Search Results for: prohibition

The Happy Munkey Says Farewell To New York Prohibition With 4/20 Celebration

By Stu Zakim

There are some dates that transformed New York: In 1858, Central Park opened; The Holland Tunnel’s opening in 1927; The Beatles playing at Shea Stadium in 1965; and the opening of Studio 54 in 1977.  The latest date that will surely find its way onto that list is April 20, 2021 – the day NYC’s legendary speakeasy, The Happy Munkey, hosted it’s “Farewell to Prohibition” celebration.

Happy Munkey founders Vladimir Bautista and Ramon Reyes are celebrities in the Cannabis community.  When they opened in mid 2017 at an “underground” location, they created a space that offered their invitation only guests a safe, comfortable atmosphere while hanging with very cool people all bonding over Cannabis; black, white, straight, gay, it didn’t matter as Vlad and Ramon often say, “It’s about the culture.” On any given night, you could share a joint with a NFL, NBA or MLB player, a hip hop or rap star, an actor or a famous singer, all there to share their love of Cannabis.

After having to close due to the COVID virus, Munkey fans from all over the world were left with no place to get together.  Sure, we had Zoom calls and more recently, Clubhouse chats, but nothing could compare to the in-person experience.  That all changed after New York State legalized Cannabis on April 1. With the success of people being vaccinated, Vlad and Ramon and David Hernandez decided what better way to celebrate this moment in time than doing what they do best.  And, to take it to another level, no more “underground” location; in typical Munkey style, they wanted to make a statement now that Cannabis was legal and they sure did – Bobby Van’s Steakhouse directly opposite the NY Stock Exchange building.  

What an evening.  The restaurant was COVID safe; tables were at least 6 feet apart, masks were required when not consuming or drinking and bottles of hand sanitizer on each table.  They turned a steakhouse into The Munkey – DJ, people mingling with each other, consuming responsibly, in this case, not sharing, and everywhere you looked was either an old friend or leaders in the weed space: Leo Bridgewater, Joy Beckerman, journalist Steve Bloom (who discovered the 420 phenomenon while a High Times editor), Curved Papers’ Michael O’Malley, Arnaud Dumas De Rauly and Sasha Aksenov of The Blinc Group, Fab Five Freddy, Phoenix Nutraceuticals Ruben Lindo and other notables were there, all rocking out and smoking through the party. 

Looking back on my Cannabis consumption through the years in New York City, I must agree with the cliche, you always remember your first, in this case, my first legal pot party!  What a rush and thanks to the Happy Munkey for all they have done to take the culture to the next level.  And, the best is yet to come.

WSLCB Actions: New Permanent Rule For Certificates Of Compliance For Cannabis Business Locations And Extension Of Emergency Rules On Prohibition Of Vitamin E Acetate

January 6, 2021 Board Action

On Jan. 6, during a regularly scheduled meeting, the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board took the following actions:

Adopted Emergency Rules (CR-103E) Regarding Vitamin E Acetate

Emergency Rules (WAC 314-55-1055) – Marijuana Product Disclosure Form (Effective January 6, 2021)

Emergency Rules (WAC 314-55-1065) – LCB Vitamin E Acetate Prohibition (formerly LCB Vitamin E Acetate Ban) (Effective January 6, 2021)

Emergency Rules (WAC 314-55-077) – Marijuana Processor License – Privileges, Requirements and Fees (Effective January 6, 2021)

Emergency Rules (WAC 314-55-079) – Marijuana Retailer License – Privileges, Requirements and Fees (Effective January 6, 2021)

 

Adopted Permanent Rule (CR-103P)  Certificate of Compliance – location of business upon application submission)

Implementation of SSB 6206 – Marijuana Business Premise Certificate of Compliance (Effective February 6, 2021)

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard’s Defense Bill Amendment Removes DOD CBD/Hemp Prohibition

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02), a senior member of the House Armed Services Committee, secured an amendment to the annual national defense bill that would ensure that the U.S. Department of Defense may not prohibit the possession, use, or consumption of hemp products — in compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local law — by servicemembers. This would apply to hemp that meets the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946 definition (amended by the Agricultural Improvement Act of 2018). The Gabbard amendment was included in the final version of the bill which passed on Tuesday, 295-125, and now goes to the Senate for consideration.

“There is great research being done around hemp, resulting in new products coming to market that are proven to help with ailments like insomnia, inflammation, chronic pain, epilepsy, Traumatic Brain Injury, Post-Traumatic Stress and more. Hemp products provide a form of treatment that serves as an alternative option for those who would rather pursue natural remedies rather than prescription drugs. This amendment passed with strong bipartisan support, ensuring our servicemembers have access to the same over-the-counter products that Americans all across the country benefit from today,” said Rep. Tulsi Gabbard.

The 2018 Farm Bill, known as the Agricultural Improvement Act, legalized hemp, defined as cannabis (Cannabis sativa L.) and derivatives of cannabis with extremely low concentrations of the psychoactive compound delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) (no more than 0.3 percent THC on a dry weight basis). Currently, many over-the-counter products are sold that meet these parameters.

Will A Federal Appellate Court In New York End Cannabis Prohibition?

By David Wenger, Esq.

NEW YORK: Should a 12-year-old girl in Colorado with intractable epilepsy be restricted to the boundaries of Colorado in order to have access to life-saving medical cannabis?

Alexis Bortell suffered from multiple daily seizures and nearly died in her disabled veteran father’s arms several times until she began using medical cannabis—since then, she has not had a seizure in four years. Should she be prevented from travelling with her medication, not receive in-state tuition rates because she was forced to move from Texas, and not receive any Veterans Benefits coverage for her medication?

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Should the parents of a 7-year old boy from Georgia be able to provide medical cannabis to him to keep him alive?

Jagger Cotte was diagnosed at age one with Leigh’s Disease, a rare congenital disease which kills 95 percent of afflicted babies by age four if diagnosed by age two. He became a one-year-old hospice patient, unable to speak, walk, masticate food, and otherwise handle daily activities. He began experiencing near-constant pain, shrieking in agony. Until he began treatment with medical cannabis. He suddenly stopped screaming in pain, has been able to interact with his parents, and against all medical odds, is still alive! Should Jagger’s parents face the Hobson’s choice of foregoing their son’s medical treatment and subjecting him to the uncompromisingly painful and ultimately fatal effects of his illness, or procuring and providing and traveling with medical cannabis for their son in violation of federal law?

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Should a Veteran machine-gunner from Florida who served in Iraq for 14 months be denied Veterans Administration access to the only medication that works for his PTSD?

Jose Belen witnessed severe close-range combat and watched several of his close-friends including his best friend and roommate die violently in front of him. He returned home broken, often suicidal, unable to forget the horrors of what he saw, and was declared mostly-disabled by PTSD. He started treating with medical cannabis—and is now able to cope with his PTSD and lead a productive life. Should the VA prescribe and pay for his medication after his service to the country?

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These are among the questions at stake in the federal appellate court case Washington v. Whitaker (formerly Washington v. Sessions, Case No. 18-859) argued before the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York City on Wednesday, December 12, 2018 challenging the constitutionality of the Controlled Substances Act’s Schedule 1 classification of ‘marihuana.’ Schedule 1 requires a drug to have “no currently accepted medical use in treatment.” (21 U.S.C. § 812(b)(1)).

In the lower court, Southern District of New York Judge Alvin K. Hellerstein dismissed the Complaint challenging Schedule 1’s constitutionality, not on the merits, but on legal procedural grounds. He found that the Plaintiffs were required to exhaust their remedies through the administrative DEA rescheduling petitioning process, which the Plaintiffs claimed is futile. Judge Hellerstein wrote: “I emphasize that this decision is not on the merits of plaintiffs’ claim . . . this decision should not be understood as a factual finding that marijuana lacks any medical use in the United States . . .” (SDNY Case No. 17-cv-5625, Opinion & Order at 12). During the oral argument on February 14, 2018, Judge Hellerstein had said to Plaintiffs’ counsel Michael Hiller: “How could anyone say that your clients’ lives have not been saved by marijuana?”

Reacting to Judge Hellerstein’s decision on procedural grounds, Mr. Hiller commented:

“Resigning the plaintiffs to the petitioning administrative process is tantamount to a death sentence for those patients who need cannabis to live. The time has come for the courts to abandon decades-old precedent, notched with obsolete legal technicalities, and catch up with modern science and contemporary principles of constitutional law . . . . This case will continue to move forward. Notwithstanding the outcome today, we remain confident that the final disposition of this case will include a finding that the classification of cannabis under the [CSA] is unconstitutional – freeing millions of Americans to safely treat their conditions with a plant that maintains their health and their lives.”

On Wednesday December 12, Second Circuit Court of Appeals Judges Dennis Jacobs, Guido Calabresi, and Jed Rakoff (by designation) listened intently to the constitutionality challenge to the Schedule 1 classification. Mr. Hiller told the Court that: 2.1 million patients across the United States rely on medical cannabis to treat illnesses and ailments; the Plaintiffs/Appellants’ ‘right to life’ is infringed by their inability to treat themselves with available medication; Judge Hellerstein had said there was no question on the merits; 33 states have legalized medical cannabis; and the US government holds numerous medical cannabis patents.

The questions and comments from the Panel of judges at oral argument were truly remarkable.

  • Judge Jacobs asked rhetorically: “We have a situation where one part of the government [FDA] said it’s a medicine and another part of the government [DEA] says it’s a crime to use?”
  • Judge Calabresi, citing how courts in other constitutional systems provide guidance to administrative agencies, asked: “Should the Court tell the FDA/DEA to expedite a review of cannabis, i.e. tell the agencies that Schedule 1 will be ruled unconstitutional so the agencies should take expedited action?” In response, Judge Jacobs said: “We might be able to rush it along.”
  • Judge Rakoff, known for making historic, transformative decisions, remarked: “The usefulness of cannabis for medicine has been known for decades.” He asked: “Why can’t the Court just take judicial notice that medical use of cannabis is proven?”

Despite these eye-opening remarks from the judges, the outcome at the Second Circuit is impossible to predict. Among potential outcomes, the Court may: affirm the lower court’s decision without a reasoned decision, affirm the lower court’s decision but with wording in line with Judge Calabresi’s suggestion urging the administrative agencies to reschedule, send the case back to the district court for a hearing on the merits, or as Judge Rakoff suggested the Court can take judicial notice that medical use of cannabis is proven and strike down Schedule 1 as unconstitutional for lack of any rational basis.

The timing is also unpredictable – a decision may issue within a week, usually within six months. Any outcome other than a remand to the lower Court will likely be placed before the Supreme Court.

Throughout history, the courts have been called upon to address fundamental social and societal questions. In instances where Congress and government agencies sometimes struggle to address these questions, the courts are often the source of change, such as with legalizing abortion and gay marriage.

The Second Circuit judges at the argument clearly fully appreciated the absurdity that is Schedule 1’s classification of cannabis. Watch closely.


David Wenger is a New York City attorney and specialist in the US cannabis industry. David is the author of the seminal White Paper on the industry, “The Green Regulatory Arbitrage: A Case For Investing In US Multi-State Vertically-Integrated Cannabis Companies,” published on New Cannabis Ventures. The Paper is available here.

US Senate: Leading Marijuana Prohibitionist Out As Judiciary Committee Chair

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: One of the US Senate’s leading marijuana prohibitionists, Iowa Republican Charles Grassley, will not be heading the Judiciary Committee in the 116th Congress.

Representative Grassley announced on Friday that he is stepping down as leader of the Committee. As Chair, Grassley refused to hold any hearings or votes on marijuana-related legislation, including bipartisan legislative efforts like the STATES Act. Virtually all Senate legislation specific to marijuana policy must pass through the Judiciary Committee.

Representative Grassley received a D- grade on NORML’s 2018 Congressional Scorecard.

Next in line to Chair the Committee is Republican Lindsay Graham (R-SC), who received a C grade from NORML.

Representative Grassley’s decision to step down follows the retirement of House Judiciary Chair Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) and the failed re-election bid of House Rules Chair Pete Sessions (R-TX) – both of whom also used their leadership powers to stifle any legislative debate on marijuana policy.


For more information, contact Justin Strekal, NORML Political Director, at (202) 483-5500.

 

Texas Medicine and Railroad Gin: Lessons From Prohibition

By Michael A. Stusser

The 18th Amendment revoked the sales and use of alcohol in the United States in 1919. Shocking as it may seem that such an act could become law, the roots of Prohibition were complex (people were drinking too damn much canned heat) – and misguided. The government created a campaign to scare Americans about liquor with propaganda that looks shockingly similar to another era of prohibition – the one launched against marijuana use. (Not surprisingly, Americans continued boozing it up – through home distilleries making moonshine, private speakeasies, and mob-led bootlegging.)

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We’re highlighting the shared journey of alcohol and cannabis prohibition – because they’re retroactively such hilarious images – and we can learn many lessons from these historical documents as we continue to fight for the legalization (and decriminalization) of weed. Laws attempting to legislate morality and ban items that are not evil or against public welfare have never worked – but Bless ‘Em for Trying!

Here’s a look at some of the ways both Prohibition and Reefer Madness were marketed to the masses

"Medicinal Whiksky" and "MJ Medicine"

“Medicinal Whiksky” and “MJ Medicine”

Before Prohibition (as with cannabis), alcohol was frequently touted to help with various ailments. Here is a bottle of bonded “medicinal whiskey” labelled “for Medicinal Purposes Only.” Cannabis, of course, has been helping with chronic pain, stress, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, glaucoma, cancer and much more for centuries.

AntiSaloon
An “Anti-Saloon League” was formed to promote prohibition. (The group became popular with many inside the government after passage of the income tax amendment in 1913 – as they were no longer dependent on booze to fund operations.) This is from their newspaper, The American Issue, from Jan. 25, 1919.

Screenshot 2018-07-27 13.54.26While women were major backers of the early Temperance Campaigns, they also rallied for Repeal of Prohibition. Women are, of course, also leading the legalization movement and many are CEOs of prominent cannabis companies and organizations.

TemperanceAbuse
As early as 1871, the campaign against spirits had begun. Here is a Temperance illustration of a drunk man hitting his wife. Much of the prohibition propaganda was sold as a way to protect women and children from boozing hubbies and fathers coming home wasted from work, drinking his paycheck away and raising hell and havoc.

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Straight to the Point. The bottle or your best girl!

Screenshot 2018-07-27 14.03.05
Asking American to choose their country or their cocktail, posters like these advocated for Prohibition during World War I.

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A far cry from biblical verse (“Wine that gladdens human hearts, oil to make their faces shine, and bread that sustains their hearts”), firewater was eventually sold to the masses as dangerous, deadly rotgut.

ReeferMadnessMove
In 1936 the now infamous film Reefer Madness was released, warning Mom & Pops about the dangers of weed by showing a group of pot-smoking teenagers descending into a hellscape of murder, madness, suicide and violence after firing up a fatty. Yikes!

DavilsHarvest
Similar to the Prohibition propaganda attempting to scare wives about drunken husbands, this 1942 film used the Devil himself to put the fear of God into families.

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Like films such as Reefer Madness and Assassin of Youth, Marihuana attempted to scare the Bejesus out of the general public with absurd claims of cannabis leading to wild orgies (if only!), impregnation, heroin addiction and, yes, kidnapping. That’s some strong ganja!

prohibcelebration
PROHIBITION REPEALED! Oh Happy Day! By 1933, Americans had had more than enough prohibition, and public opposition had become overwhelming. First Congress passed an act legalizing beer and wine, and by December of 1933 Utah became the 36th State to ratify the 22nd Amendment – repealing the 18th (Prohibition) and restoring the sale and manufacture of alcohol.

Screenshot 2018-07-27 14.16.44And soon, we’ll have a National Celebration for the Legalization of Cannabis!

Author Michael Stusser is the host of Higher Ground, the World’s first talk show highlighting cannabis culture. Think of it as “The Daily Show” meets “Good Morning America”…but with a giant bong on the desk. For more on Higher Ground and host Michael Stusser, visit www.highergroundtv.com   or www.michaelstusser.com

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer Introduces Bill To End Federal Marijuana Prohibition

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) introduced legislation Wednesday that would end the federal government’s prohibition of marijuana. The proposal is co-sponsored by Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), Tim Kaine (D-VA), and Tammy Duckworth (D-IL).

The bill, titled the Marijuana Freedom and Opportunity Act, would remove marijuana from the Controlled Substances Act, leaving its legal status to the states, while maintaining the federal government’s authority to prevent trafficking of marijuana from states that have legalized it to those that have not. It would also provide grants to state and local governments to develop or expand expungement or record-sealing programs for marijuana possession convictions, and it would direct marijuana tax money to the Small Business Administration to provide loans to marijuana businesses owned and controlled by women and socially and economically disadvantaged individuals. The proposal also allocates funds to marijuana-related public health and safety research. The full bill is available here.

Matt Schweich, executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project commented, “This proposal is yet another sign that Congress is moving toward a major shift in U.S. marijuana policy. Senate leaders from both parties have now signaled their support for ending prohibition at the federal level and adopting a system that respects state laws regulating marijuana for medical and adult use. The debate is transitioning from whether marijuana should be legalized to how it should be legalized. There are still hurdles to overcome in Congress, just as there are for any other issue, but things are clearly headed in the right direction. A strong and growing majority of Americans think it is time to end marijuana prohibition, and states are moving quickly to develop their own marijuana policies. Members of Congress do not want to find themselves on the wrong side of history — or their constituents.”

Merkley Cosponsors Landmark Bill To End Federal Prohibition Of Marijuana

Marijuana Justice Act seeks to reverse decades of policy that has disproportionately impacted communities of color, low-income communities

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  Oregon’s Senator Jeff Merkley has announced his cosponsorship of a landmark bill to end the federal prohibition on marijuana. Senator Cory Booker’s Marijuana Justice Act would remove marijuana from the list of controlled substances, making it legal at the federal level.

Merkley has been a leader within in the Senate on several marijuana-related issues, spearheading bipartisan efforts to enable banks to serve legal cannabis businesses so they don’t have to operate in all cash, and to empower VA doctors to advise veterans on marijuana use in medical marijuana states. In 2014, he was the first U.S. Senator to support legalizing recreational marijuana.

“More than half of the United States has enacted legislation allowing for either medical or adult-use of cannabis, yet federal law remains in conflict,” said Senator Merkley. “This creates significant problems, not only with the prosecution of nonviolent cannabis crimes — which disproportionately hurts people of color — but also with lack of banking services for legally operating businesses. As long as financial institutions aren’t able to service cannabis enterprises, these businesses are forced to operate in an all-cash environment that’s unsafe and lacks accountability. This bill would place cannabis legalization in the hands of states — exactly where it should be.”

“I’m thrilled that Senator Merkley is joining our effort to make our criminal justice system more consistent with the words inscribed above our Supreme Court – equal justice under the law. The War on Drugs has been a war on people – and most often people of color and low-income individuals,” said Senator Booker. “I have seen firsthand the ways these policies have harmed neighborhoods, and I know that far too many innocent people in low-income communities and communities of color are having their futures destroyed by the disproportionate enforcement of these laws. It’s time for us to abandon the destructive federal prohibition of marijuana and focus our energy on righting the wrongs of the War on Drugs and prioritizing public safety and human potential.”

Merkley is the fifth Senator to cosponsor the Senate bill, along with Senators Ron Wyden (D-OR), Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), Kamala Harris (D-CA) and Bernie Sanders (I-VT). In addition to these cosponsors, Representatives Barbara Lee (D-CA) and Ro Khanna (D-CA) introduced a companion measure in the House of Representatives earlier this year that has 35 cosponsors.

In addition to removing marijuana from the list of controlled substances, the bill would incentivize states through federal funds to change their marijuana laws if those laws were shown to have a disproportionate effect on low-income individuals and/or people of color. The bill is retroactive and would apply to those already serving time behind bars for marijuana-related offenses, providing for a judge’s review of marijuana sentences.

Specifically, the Marijuana Justice Act will:

  • Remove marijuana from the list of controlled substances, making it legal at the federal level;
  • Incentivize states through federal funds to change their marijuana laws if marijuana in the state is illegal and the state disproportionately arrests or incarcerates low-income individuals or people of color for marijuana-related offenses;
  • Automatically expunge federal marijuana use and possession crimes;
  • Allow an individual currently serving time in federal prison for marijuana use or possession crimes to petition a court for a resentencing;
  • Create a community reinvestment fund to reinvest in communities most impacted by the failed War on Drugs and allow those funds to be invested in the following programs:
    • Job training;
    • Reentry services;
    • Expenses related to the expungement of convictions;
    • Public libraries;
    • Community centers;
    • Programs and opportunities dedicated to youth; and
    • Health education.

Harris Cosponsors Landmark Bill To End Federal Prohibition Of Marijuana

Marijuana Justice Act Seeks To Reverse Decades Of Policy That Has Disproportionately Impacted Communities Of Color, Low-Income Communities

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  U.S. Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) today became the fourth U.S. senator to cosponsor Senator Cory Booker’s (D-NJ) landmark bill to end the federal prohibition on marijuana. The Marijuana Justice Act would remove marijuana from the list of controlled substances, making it legal at the federal level. Harris announced her support of the bill in a video.

“Right now in this country people are being arrested, being prosecuted, and end up spending time in jail or prison all because of their use of a drug that otherwise should be considered legal,” Senator Harris said. “Making marijuana legal at the federal level is the smart thing to do, it’s the right thing to do. I know this as a former prosecutor and I know it as a senator.”

Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) became the first Senator to cosponsor the Marijuana Justice Act last year, followed by Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) in February, and Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) in April. In addition to these cosponsors, Representatives Barbara Lee (D-CA) and Ro Khanna (D-CA) introduced a companion measure in the House of Representatives earlier this year that has 35 cosponsors.

In addition to removing marijuana from the list of controlled substances, the bill would incentivize states through federal funds to change their marijuana laws if those laws were shown to have a disproportionate effect on low-income individuals and/or people of color. The bill is retroactive and would apply to those already serving time behind bars for marijuana-related offenses, providing for a judge’s review of marijuana sentences.

Specifically, the Marijuana Justice Act will:

  • Remove marijuana from the list of controlled substances, making it legal at the federal level;
  • Incentivize states through federal funds to change their marijuana laws if marijuana in the state is illegal and the state disproportionately arrests or incarcerates low-income individuals or people of color for marijuana-related offenses;
  • Automatically expunge federal marijuana use and possession crimes;
  • Allow an individual currently serving time in federal prison for marijuana use or possession crimes to petition a court for a resentencing;
  • Create a community reinvestment fund to reinvest in communities most impacted by the failed War on Drugs and allow those funds to be invested in the following programs:
    • Job training;
    • Reentry services;
    • Expenses related to the expungement of convictions;
    • Public libraries;
    • Community centers;
    • Programs and opportunities dedicated to youth; and
    • Health education

Farewell To Prohibition 5K Cancelled – Organizers Cite LCB Enforcement of HB 2136

WASHINGTON: The Farewell to Prohibition 5K and Natural Health Expo, scheduled to take place from 10:00 AM-5:00 PM at the Evergreen Speedway in Monroe, WA on March 12, 2016 has been cancelled.

According to event organizer Crystal Newton, “Yesterday, the Liquor Control Board aggressively reminded us of the new rules in HB 2136.  The organizers of this event have determined that the possibility of unauthorized and strictly-prohibited consumption of cannabis over the entire property of the fairgrounds (220 acres), venue and parking lot would pose a risk to the venue’s liquor license.  We had the Snohomish County Sheriff doing our security and monitoring for the event, but this standard is not high enough for the new regulations.  No amount of security can guarantee that an attendee won’t break a rule while at our event.”

Newton explained that under HB 2136, “any organization or business is now liable for violations committed by private citizens in and on their property.  The liability is too prohibitive for anyone to organize educational and community building events like ours. Risking the speedway’s license is not something that the organizers, the venue or the cannabis industry in general are willing to do.”

The last-minute cancellation to the widely-promoted event has left participants, sponsors and vendors scrambling.  “I wish we had more notice, I know a lot of you made plans to come out and we are so grateful. The late nature of this notification is upsetting and disruptive to our economy, business and community.  This is a blatant overreach and exploitation of a regulation.  The ban on public smoking was meant to protect society.  Threatening someone’s liquor license of a venue holder by holding them to an impossible standard is an overreach.”

Newton expects to reschedule the event, and move to a new, friendlier venue. “We are reaching out to t the Puyallup Tribe, and are looking at a date in May, 2016 TBD.  Please check back at the website and our Facebook page to receive updates.  We have more support than ever and we will lawfully and respectfully complete our race.  We will finish this race together.”