Search Results for: recreational marijuana

Reopening Oregon Guidance for OLCC Recreational Marijuana Licensees

Following Governor Brown’s announcement that the State of Oregon is re-opening for business, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission is providing a status update to the temporary and permanent rules and processes put in place during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Governor Kate Brown issued Executive Order 21-15 on June 25, 2021. Subject to limited exceptions, effective June 30, 2021, EO 21-15 rescinded the risk-level framework that placed operational restrictions on many different sectors, including OLCC licensed recreational marijuana businesses.

In response to restrictions placed on licensed businesses during the pandemic, the OLCC created allowances or exceptions to certain requirements to provide flexibility to businesses operating under the restrictions. The OLCC recognizes that there will be a period of transition as licensees reconfigure their businesses now that COVID restrictions have been lifted.

The COVID-19 Business Continuity page on the OLCC website has now been changed to ‘Reopening Oregon Resources.” The information in the table below can also be found here on the Business Continuity Information – Marijuana section under the “Reopening Oregon Resources” tab.

 

Allowance/Change Allowance expiration date Information
Curbside Delivery No expiration – will be discussed in a formal Rules Advisory Committee, including the allowance for walk-up/drive-up sales.  845-025-2885
Pre-licensing Inspections No expiration.  845-025-1090
Accepting expired ID’s – Grace period for ID’s that have been expired for 6 months or less. 12/31/2021  Following guidance from  Governor’s Office, Oregon State Police and Department of Motor Vehicles.

HB 2137 Moratorium Memo

Appointments for payment of licensing fees or violations No expiration.  See below for details
Certain packaging and Labeling Fees

 

TBD   845-025-1060 (8)(e)

845-025-1060(8)(f)

Allowance to work with a marijuana worker permit completed application and completed test 12/31/2021   See below for details

 

In-person payments for licensing fees or administrative violation fines at the OLCC:

The OLCC is still taking license and violation payments in person, in order to make a payment in person you must call the OLCC at 503-872-5151 to schedule an appointment.

If a licensee prefers, they may send a money order or a check. Please note that the OLCC will not approve the payment for 21 days to ensure that the check is valid.

For licensing actions that require payment the licensee may also submit their payment using a credit card through the online licensing portal. All other payments need to be check or money order mailed to the OLCC at 9079 SE McLoughlin Blvd., Milwaukie, Oregon 97222. The check or money order must contain documentation so it is clear who the payment is coming from and what it is for.Examples of the kind of payments include but are not limited to: Worker permits, change of ownership and fingerprints payments.

Marijuana Worker Permits:

We will be continuing to allow applicants to work on an application until December 31, 2021 if the conditions outlined below are met.

  • ​​​Have an approved and active marijuana worker permit;
  • ​Have taken the marijuana worker permit test and submitted their marijuana worker permit application in the NIC/OLCC system https://www.oregon.gov/olcc/marijuana/Pages/mjworkerpermit.aspx prior to working for a licensed OLCC recreational marijuana business.

Please note: Once an application has been approved, the applicant will be notified that the permit application is in Ready for Pay status and will have 30 days to pay the permit fee per OAR 845-025-5520 (4). If payment is not received the application shall be considered incomplete and inactivated. Once inactivated, the worker permit application is not eligible to be used as meeting the above condition to work for an OLCC recreational marijuana licensed business. The applicant will need to reapply.

Should additional information to process a worker permit application be needed in order to complete the application, the applicant will have 30 days from the date of OLCC’s request to provide additional information and/or complete any outstanding action request corrections. Failure to complete the corrections or provide the requested additional information within 30 days from the request shall result in the application being considered incomplete and will be inactivated. Once inactivated, the worker permit application is not eligible to be used as meeting the above condition to work for an OLCC recreational marijuana licensed business. The applicant will need to reapply.

 

OLCC Approves Recreational Marijuana License Stipulated Settlements

Receives updates on Portland’s Cannabis Equity program, Voter-approved ballot measures

OREGON:  At its regular monthly meeting on November 19, 2020, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission approved eight recreational marijuana license stipulated settlements. Additionally, the City of Portland’s Cannabis Policy Oversight Team (CPOT) provided the Commission with an update on the Portland Cannabis Program.

CPOT reviewed its efforts to make equity the center of all decision-making efforts related to cannabis regulation, including ensuring that patients should have access to cannabis for medicinal purposes. CPOT is also reworking its cannabis grant program to focus on distributed funding to BIPOC recipients.

OLCC staff provided assessments of how two ballot measures approved by Oregon voters earlier this month could impact the agency.

Measure 109, which establishes a program for the therapeutic use of psilocybin mushrooms directs the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) to enter into an agreement with the OLCC to use the state’s Cannabis Tracking System (CTS) to prevent psilocybin diversion from therapy program. OLCC has initiated conversations with its CTS vendor the OLCC has deferred further action, until OHA currently busy with pandemic can begin implementing the program.

One provision of Measure 110 reclassifies some drug convictions which will impact the evaluation process of OLCC licensee and permitee applicants. Currently the OLCC rarely makes a license or permit decision based solely on drug convictions, but there are differences between the OLCC’s alcohol and recreational marijuana licensing and permitting criteria that will now be reconciled; this might require the OLCC to enter into rulemaking.

The Commission also ratified the following violation fines and suspensions based on stipulated settlements (detailed information on specific cases can be found here on the OLCC website):

LA MOTA (#28CC) in Portland will serve an 18-day recreational marijuana retailer license suspension OR pay a fine of $2,970 fine for two violations.

Licensee is: La Mota, LLC, Co-Licensee; Aaron Mitchell, Member; Rosa Cazares, Co-Licensee.

VIBRANT HIGHS will surrender its marijuana processor license suspension for one violation.

Licensees are: OGX, LLC; Paul Luttrell, Member; Jonathan Showker, Member; Kathy Cook, Member.

 LA MOTA FRONT AVE in Portland will serve a nine-day recreational marijuana retailer license suspension OR pay a fine of $1,485 fine for one violation.

Licensees are: La Mota Front Ave, LLC, Co-Licensee; Aaron Mitchell, Member; Rosa Cazares, Co-Licensee.

EVIO LABS MEDFORD in Medford will surrender its recreational marijuana laboratory license suspension for four violations.

Licensees are: Smith Scientific Industries, Inc.; Anthony Smith, President/Director/Stockholder; William Waldrop, Secretary/Director; EVIO, Inc., Stockholder; Lori Glauser, Director/Stockholder; William Waldrop, Director/Stockholder.

MR NICE GUY RETAIL in Corvallis will serve a 10-day recreational marijuana retailer license suspension OR pay a fine of $3,630 fine for two violations.

Licensees are: MNG Holdings, LLC; Michael NG, Member; Patrick Martin, Member.

MR NICE GUY RETAIL in Salem will pay a fine of $280 for one recreational marijuana retailer license violation.

Licensees are: MNG Holdings, LLC; Michael NG, Member; Patrick Martin, Member.

NECTAR in Salem will serve a seven-day recreational marijuana retailer license suspension OR pay a fine of $1,155 fine for two violations.

Licensees are: Nectar Markets, LLC; Nectar Holdings, Inc., Member; Jeremy Pratt, President/Director/Stockholder; Jeffrey Johnson, Vice-President; Michael Olson, Secretary/Treasurer.

ALBION FARMS will serve an 18-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension OR pay a fine of $2,970 fine for two violations.

Licensees are: MediRec, LLC; Vandaly Industries, Inc., Member; Eric Buckner, President.

OLCC Seeks Input On Wildfire Impacts To Recreational Marijuana Licensees

OLCC Recreational Marijuana Licensee Wildfire Impact Survey

Survey designed to pinpoint problems, help create collaborative solutions

OREGON:  Wildfires around the state have had a devastating impact on Oregonians.  Authorities still don’t know how widespread the impact is. For evacuees and business owners who lived or worked in the fire zone there are plenty of challenges ahead.

If you’re an Oregon Liquor Control Commission Recreational Marijuana licensee impacted by the state’s wildfires please take 3 to 5 minutes to fill out this short survey.

Some recreational marijuana licensees have already notified the Oregon Liquor Control Commission that their businesses were destroyed by the fire. The OLCC is aware that there are many other licensees located in burn zones around the state. What OLCC doesn’t know is the extent of the damage to those licensed recreational marijuana businesses.

The OLCC wants to be able to help and advise licensees while ensuring that marijuana product remains secure, and accounted for in Oregon’s Cannabis Tracking System.

Licensees directly impacted by wildfire

That’s where we need help from our licensees. If you’re a licensee impacted by the fires please take a few minutes to fill out this short survey. If you know of an impacted licensee please let them know about the survey, and if need be help fill out the survey on their behalf.

Licensees not directly impacted by wildfire

If you have questions related to OLCC’s wildfire response, or have suggestions on how to address the regulatory situation and complexities caused by the wildfires please direct your questions by email to: marijuana@oregon.gov  Use the keywords “Wildfire Response” to start the subject line title.

Wildfire response by OLCC

The agency is working on an approach to address regulatory issues so we can accommodate licensees and help them maintain their operations.

The agency is also considering ways to best utilize our licensing staff to assist wildfire impacted licensees, while still maintaining our commitment to improve licensing processing for new applicants and licensees seeking renewals.

We’ll use the findings of the survey to directly inform temporary rules and licensing actions to help licensed businesses maintain operations to the greatest extent we are able. The more information you are willing and able to provide, the better able we will be to be responsive to the needs of our licensees.

Direct link to the OLCC Recreational Marijuana Licensee Wildfire Impact Survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/296WQD5

OLCC Notice of Public Hearing: Division 25 – Recreational Marijuana Rules Package

OLCC

OREGON: OLCC Notice of Public Hearing: Division 25 – Recreational Marijuana Rules Package

Date and Time:       9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m., Friday, November 15, 2019

Location:                 Oregon Liquor Control Commission

9079 SE McLoughlin Blvd., Portland, OR 97222

The 2019 legislature made several changes to Division 25 of Chapter 845 which constitute Oregon’s recreational marijuana provisions. These rules implement those changes. Additionally, during the operation and management of the marijuana program, staff identified areas that needed amendments to make language more clear and concise and to ensure continued viable operation of the regulated marijuana program. Senate Bill 218 created a pause in marijuana production licenses. House Bill 2098 added a definitions for “kief” and changed the definition for “prescription drug,”
added new requirements for worker permits, and added new forms of qualifying identification.

Public comment period: November 1, 2019 thru December 1, 2019.

Public Notice & Proposed Rule Draft

OLCC Creates Podcast Focusing On Oversight Of Oregon’s Recreational Marijuana Industry

Screenshot 2019-10-30 12.46.45

Flavored Vaping Ban Spotlighted in Latest Episode of “In the Weeds — The Ultimate OLCC Potcast”

OREGON:The Oregon Liquor Control Commission has published the latest episode of its occasional podcast, “In the Weeds – The Ultimate OLCC Potcast.”  Episode Four of “In the Weeds” focuses on the THC vaping respiratory illness crisis and Oregon’s ban on flavored THC vaping products.

“In the Weeds” launched in April 2019 using the podcast format to provide more digestible details and nugget-sized information about the regulations and rules governing Oregon’s regulated marijuana industry. The podcast, aimed at OLCC recreational marijuana licensees, their employees and others interested in the legal marijuana industry, is a more conversational approach to explain the expectations and guidelines for operating a legal marijuana business.

“It’s just the three of us – sometimes with a guest – sitting around talking about the rules, which is something we do every day anyway,” said Amanda Borup, OLCC Recreational Marijuana Policy Analyst, and one of the co-hosts of “In the Weeds.  “And although listening to our discussion should be helpful, it doesn’t mean listening to the podcast is a substitute for reading the rules.”

The other co-hosts of the “In the Weeds” podcast are TJ Sheehy, Manager of the OLCC’s Marijuana Technical Unit, and Mark Pettinger, OLCC spokesperson.

“We figured this would be a good way to help people working in the industry understand what is and isn’t allowed in the rules,” said Sheehy.  “People in the industry, whether they’re in the front office or on the farm in-the-field, can listen and hopefully share what they learn.”

The fourth episode of “In the Weeds” includes a discussion about the ban on flavored THC vaping products; a conversation with Steve Marks, OLCC Executive Director, about the vaping crisis and on-going compliance activities.  The podcast also covers changes in the marijuana license application and renewal process.

The podcast is available through SoundCloud as well as on iTunes, GooglePlay, Spotify, and TuneIn.

OLCC Provides Guidance To Recreational Marijuana Licensees On Vaping Illness Outbreak

OREGON: The Oregon Liquor Control Commission provided its recreational marijuana licensees with guidance regarding the inventory and sale of marijuana products that public health officials are scrutinizing in their investigation of the national vaping related respiratory illness outbreak.

In a letter to licensees Executive Director Steve Marks asked processors and retailers to take a series of voluntary steps to review vaping devices and vaping cartridges containing additives that may be of public concern.

The actions are cautionary steps, in the absence of conclusive evidence, as public health investigators across the country attempt to zero in on a cause(s) for the respiratory illness.

Marks is asking licensed processors to report any previously undisclosed additives in their marijuana products, including Vitamin E oil, “tocopheryl acetate” or “alpha-tocopherol.”

Additionally licensed retailers are encouraged to review their vaping products, and if they think product labels lack clarity consider asking product manufacturers to provide additional information.

The OLCC is also asking retailers to post a consumer information bulletin based on information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A copy of the letter to licensees can be found on the OLCC recreational marijuana website.

Oregon Liquor Control Commission Seeks Input On Recreational Marijuana Regulations

OREGON: The Oregon Liquor Control Commission will hold several Rules Advisory Committees (RACs) beginning in late summer and continuing into this fall. The purpose of an advisory committee is to increase the public’s involvement in the drafting and development of administrative rules.

These meetings will focus on reviewing legislative changes made during the 2019 session and address other issues that have arisen within the licensed and regulated marijuana industry.

In order to fill the RACs, the Commission is asking licensees, partner agencies and businesses associated with the cannabis industry, to apply to be on the committees.

The Commission will use this recruitment process to obtain fresh perspectives on both the condition of the industry’s operating environment and the current state of the rules and regulatory process.

To apply to be considered for appointment to the committee please fill out this survey by August 1, 2019.

The Commission will review all responses and fill the membership of the committees in a manner that best represents the industry and reflects a wide range of perspectives on industry issues.

Following the completion of the committee work, the Commission will hold both a Public Hearing and provide a subsequent two-week comment period in order to acquire additional perspectives on the proposed changes considered by the committees.

Stakeholders and other interested parties will be notified about all committee and hearing dates, and the information will be published on the Commissions’ website.

Click here to apply for the OLCC Recreational Marijuana Program RACs.

Oregon Cities/Counties Prohibiting Licensed Recreational Marijuana Facilities (UPDATE)

OLCC news

OLCC news

OREGON: The list of cities or counties in Oregon that have prohibited the establishment of licensed recreational marijuana producers, processors, wholesalers, and/or retailers has been updated to include Brownsville, Dufur, and Turner.

 

OLCC Provides Oregon Legislature With Recreational Marijuana Supply And Demand Study

OREGON: Today the Oregon Liquor Control Commission provided the Oregon Legislative Assembly with the 2019 Recreational Marijuana Supply and Demand Legislative Report required by ORS 475B.548.
2019 Recreational Marijuana Supply and Demand Legislative Report
A Letter from OLCC Director Steve Marks

Oregon’s Public Policy Approach to Support Legal Marijuana Production and the State’s Abundant Supply: The Course for Seeking the Right Balance

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission is grateful for the opportunity to produce for the Oregon Legislature a comprehensive examination of the amount of marijuana accounted for and contained within Oregon’s regulated recreational marijuana market.
Let me first acknowledge that we have a considerable supply of marijuana in our state’s recreational marijuana system.  That licensed Oregon cannabis growers have become successful in producing this volume of marijuana is due in no short order to the intentional choices made by Oregon voters and policy makers.  Now we find ourselves at a crossroads where our state’s history with marijuana and the future of cannabis commercialization meet.

Oregon’s unique geography and climate are qualities that have enabled generations of Oregon farmers to produce copious amounts of cannabis. The illegal export of Oregon cannabis has been taking place for decades. For Oregon, producing a lot of marijuana is not new news; producing a lot of marijuana that is tracked in the legal system is.

Recognition that cannabis is woven into the state’s cultural fabric initially emerged as institutional tolerance when Oregon became the first state in the country to decriminalize marijuana possession in 1973. Greater acceptance of cannabis occurred in 1998 when Oregon, following California’s lead two years earlier, established a medical marijuana program. A broader embrace of cannabis took place when Oregon voters approved Measure 91 in November,2014, and became the 3rd state to legalize recreational marijuana.

With the debate around legalization largely settled, Oregon’s elected officials began making annual adjustments during legislative sessions beginning in 2015.  Each legislative modification to Oregon’s regulated cannabis system has attempted to improve the industry’s economic stability by removing barriers to entering the market while at the same time enhancing regulatory compliance to address public safety concerns while withstanding federal scrutiny.

Oregon is not creating a new industry, it is converting an illegal cannabis production economy, and a loosely-regulated medical program, into a well-regulated legal market

Oregon oversupply is a sign that policy choices made to attract illegal and grey market producers into the new commercial system have been successful; this was a start-up challenge Colorado and Washington didn’t have to face. Oregon medical marijuana growers had long been suspected of diverting into the illegal market so it was important to attract these well-established producers into the OLCC’s new regulated recreational marijuana program.

To entice medical as well as formerly illegal growers into Oregon’s legal market the state lowered the barriers to entry with low license fees and taxes and chose not to limit the number of licenses. This approach fulfilled the immediate objective to absorb medical marijuana providers into the OLCC market, but it has led to industry churn as businesses face mounting cost pressures and attempt to position themselves for the long term.

The ongoing objective is to account for and contain legally produced cannabis within Oregon, create consumer confidence in the legal market, and establish compliance performance boundaries for marijuana licensees.

By requiring the tracking of marijuana flower and marijuana products, CTS has provided the most reliable accounting for legally produced cannabis in Oregon. For the first time, the state’s production of marijuana is accounted for and there are consequences – criminal and administrative – for licensees that divert product from the regulated system.

Oregon’s legal market has created a new growth industry with quality product, a diversity of choices, and transparent information for consumers

Oregon’s successful transition to a regulated adult-use market has provided customers an unprecedented degree of consumer safety confidence. Oregon’s testing program and packaging and labeling requirements are considered best-in-class and are being replicated by other states that have legalized adult use cannabis. This confidence has contributed to consistent growth in retail activity as evidenced by the $198 million in state and local sales tax revenue generated since legalization.

On the demand side the establishment of a legitimate market has resulted in consumers shifting their purchase activity away from the illegal market to licensed retailers. The conversion of most OMMP dispensaries to OLCC retailers, coupled with the OLCC’s deliberate effort to allow medical grade products for sale at retail, has established a statewide retail network, in which medical marijuana patients are also able to obtain tax-free products.

Industry innovation has continued since the OLCC’s establishment of and oversight over the marijuana supply chain in January 2017; today consumers are able to find a selection of products reflecting a marketplace with 2,100 licensees. As more consumer choices have been introduced and prices have decreased, sales have seen a corresponding increase.

A context for change

Oregon’s current supply in the legal market is a reflection of successful policies to move production into the legal system. The adoption of the legal system by recreational consumers and medical patients for the purchase of branded and tested cannabis products is a strong indication that the legal system is winning the battle against the illegal market.

At the same time, Oregon regulators and law enforcement, with support of the licensed industry, are developing and utilizing new resources and tools to confront illegal market activity. Now that the legal system has successfully taken hold, policy makers can make adjustments combined with market forces to work towards a sustainable economic balance between supply and demand.

The economic condition of the market that the OLCC will be regulating in the next two years remains uncertain. Just as it took time to establish legal alcohol markets after the repeal of alcohol prohibition, the development of the legal marijuana industry will require patience. In less than three years Oregon has made substantial progress toward creating a controlled, economically viable and well-regulated cannabis industry. While regulations to control and manage this new industry will continue to change, no matter the future course, the ability to support existing and aspiring licensees and take enforcement against those that don’t follow the rules will be a crucial function for the state and the private sector businesses that have entered this industry.

A primary objective of establishing Oregon’s regulated market was to contain cannabis legally produced in Oregon from diversion into the illegal market.  Oregon’s legal cannabis market and its framework for accountability and containment indicates the system is performing as it was designed.

At this point we have another opportunity to make intentional choices.  With market mechanisms and thoughtful public policy, the state of Oregon and the OLCC can continue to control what we’ve created – to reinforce and strengthen the regulatory system we’ve built in just three short years.  One corrective policy tool proposed by the Governor would allow the OLCC to place a moratorium on licenses.  As the 2019 legislative session progresses other ideas may emerge.

We expect any guidance that the Governor and Legislature may develop during the 2019 legislative session will strengthen the continued implementation of a regulated marijuana system that balances public safety concerns with the vision of Oregon voters.

The 2019 Recreational Marijuana Supply and Demand Legislative Report is more than just about numbers. Its substance and specific methodology reflect a state-of-the-art approach for evaluating use and demand and normalizing values and equivalencies of differing cannabis products as produced and sold in the Oregon marketplace. While not infallible, this study provides a sound base for the discussion and debate of policy development. The OLCC appreciates the work and time its talented staff and outside peer reviewers have spent to bring forward this public data on legal marijuana production in Oregon.

A copy of the 2019 Recreational Marijuana Supply and Demand Legislative Report can be found on the OLCC on the Recreational Marijuana main page under the Government Resources column.

 

OLCC Commissioners Approve Stipulated Settlements For Recreational Marijuana Violations

OLCC news

OLCC news

OREGON: At its monthly meeting January 17, 2019 meeting the Commissioners of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission approved the following fines and/or marijuana license suspensions or license surrenders based on stipulated settlements:

Odin Distillations* will pay a fine of $2,310 or serve a 14-day recreational marijuana processor license suspension for two violations.

Licensee is Odin Distillations, LLC; Odin Enterprises, LLC, Managing Member; Galt Industries, Inc., Member; Paul Amsbury, President/Stockholder; Mithlond Ventures, LLC, Member; David Loverink, Member; Pluto, LLC, Member; Nasem Issak, Member.

Rogue Farmer* will pay a fine of $7,620 or serve a 44-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension for three violations.

Licensee is Rogue Farmer at Quartz Creek, LLC.; Ryan Beyerlein, Member.

Cultivated Industries* will receive a letter of reprimand for three violations.  The Commission accepted the surrender of the former licensees’ producer license on May 8, 2018.

The former licensee is Nug Run Farms, LLC; RJV, LLC Managing Member; James Deneen Holdings, LLC, Managing Member; Norris Monson, Managing Member; SDFM, LLC, Managing Member; Steve Miller, Managing Member; David Boies, Member.

Evio Labs Bend in Bendhas surrendered its lab license and each licensee agrees to accept a letter of reprimand for three violations.

Licensee is CR Labs, Inc.; Lori Glauser, Co-Licensee, President, Director, Stockholder; William Waldrop, Co-Licensee, Secretary, Director, Stockholder; Anthony Smith, Co-Licensee, Stockholder; EVIO, Inc., Stockholder; Signal Bay, Inc., Stockholder.

Evio Labs Eugene/Oregon Analytical Services in Eugenehas surrendered its lab license and each licensee agrees to accept a letter of reprimand for six violations.

Licensee is EVIO Labs Eugene, LLC; EVIO Labs OR, Inc., Member; Lori Glauser, Manager, President, Director; William Waldrop, Manager, Secretary, Director; EVIO, Inc., Stockholder.

*The locations of OLCC marijuana producer, processor and wholesale licensees are exempt from public disclosure under Oregon law. 

A copy of the Stipulated Settlement Agreements for Marijuana Violation Cases can be found on the OLCC website, on the Laws & Rules page under the Final Orders section.