MMCP at this time.

Patients who have purchased the recalled product should stop using it.

All unused product should be returned to the dispensary where purchased. Returned products will not count toward a patient’s 45-day possession limit. For more information on returns, please contact the dispensary where the product was purchased.

Anyone who thinks that they may be experiencing serious or life-threatening issues should seek immediate medical attention. Patients are reminded that any adverse reactions should be reported to the MMCP toll-free helpline (1-833-464-6627).

USDA Approves Hemp Production Plans For Maine, Missouri, The Cow Creek Band Of Umpqua Tribe Of Indians

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has announced the approval of hemp production plans under the U.S. Domestic Hemp Production Program for Maine, Missouri and the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians, bringing the total number of approved plans to 58.

USDA continues to receive and review hemp production plans from states and Indian tribes. To review approved plans or check the status of a plan, visit the Status of State and Tribal Hemp Production Plans webpage.

State and tribal plans previously approved include:

States Tribes
Delaware Blackfeet Nation
Florida Cayuga Nation
Georgia Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes
Iowa Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe
Kansas Chippewa Cree Tribe
Louisiana Colorado River Indian Tribes
Maryland Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs
Massachusetts Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe
Minnesota Fort Belknap Indian Community
Montana Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska
Nebraska Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians
New Jersey La Jolla Band of Luiseno Indian Tribes
Ohio Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians
Pennsylvania Lower Sioux Indian Community
South Carolina Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida
Tennessee Oglala Sioux Tribe
Texas Otoe-Missouria Tribe
Washington Pala Band of Mission Indians
West Virginia Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma
Wyoming Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation
Puerto Rico Pueblo of Picuris Tribe
U.S. Virgin Islands Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians
Rosebud Sioux Tribe
Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa
Santa Rosa Cahuilla Indian Tribe
Santee Sioux Nation
Seneca Nation of Indians
Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribe
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe
Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians
Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska
Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo
Yurok Tribe

The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (2018 Farm Bill) directed USDA to develop a regulatory oversight program for hemp and include provisions for USDA to approve hemp production plans submitted by states and Indian tribes. Accordingly, on Oct. 31, 2019, USDA issued an interim final rule establishing the U.S. Domestic Hemp Production Program and the provisions for USDA to approve submitted plans. State and tribal plans provide details on practices and procedures that enable hemp producers in their jurisdictions to operate according to their individual plans and in compliance with federal laws.

For additional information about the program, visit the U.S. Domestic Hemp Production Program webpage.

Oregon: OLCC Commission Approves Marijuana Licensee Stipulated Settlements

OREGON: At its regular monthly meeting on August 20, 2020, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission approved six marijuana violation stipulated settlement agreements. The Commission also ratified the following violation fines and suspensions based on stipulated settlements (detailed information on specific cases can be found here on the OLCC website):

  • KALEAFA GRESHAM in Gresham will pay a fine of $7,000 for one violation, consolidating multiple packaging and labeling violations, against its recreational marijuana retailer license.

Licensee is: 1450 SE Orient, LLC; Chris Ostlund, Member; WWMP, LLC, Member; 3 Kids, Inc., Member; John Widmer, President/Stockholder; Julie Widmer, Secretary/Stockholder; Visionary Enterprises, Inc., Member; Rod Maguire, President/Stockholder; Melissa Maguire, Secretary/Stockholder.

KALEAFA will pay a fine of $28,000 for one violation, consolidating multiple packaging and labeling violations, against its recreational marijuana wholesaler license.

Licensees are: WWMP, LLC; 3 Kids, Inc., Member; John Widmer, President/Stockholder; Julie Widmer, Secretary/Stockholder; Visionary Enterprises, Inc., Member; Rod Maguire, President/Stockholder; Melissa Maguire, Secretary/Stockholder.

  • CANNA FLOW FARMS will pay a fine of $6,435 OR serve a 39-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension for two violations.

Licensees are: CannaFlo Farms, LLC; Jeffrey Schlageter, Member.

  • IVY CANNABIS will pay a fine of $4,125 OR serve a 25-day recreational marijuana wholesaler license suspension for three violations.

Licensees are: Attikus Enterprises, Inc.; Matthew Schwimmer, President/Stockholder; David Schwimmer, Vice President/Secretary/Stockholder.

  • MODERN FOREST in Lebanon will pay a fine of $14,025 OR serve an 85-day recreational marijuana retailer license suspension for two violations.

Licensee is: Modern Forest, LLC; Charles Troxell, Member; Laura Troxell, Member; Sven Roberts, Member; Amber Roberts, Member.

  • BUTTE CREEK FARMS will pay a fine of $14,850 OR serve a 90-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension for four violations.

Licensees are: Butte Creek Ranch Farm 1100, LLC; Thor Thompson, Member; Deborah Gadberry, Member; Tyler Lennick, Member.

Statement From The U.S. Hemp Growers Association On USDA Decision Not To Make Hemp Eligible for CFAP

U.S. Hemp Growers and its Board and members are very disappointed to learn that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has not agreed to make Hemp growers eligible for the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP.) We believe our farmers did present evidence of losses to our growers that were 5% or more in the first quarter of 2020.

Many of our members are confused as to how hemp is declared ineligible when such products as aloe leaves have been granted standing when “no price decrease was identified”, but they were affected by market chain disruption. Cut flowers were also granted standing. Hemp has been affected by market chain disruption, and measurable price decline, but mysteriously hemp has not received equal treatment from the USDA. Hemp is such a newly legal crop that it does not have the advantage of data to be gathered by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) or the Farm Service Agency (FSA) or the Risk Management Agency (RMA) – all at USDA. We do not know of any regional data collection as cited by the Department.

Currently, the data available to understand the market is gathered privately by several reputable data companies. In this case two of these companies released data publicly which USHGA believes showed a 5% pricing decrease and more in hemp and hemp products in the first quarter of 2020. We are grateful to these organizations for opening their data from behind their paid firewalls that serve private users.

Links to some of that data are here:

1. Hemp Benchmarks’ April 2020 Hemp Spot Price Index Report shows a drop in CBD Biomass price of approximately 12%-13% from January to April across the nation.

2. New Frontier Data reports that from February 2020 to March 2020 Colorado saw a 26% decline in price per percent of CBD per pound of hemp with Kentucky, Oregon and the Northeast showing similar declines. While a number of hemp growers will suffer severe damage, many others are continuing to grow hemp and offer it for processing into many products – from CBD to food products such as hemp seed and hemp hearts to hemp flour, and textiles, building materials, plastics and paper.

However, these growers are very concerned that USDA may not support the newly legal hemp crop as evidenced by the unequal treatment during the Coronavirus outbreak. There are family farmers who have been damaged by the downturn in the first quarter and who deserve fair treatment by USDA for CFAP coverage. All hemp farmers are now wondering what kind of treatment they will receive should there be future problems.

USHGA will continue to work with private data companies and with USDA to encourage the collection of accurate and comprehensive data about hemp and it products. And we will expect to be treated fairly as this information grows.

Colorado Ag Department Provides State Hemp Plan Status Update

COLORADO:  The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has requested Colorado clarify and revise certain elements of its State Hemp Management Plan, submitted on June 18, 2020. The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) is currently reviewing USDA’s comments and questions and considering revisions as it continues to prioritize representing the needs of the state’s industrial hemp registrants and stakeholders.

“As we have done from day one, CDA is working through the state plan submission and approval process in a careful and comprehensive manner to best serve the needs of Colorado,” said Colorado Commissioner of Agriculture Kate Greenberg. “Given the many changes at the federal level, we are working hard to create a stable and sound regulatory environment so that Colorado’s hemp industry can continue to lead the nation.”
Feedback received from numerous stakeholders statewide and over several months contributed to the plan, including input from farmers, processors and product manufacturers, state and local government agencies, healthcare professionals, financial services providers, law enforcement, and academic institutions, as well as consultation with Southern Ute and Ute Mountain Ute tribes, as part of CDA’s Colorado Hemp Advancement and Management Plan.

FDA Approves New Indication For Drug Containing An Active Ingredient Derived From Cannabis To Treat Seizures In Rare Genetic Disease

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: Last month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Epidiolex (cannabidiol) [CBD] oral solution for the treatment of seizures associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in patients one year of age and older. Epidiolex was previously approved for the treatment of seizures associated with two rare and severe forms of epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) and Dravet syndrome (DS). This is the only FDA-approved drug that contains a purified drug substance derived from cannabis. It is also the second FDA approval of a drug for the treatment of seizures associated with TSC.

CBD is a chemical component of the Cannabis sativa plant. However, CBD does not cause intoxication or euphoria (the “high”) that comes from tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). It is THC (and not CBD) that is the primary psychoactive component of cannabis.

“The FDA continues to believe the drug approval process represents the best way to make new medicines, including any drugs derived from cannabis, available to patients in need of appropriate medical therapy such as the treatment of seizures associated with these rare conditions. This paradigm ensures new therapies are safe, effective, and manufactured to a high quality that provides uniform and reliable dosing for patients,” said Douglas Throckmorton, M.D., deputy center director for regulatory programs in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “The agency is committed to supporting rigorous scientific research on the potential medical uses of cannabis-derived products and working with product developers who are interested in bringing patients safe and effective, high quality products.”

TSC is a rare genetic disease that causes non-cancerous (benign) tumors to grow in the brain and other parts of the body like the eyes, heart, kidneys, lungs, and skin. TSC usually affects the central nervous system and can result in a combination of symptoms including seizures, developmental delay, and behavioral problems, although the signs and symptoms of the condition, as well as the severity of symptoms, vary widely. TSC affects about 1 in 6,000 people.

Epidiolex’s effectiveness for the treatment of seizures associated with TSC was established in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial where 148 patients out of a total of 224 in the study received Epidiolex. The study measured the change from baseline in seizure frequency. In the study, patients treated with Epidiolex had a significantly greater reduction in the frequency of seizures during the treatment period than patients who received placebo (inactive treatment). This effect was seen within eight weeks and remained consistent throughout the 16-week treatment period.

The most common side effects that occurred in Epidiolex-treated patients with TSC in the clinical trial were: diarrhea, elevated liver enzymes, decreased appetite, sleepiness, fever, and vomiting. Additional side effects for patients with LGS, DS, or TSC include: liver injury, decreased weight, anemia, and increased creatinine.

Epidiolex must be dispensed with a patient Medication Guide that describes important information about the drug’s uses and risks. As is true for all drugs that currently treat epilepsy, including Epidiolex, the most serious risks may include an increase in suicidal thoughts and behavior, or thoughts of self-harm. Patients, their caregivers, and their families should be advised to monitor for any unusual changes in mood or behavior, such as worsening depression, suicidal thoughts or behavior. Patients, caregivers, and families should report behaviors of concern immediately to healthcare providers. Epidiolex also caused liver injury in some patients. Most cases were generally mild, but a risk of rare, but more severe liver injury exists. More severe liver injury can cause nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fatigue, anorexia, jaundice, and/or dark urine.

The FDA granted Priority Review designation for this application. The approval of Epidiolex was granted to Greenwich Biosciences Inc., of Carlsbad, California.

Office of Marijuana Policy Unveils New Details On Planned Launch Of Adult Use Marijuana In Maine

Retail sales to the public permitted to begin on or after October 9, 2020.

MAINE: The Office of Marijuana Policy, a part of the Maine Department of Administrative and Financial Services, unveiled plans for the issuance of Maine’s first active licenses for adult use marijuana establishments. The Office intends to issue the first active licenses to recreational cannabis businesses on Tuesday, September 8, 2020. Retail sales of adult use marijuana to consumers 21 years of age or older will be permitted starting on Friday, October 9, 2020.

The issuance of active licenses will continue the Office of Marijuana Policy’s structured rollout of Maine’s nascent adult use industry, which had been indefinitely postponed in April in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The public’s health and safety are at the forefront of every decision we make at the Office of Marijuana Policy,” said OMP Director Erik Gundersen. “While we were poised to launch this new industry earlier this year, we were unwilling to sacrifice the high standards we have set for this program by launching during an emerging public health pandemic and in the absence of a testing facility. With the support of the public health community, municipalities across the state, and the industry we regulate, we have used the last few months to ensure this new industry is introduced to Maine consumers in a manner that is as responsible as possible.”

Active licensure is the culmination of a three-step application process which also includes conditional licensure and local authorization, respectively. An active license is required for adult use establishments to come into possession, process and sell adult use marijuana, including initiating plant transfers from Maine’s existing medical marijuana program.

It is expected adult use licensees will utilize the time between active licensure and Maine’s retail sales launch date to harvest and process marijuana, ensure those products satisfy the mandatory testing requirements, and move product through the supply chain to stock retail store shelves. Additionally, businesses which will conduct retail sales will prepare to implement and support social distancing and other public health guidance at a time when public interest may attract a significant consumer presence to their retail locations.

“Today’s announcement is a major milestone in honoring the will of Maine voters and a significant step toward launching a new industry in the state,” added Gundersen. “Many of the business owners we have spoken with during the application process are ready and eager to commence operations.”

The application process required by the adult use law requires state regulators to review application materials for form and substance, with an eye toward details such as ensuring that all applicants have completed their required state and federal criminal history record checks; that the establishment’s operation, facility, and security plans satisfy the requirements of both the Marijuana Legalization Act and the adult use program rule; and that the designated host municipality has provided the applicant with authorization to conduct business in their community.

OMP expects to issue licenses in each of the four categories of adult use establishments: cultivation, products manufacturing, retail sale, and testing. Information on the specific number of licenses issued and the identities of active licensees will be made available on Tuesday, September 8, 2020.

The Mills Administration created OMP within DAFS in February 2019. The Office is responsible for the oversight of all aspects of legalized marijuana, including Maine’s existing Medical Use of Marijuana Program.

Four Things To Know Before Growing Marijuana For Business

Every business is potentially profitable, if know how to operate it. The most important quality you need to have as a businessman is the love for the work you do. It’s not a myth or quote by some old man. All experienced businessmen believe that you are unlikely to fail if you love your business. The love for CBD is constantly increasing, and so its usage. Most of those people will buy it and some smart people will grow it.

It’s not as difficult as you might think. There are already many people doing the same thing, but the demand is so high that you are unlikely to fail in this industry. You can learn everything online and get to farm a thing you love. You won’t just be doing it for the money. It will have your heart in it, and you will always try to grow the best possible product. Here are a few things you should know before getting started to help you along the way.

Make Sure You Know Everything About Marijuana

While love is important, knowledge has no replacement. You need to learn everything you can about growing marijuana and the dos and don’ts before making any investments. If you think that you will learn on the job, you are not wrong. However, each lesson comes at a cost. That’s why it’s best to learn all these things before taking any step.

Pick the Best Strains

For the best product, you are going to need the best strains. You need two things for that—a reliable best seed bank and full knowledge of its types and qualities. Be sure to choose the strains that best fit your growing space. Choose a seed bank only from the top ones and build long term professional relationship with it to ensure your business grows smoothly.

Know Your Light Needs

Cannabis plants need a lot of light. You have to specially plan their power needs if you are growing in an indoor space. They need 400W to 600W of light for about 18 hours every day. You will need to buy the best quality lights and other electrical equipment like extractor and fans. Many residential power circuits can’t support more than 1500W, so you will have to take decisions accordingly.

Plan Finances in the Business Plan

Every business needs money to run. You will start to get a profit that you can reinvest later, but you will have to arrange a lot of finances at the beginning. It is suggested to create a full-fledged business plan and answer all questions of all categories after doing thorough research and brainstorming. This will help you efficiently plan your finances. Once you know exactly how much money you need, you can get to the struggles of arranging it. You can easily get a loan when you are sure to get the return according to your business plan.

Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority Names New Director

OKLAHOMA:  The deputy director of the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority will serve as interim director of the authority, officials announced Friday.

Kelly Williams replaces Travis Kirkpatrick, who was recently named deputy commissioner of prevention and preparedness at the Oklahoma State Department of Health.

Kirkpatrick, who will oversee the OMMA from his new position, chose Williams for the interim post. Kirkpatrick had been named director of the authority in January after serving as interim director for about three months.

“This is a young agency and we have seen massive growth over the past two years,” Williams said in a statement. “I look forward to the challenges and the rewards of growing the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority into an agency that will make Oklahomans proud.”

Nevada CCB Launches Investigations Into Three Nevada Dispensaries, Selling Potentially Unsafe Product

NEVADA: The Nevada Cannabis Compliance Board (CCB) has opened investigations into three dispensaries for selling product that twice failed microbial testing.

On March 5, 2020, the Department of Taxation and CCB issued a directive to all dispensary/retail stores to immediately stop selling the product, Cherry OG F3, which failed laboratory testing for yeast and mold, coliforms, Enterobacteriaceae and Aspergillus.

At that time, the CCB instructed dispensary/retail stores to destroy or return the affected product to the cultivator and communicate that they took such action with the State. Despite the CCB’s directive, it appears three dispensaries retained their inventory of Cherry OG and began selling the product again in May.

Approximately 375 grams of the Cherry OG product were sold between May 19, 2020 and June 29, 2020 at the following Retail Stores/Medical Dispensaries:

1. Waveseer of Las Vegas, LLC (Jenny’s Dispensary), 5530 N Decatur Blvd, Las Vegas, NV 89130 (License # 83760475147127946601);

2. Paradise Wellness Center, LLC (Las Vegas ReLeaf), 2244 Paradise Road, Las Vegas, NV 89104 (License # 54283805068313943868); and

3. Desert Aire Wellness, LLC (Sahara Wellness), 420 E Sahara Ave, Las Vegas, NV 89104 (License # 25729455103203031356)

On May 16, 2020, a hold on the product was temporarily lifted due to a CCB error that occurred during an unrelated investigation. However, the CCB’s health and safety advisory remained in effect; and under the directive, dispensaries should not have had the product in their inventory.

The CCB advises those who have purchased the product to avoid consuming it. Consumers should check any Cherry OG products for the source package # 1A404030000076F000006649. The CCB notified the aforementioned dispensaries and initiated investigations which are ongoing. There are no known reports of illness.