Search Results for: endocannabinoid

CNN Conference Teaches Cannabis Medicine, Endocannabinoid System; Seeks Institutional Acceptance By Medical Community

CALIFORNIA: The Cannabis Nurses Network announced the success of its fourth Cannabis Nurses Network Conference, the only ongoing professional development and education conference in the country designed exclusively for Registered Nurses and wellness professionals to advance their understanding of cannabis medicine, the endocannabinoid system and practical applications in day-to-day patient care and practice. The National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) released guidelines in July 2018 for cannabis patient care, proving the immediate need for medical professionals to gain practical medical marijuana patient care education.

For the past 17 years, nurses have been ranked as the most trusted profession, and with nurses being the heart of healthcare and the front line for patients, Heather Manus RN, CEO and founding member of the Cannabis Nurses Network, says it’s a travesty patients have been denied access to cannabis medicine. With the research now available and the support of the NCSBN, every nurse should be educated in cannabis medicine and the Endocannabinoid System, she said.

nurses_cnnc_2019“We are revolutionizing the future of healthcare,” Manus said. “The emergence and discovery surrounding the Endocannabinoid System is a paradigm shift for all practicing nurses. Once you understand it, there’s no turning back.”

The landmark conference, celebrating its fourth year, was hosted and welcomed for the first time by San Diego on Feb. 28. The event kicked off with councilwoman and future mayoral candidate Barbara Bry delivering opening remarks, thanking the hundreds of attendants for their compassionate work and for traveling from all parts of the country. With San Diego being a leader in life sciences and biotech along with its more than 80 research institutes, including the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research, Bry declared the city as being the ideal backdrop for the conference.

“You may know that our city legalized the entire supply chain for adult use, and we did so with few restrictions and barriers to cannabis testing facilities; and I’m very proud I was a co-author of the ordinance that we passed,” Bry said. “The exciting world of CBD research is still a fresh frontier, and it’s wonderful that you are all here today to share your knowledge and to learn new things. There’s a lot more to do to treat the many people out there who need help with cannabis, and that’s why this conference is so important.”

The Cannabis Nurses Network Awards were held the second evening of the conference. Jim Bartell, a local public affairs leader and former mayor of Santee, received an award for his work to draft a bill allowing cannabis to be used in all hospitals and medical facilities in California. Earlier this year, just six months after his son passed away from pancreatic cancer, Bartell drafted a bill that would permit all California hospitals to allow patients who are terminally ill to have access to cannabis treatment should they so choose. The bill has been introduced by California State Senator Ben Hueso, as SB 305, and is scheduled for review by the Senate Health Committee in March 2019. Cannabis Nurses Network has submitted a signed letter of support to Sen. Hueso for SB 305.

Other awardees included Leaders of Nursing; Marcie Cooper, Janna Champagne, James Schwartz, and Uwe Blesching who authored the Cannabis Health Index. Awardees also included the first graduating class of Speakers Bureau trained by Maureen McNamara of Cannabis Trainers

“We can not understate the efficacy of cannabis in medical treatment,” said Manus. “It’s important our nurses, who are at the forefront of patient care, learn all they can about the endocannabinoid system and the proper medicinal use of cannabis. We believe strongly believe that in five years or less, we will get medicinal cannabis approved for use in hospitals, medical centers, and nursing homes nationwide.”

Sponsors for the conference included: Eden Labs, Sacred Garden, Incredibles, Nature Nurse, and Cannabiniers.

Cannabis Nurses Network 2020 will take place in San Diego during Nurses Week, May 6th-May 8th.

Dr. Ethan Russo On Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency

WASHINGTON:  This week I made the trek to Vashon Island to see a talk on Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency by Dr. Ethan Russo at the monthly VIMEA meetup.

Speaking to a full room of cannabis patients, growers, processors, and enthusiasts, Dr. Russo zoned in on chronic medical conditions that demonstrate endocannabinoid deficiency.

One of the biggest things that I took away was his point that the fact that the brain and the gut are very connected. You can’t have a healthy brain without a healthy gut and vice versa. I also appreciated that he mentioned other natural ways to boost your endocannabinoid system: proper sleep, cardiovascular exercise, and consuming an anti-inflammatory diet.

Oregon Conference On Cannabis Therapeutics Explores The Endocannabinoid System and Aging

OREGON: Patients Out of Time will bring their clinical cannabis conference series to Portland, Oregon, offering professional training and continuing education credits for doctors, nurses, other health care professionals.

Pre-conference workshops take place on May 8th at Portland University Place Hotel, with separate tracks for doctors, for nurses, and, new this year, for lawyers (offering CLEs), aimed at those who are going to counsel and represent patients, health care workers, caregivers, growers, dispensaries, banks, landlords and others on the myriad of issues arising in this newly burgeoning area of law. The main conference begins Friday morning at the Hotel and continues May 10th at the National College of Natural Medicine .

The theme for The Eighth National Clinical Conference on Cannabis Therapeutics is: The Endocannabinoid System and Age-Related Illnesses. Presentations will focus on the emerging science of the endogenous cannabinoid system and its effects on health as we age.  The baby boomers are reaching retirement age; this conference will promote understanding cannabis as beneficial not only as a medicine for the ill, but also as helpful in preventing many health problems, keeping systems in balance and protecting us from stressors.

The conference brings this information to Oregon at the perfect moment, with new dispensary laws, with the average age of a patient being 58, and The Oregon Medical Marijuana Program being one of the most successful in the nation, with 15 years regulating cannabis for patients, now numbering nearly 60,000.  Noting that the need for this education stretches across all states in the U.S., Mary Lynn Mathre, President and co-founder of Patients Out of Time, says, “Patients Out of Time chose

Portland in part because of that. Clearly, there are many dedicated health care professionals in Oregon and we want to provide them a solid knowledge base from which to help their patients.” The UCSF School of Medicine will once again be the co-sponsor and provide the continuing medical education credits.

Curt’s Cannabis Corner: Conversation with “Cannabinologist” Dr. Sunil Kumar Aggarwal


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Conversation with “Cannabinologist”

Dr. Sunil Kumar Aggarwal

By Curt Robbins


 

Welcome to this week’s installation of Curt’s Cannabis Corner, a series of educational articles from technical writer Curt Robbins at Higher Learning LV and MJNews Network. This collection is intended for cannabis and hemp industry professionals who wish to gain a better understanding of the nuanced biochemistry of this special—and newly legal—herb.

This week on Curt’s Cannabis Corner, educator, author and host Curt Robbins takes a deep dive into the science of cannabis medicine with Dr Sunil Kumar Aggarwal. Based in Seattle, WA, Dr. Aggarwal, MD, PhD, FAAPMR, is a practicing physician, researcher and self-described “Cannabinologist” http://www.cannabinologist.org/.

Tune into this fascinating podcast as Curt and Dr Aggarwal go granular in a fact-based discussion of our evolving understanding of the endocannabinoid system, medical geography, the practice of cannabis medicine, and the complicated relationship that humans share with the cannabis plant.

Explore more installations of Curt’s Cannabis Corner, the educational series designed specifically to meet the needs of the working professional in legal hemp and cannabis, exclusively on MJNews Network.  

How I Became A Cannabis Pharmacist & Entrepreneur

By Daniel Asarch

Growing up in the 1980s, I was a child of the D.A.R.E program.  Everyday I would be inundated with this is your brain on drugs commercials as well as other anti-cannabis propaganda.  The stoner stigma and  government scare tactics worked for numerous years, but I finally gave into trying cannabis for the first time in college.  After trying it, I didn’t see what the big fuss about cannabis was as it didn’t do much for me except give me the munchies. As the years went by I used cannabis sporadically for recreational purposes and yet still didn’t have much knowledge about the plant.  Even when I attended pharmacy school in the early 2000s, the only two things I learned was cannabis existed as marijuana and Marinol, a synthetic thc pharmaceutical.

Working as a pharmacist I had patients on Marinol to help stimulate their appetites as they were either burdened with HIV or a form of cancer.   All of my patients preferred cannabis over Marinol.  They complained that Marinol had unpleasant side effects and that it didn’t help much with appetite stimulation.  However, my patients were stuck between a rock and hard place as medical marijuana was allowed but at the same time it couldn’t be legally bought anywhere at the time.  Outside of the need for appetite stimulation, some of my HIV and cancer patients were also on opioids or opioid related medications to help control their chronic pain.

In my 17 years of being a pharmacist, one of the hardest things to watch is people becoming addicted to opioids to help manage their chronic pain.  I probably have dispensed thousands of pain pills to patients.  All of them had legitimate scripts, but I’m also sure there may have been a few scrupulous patients that may have slipped through.  Opioid addiction takes a toll on the   mind and body as well as the patient’s surrounding environment.  In recent years, opioid overdoses have been on the rise and devastating lives.

 

You may wonder what the point of my story is so far, well I am about to tell you.  I have pledged to do no harm as a pharmacist and help as many people as I can.  Growing up, like most people I was taught to think inside of the box and that most things are black and white not grey.   Given my life experiences of childhood, college, pharmacy school, and working with patients I can tell you bluntly that’s all a lie.  I started to think outside of the box when I began working as a compounding pharmacist.  Compounding pharmacy allows to work outside the confines of big Pharma and the FDA to some extent.  It is here that I learned that hormones and vitamin supplements do play a part in some of our body functions.  Not all illnesses, disorders, and dysfunctions need a big Pharma medication to fix them.

This is where the pursuit of my cannabis knowledge started.

Even though Cannabis has been around and used for over thousands and thousands of years, we actually have very minimal FDA research on this wonderful plant.  However, we do have peer to peer research and personal use benefits documented by a great world wide population.  Cannabis knowledge can be found all over whether it’s in books, the internet, and via speakers on the topic.  Is it all factual? The majority of the information out there is factual, but the rest is based on myths and reefer madness.  There are at least 2 books that I can recommend: Cannabis Pharmacy and The Cannabis Health Index.  After reading these 2 books, I felt to have a better understanding of how cannabis affects the body.  Also,  I learned about the Endocannabinoid System (ECS) which plays an important in our body’s homeostasis.  Unfortunately, the ECS is only lightly touched on in medical school, pharmacy school, and even nursing school.   Hopefully,  as time goes on the healthcare system will realize the potential of Cannabis as a true medicine.

Over the last 3 years,  I have tried to etch my path in the cannabis industry.  I started my journey out as an associate publisher for Sensi Magazine, a lifestyle magazine with a cannabis touch originally based out of Colorado.  I helped to establish the Las Vegas market.  During my time with Sensi, I had the opportunity to network with many leaders in the cannabis industry as well as watch the cannabis scene mature in Las Vegas.   After being immersed in the cannabis scene for quite a while I decided that it was my time to take my cannabis journey to the next level.

In 2018, the USDA passed the farm bill to allow for the further legalization of industrial hemp.  I saw this as opportunity to start my own business in cannabis under this new provision and see where the road took me.  In late 2019, I opened Happy Hemp Pharm.  Happy Hemp Pharm is a small boutique business than prides itself on handcrafted and quality products.

Unfortunately as you all know Covid hit 2020 and slowed all the events down to complete halt.  Luckily, it allowed more time for product development and placement.  However, the only place that didn’t shut down during the pandemic was social media.  You would think with legalization happening throughout the states and parts of the world it would be easy to navigate the social media waters, that is truly not the case. Since cannabis is still federally classified as a class 1 controlled substance Facebook and Instagram are still quite discriminating towards cannabis related posts.

As we are already almost a quarter way done with 2021, I plan to continue to steadily grow and adapt my business to the ever changing cannabis/hemp industry.

Stay tuned to these pages …


EDITOR’S NOTE: Daniel Asarch will be a featured speaker and panelist at the upcoming G4 Live Budtender Awards.

Curt’s Cannabis Corner: What is Delta-10 THC?

Welcome to the next installment in the new series of educational articles from technical writer Curt Robbins at Higher Learning LV and MJNews Network. This collection is intended for cannabis and hemp industry professionals who wish to gain a better understanding of the nuanced biochemistry of this specialand newly legalherb. 

This week we’re dealing with a newcomer to the world of commercial cannabinoids, delta-10 THC. Please remember to #LearnAndTeachOthers™!


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What is Delta-10 THC?

By Curt Robbins

 

 


All cannabis consumers and industry professionals are familiar with the phytomolecule THC that is produced by the cannabis plant. Many, however, aren’t aware that this popular psychoactive chemical compound is but one of several similar THC molecules produced by the plant called analogs (or, more technically, isomers).

The version of THC that differentiates hemp and cannabis, the measure of which has determined the market value of cannabis flowers and related products for decades, is delta-9 THC. However, a variety of analogs of the THC molecule exist. These include THCA (no psychoactivity), delta-8 THC (about two-thirds the psychoactivity of the delta-9 isomer), and THCV (the varin version that delivers psychoactivity, but only in relatively potent doses).  

Other cannabinoids are produced by the plant as similar isomer families, including cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabigerol (CBG). In fact, each of these cannabinoids manifests as more than half a dozen isomers. (For CBD, these include CBDA, CBDV, CBDVA, and CBDP. Similarly, CBG offers the isomers CBGA, CBGVA, and CBGV, among others.)   

Recently, the delta-8 isomer of THC has gained attention. A variety of companies in the U.S. have begun selling delta-8 products, mostly in an effort to skirt the federal regulations that prohibit delta-9 THC. Meanwhile, an additional isomer of THC has attracted the attention of entrepreneurs: Delta-10 THC. 

History in California

The story of delta-10 THC is rife with irony. The phytomolecule was recently discovered by Fusion Farms in Adelanto, California. During a wildfire, a batch of outdoor grown plants became contaminated by fire retardant chemicals. These chemicals caused one or more of the cannabinoids in the plants to convert to delta-10 (most likely from cannabichromene [CBC], CBD, or delta-9 THCall of which feature very similar molecular structures). 

Thus, delta-10 THC has been dubbed an “artificial cannabinoid” because it may occur very rarely, or almost never, in nature. Modern manufacturing processes, however, offer the ability to produce the molecule in volume by converting closely related cannabinoids.

Some industry professionals believe that, during testing, delta-10 THC is commonly misidentified as similar cannabinoids, including CBC. “A lot of people had been seeing this mystery compound show up as a minor component on their distillate COAs [Certificates of Analysis], but they thought it was CBC,” said Josh Jones, an organic chemist who consults for Fusion Farms.

 

Business Opportunity

The tenuous nature of regulatory oversight of hemp and cannabis products in the United States means that the legal status of delta-10 is both ambiguous and could change at any time. 

The challenge for companies wishing to produce products rich in delta-10 THC is use of a production method that synthesizes the molecules in sufficient volume to satisfy potential market demand and cause true efficacy in consumers.   

The saga of delta-10 THC illustrates how industrious entrepreneurs and managers within the industry will pursue opportunities to develop novel cannabinoid isomers. These molecules will naturally feature a different binding affinity, which is the exact method by which they attach to specialized cellular receptors in the human body (part of the endocannabinoid system). As such, wellness professionals seeking novel approaches to the management of particular disease states and conditions may be able to fine tune the efficacy of molecules to match use case scenarios and bolster the safety profiles of molecules or particular products. 

‘Nurse Heather’ Is Bringing Cannabis Education To A Mainstream TV Audience

CALIFORNIA: For more than a dozen years, Nurse Heather has been on the cutting edge of medical cannabis education.  Beginning April 20th, 2021, she’ll be taking that knowledge, and her cannabis nurses’ perspective, to a mainstream TV audience in her new role as host of “Nurse Talk”  — one of three on-demand programs debuting on 420MEDIA’s ANewCannabisChannel.com

Each episode of Nurse Talk will feature one-on-one  conversations with leading cannabis nurses, doctors, patients, pioneers, and celebrity athletes, exploring answers to common questions about medical cannabis, with a particular focus on understanding the endocannabinoid system, cannabinoid therapeutics, and dosing.

MJNews’ David Rheins had an opportunity to sit down with Nurse Heather this week for an exclusive conversation, during which she explained that her relationship with the plant began as a teenager, where like so many she was introduced to marijuana as a recreational social lubricant.  It was only many years later, as a practicing healthcare professional, that Nurse Heather discovered the powerful medicinal benefits of medical cannabis. A knowledge that she learned directly from from her cannabis-using patients — not through nursing school, professional education, or other healthcare professionals who remained largely ignorant and skeptical of the plant.

As that firsthand patient and clinical experience grew, Nurse Heather began to share that knowledge with other healthcare professionals, and soon became a “go to resource,” public speaker and community leader, picking up the appellation “Cannabis Nurse Heather” along the way. 

Nurse Heather was invited to join an New Mexico dispensary license, assuming the responsibility of sharing with the dispensary staff all she had learned along her journey. She immersed herself on a mission to learn everything she could about the science of cannabis, participating at conferences like Patients Out of Time, Marijuana for Medical Professionals where first discovered the endocannabinoid system.

That knowledge blew “the top of my head off” she told MJNews, “I couldn’t unlearn it, and as a matter of fact I had to share it. It became a passion of mine to help educate my colleagues.”

“Nurse Talk” will debut on April 20, 2021, available for on-demand via Roku, Amazon Fire TV, Android and iOS.

What Is Biohacking? And Why Should You Care?

In today’s emoji-driven, tweet trending, social influencer landscape, keeping up with the latest nomenclature can be challenging.  Lately, we at MJNews have been hearing a lot about ‘biohacking’ or DYI biology.

What exactly is biohacking? And what does it have to do with your endocannabinoid system (ECS)?

Technical writer @RobbinsGroupLLC explains the science of biohacking and the human ECS in this 1750-word investigation of the topic:  https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/biohacking-your-ecs-curt-robbins/

Today Is World Alzheimer’s Day

September 21st is World Alzheimer’s Day, a date recognized by the Alzheimer’s Society globally. This important date marks the need to defend and raise awareness in society about the importance of prevention, early diagnosis and care offered, as well as support and assistance to family members and caregivers of people living with Alzheimer’s disease.

 

According to the WHO, it is estimated that there are around 50 million people with dementia in the world, and this number should triple in the next 30 years. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia and can contribute to 60-70% of cases.

Dementia is one of the main causes of disability and dependence among elderly people around the world. Dementia has a physical, psychological, social and economic impact not only on people with dementia, but also on their caregivers, families and society in general.

 

Research on cannabis and Alzheimer’s continues to develop and may present an additional option for treatment

 

Different scientific studies highlight the use of medicinal cannabis for the treatment of Alzheimer’s symptoms. The main properties of cannabinoids for the treatment of symptoms would be: anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and antioxidant.

 

Global medical affairs director of Spectrum Therapeutics, Dr. Wellington Briques, highlights some of these studies and their results below and is available for interviews.

 

 

Based on the complex pathology of Alzheimer’s disease, a preventive and multimodal drug approach that targets a combination of pathological symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease seems ideal. It is important to note that cannabinoids have anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and antioxidant properties and have immunosuppressive effects

 

 

Studies have demonstrated the ability of the CBD to reduce reactive gliosis and neuroinflammatory response, as well as to promote neurogenesis. It is important to note that the CBD also reverses and prevents the development of cognitive deficits in AD rodent models. Interestingly, the combined therapies of CBD and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), show that CBD can antagonise the psychoactive effects associated with THC and possibly mediate greater therapeutic benefits than any of the phytochanabinoids alone. The studies provide “proof of principle” that CBD and possibly CBD-THC combinations are valid candidates for new AD therapies. Further research should address the long-term potential of CBD and evaluate the mechanisms involved in the therapeutic effects described.

 

The brain cells of Alzheimer’s patients often show a path of rapid decline and destruction. The potential to stimulate brain tissue has recently been discovered as a potential benefit of CBD. In clinical trials, the BDC has demonstrated the ability to reverse and even prevent the development of the negative impact of Alzheimer’s disease. A 2011 study by Australian researchers Tim Karl and Carl Group revealed that CBD promotes the growth and development of brain cells, reducing the decline in memory and other brain functions.

Eaze Announces Major Expansion Of Social Equity Menu In Los Angeles

Menu expansion promotes Black-owned cannabis brands, establishes industry-leading support for equity license holders, and encourages conscious consumption

CALIFORNIA: Eaze, California’s largest marketplace for legal cannabis, today announced expanded efforts to support an equitable cannabis industry: A major menu expansion in Los Angeles featuring Black and POC-owned brands, and the Social Equity Partners Program, a multi-point initiative to assist and elevate equity license holders.

Eaze’s Social Equity Partners Menu, which already features well-recognized brands Cloud 9, KGB Reserve, and SF Roots in Northern California, is debuting all of its equity brands in the greater Los Angeles market and welcoming LA-based Dreamt, Blaqstar Farms, and Bay Area-based James Henry SF and Oakland Extracts to the menu.

The menu makes it easy for consumers to support a diverse industry, and address the War on Drugs’ disproportionate effects on the BIPOC community, by putting their dollars toward these brands. Customers can simply visit Eaze.com to order products, which range from unique flower to prerolls to a sleep-aid vape pen.

In a first move for the cannabis industry, Eaze announced its multi-point Social Equity Partners Program, which provides brands with financial and operational support to help them scale and succeed on Eaze and beyond. Specifically, Social Equity Partners are eligible for a variety of benefits, including:

  • Preferred financing and payment structuring
  • Discounted access to Eaze Partner Portal data
  • Incorporation into the Eaze supply chain
  • Marketing and public relations support

Brands on Eaze’s Social Equity Menu must either hold a social equity license, or be actively engaged in the application process for an equity license in a city or county. Since Eaze launched its equity menu in the Bay Area market, social equity brands have been well received by consumers with high and consistent demand. To date, social equity brands have sold nearly $1M of products on the Eaze platform.

“We’re proud to offer these incredible brands industry-leading terms that support their growth by addressing chronic small business challenges that include access to capital, tight cash flow, and customer education,” said Darius Kemp, Eaze’s Head of Equity and Change. “Shopping these brands is one of the best ways consumers can support equity and consume conscientiously.”

“Consumers are more thoughtful than ever about the products they consume and ensuring they come from a brand that aligns with their values, and cannabis is no exception,” said LA-based Blaqstar Farms’ Founder and CEO Bryant Mitchell. “Eaze is an exceptional partner for Black-owned cannabis brands, allowing us to step into the spotlight and reach consumers who not only want a fantastic product but want to know their dollars are going towards a new generation of Black cannabis entrepreneurs.”

Eaze’s equity menu includes:

  • Blaqstar Farms: The son of the first Black police officer in the city of Orange, Texas, Bryant Mitchell grew up and saw many peers, family members and friends lost to and affected by the War on Drugs. It wasn’t until 2001, after he graduated college and went into consulting in the Bay Area, that he became immersed in cannabis and saw the results of pain relief and so many other benefits. These professional and life experiences led Bryant to establish Blaqstar Farms in 2012 in Los Angeles. A selection of Blaqstar Farms products, including premium flower The Glue, Thin Mint and Orange Rose to prerolls Boss OG, Doc OG, Super Sour and F3, are available the week of September 14 on Eaze.
  • Cloud9: Degi Simmons, founder of Oakland-based Cloud9, has been involved in cannabis commerce and culture since the earliest days of Proposition 215. As a beneficiary of Oakland’s Koncepts Cultural Gallery, an organization promoting art and education funded by Better Us dispensary, Degi partnered with cultivator and DJ Clayton Whitaker to form Cloud9 in 2010. A selection of Cloud9 flower, featuring Sour Diesel for sativa and Runtz for indica, are now available on Eaze.
  • Dreamt is an award-winning science-backed sleep aid created by Carolina Vazquez Mitchell, a nationally recognized cannabis scientist. Dreamt’s 45-night pen and 30-night tincture contain THC, CBD, melatonin, valerian root, and terpenes, and are now available on Eaze.
  • James Henry SF: Co-founders Henry Alston and James Victor are on a mission to improve the stigma surrounding cannabis consumption through quality branded products and Black entrepreneurship. By partnering with accomplished medical doctors and scientists who understand the medical value of endocannabinoid therapy, James Henry SF promotes responsible consumption for a responsible lifestyle. A selection of James Henry SF flower, including hybrids Donnie B and True Ryder and social flower Lemon Jack and Tropical Slice, are now available on Eaze.
  • KGB Reserve: KGB stands for killer green bud, the main ingredient used in all of their products. As a self funded equity company based out of Oakland, KGB Reserve is grateful for its place in the legal cannabis space. They stand for unity and believe in equality. Currently known for their top shelf infused products, KGB Reserve has consistently been on Eaze’s list of top 10 pre-roll brands in the Bay Area since its launch. KGB Reserve’s Sauce Pen, Bambino and Torpedo products are now available on Eaze.
  • Oakland Extracts: Oakland Extracts, a Black-owned business, began as a way to bring the community together. Founders Terryn Niles Buxton and Aaron Tran saw prices climbing with legalization and realized there was a need for people in Oakland to have access to quality cannabis at an affordable price. Over the years, they fine-tuned a proprietary technique that allows for maximum terpene retention. Oakland Extracts’ Red Congolese Cookie Crumble Wax is now on Eaze.
  • SF Roots: Founder and CEO Morris Kelly started in the cannabis industry 13 years ago making edibles under Proposition 215 for local collectives, then launched Greencuredelivery cannabis delivery service in 2015. “Equity is about leveling the playing field for companies who paved the way for this economic green rush,” said Kelly. “We’re this industry’s originators, it’s about getting consumers to support equity brands every day. We are partnering with Eaze to ensure that happens.”

Eaze has long worked to help build a more equitable cannabis industry. With access to capital serving as one of many barriers for new entrepreneurs in the space, Eaze launched Momentum—a business accelerator to cultivate the growth and success of underrepresented cannabis business founders—in September 2019. Eaze’s social impact work also includes a partnership with Code for America to help clear 250,000 low level criminal offenses; a permanent 25% discount for U.S. veterans; partnerships with Success Centers SF and the San Francisco AIDS project; and a $25,000 contribution to the NAACP, among others.

To learn more about Eaze’s Social Equity Partners Program, read our latest blog from Darius Kemp.