Search Results for: employment law

Michigan Appeals Court Rules That Medical Marijuana Law Trumps Unemployment Law

MICHIGAN:  A new ruling in a Michigan appeals court stated that if an employee gets fired only because they use medical marijuana, they still qualify for unemployment benefits. Three lower Michigan courts’ rulings were upheld: In Michigan, medical marijuana laws trump unemployment laws. In other words, if you live in Michigan and get fired because you smoked marijuana legally, you can still get unemployment money while you look for another job. The court ruled that it doesn’t matter what an employer’s policy is, Michigan’s medical marijuana law forbids penalties “in any manner” as long as the marijuana was used legally.

The attorney general’s office in Michigan claimed the state law protects people from criminal prosecutions, but did not protect them from unfavorable rulings in civil disputes such as unemployment pay, according to CBS News. The courts disagreed with the attorney general’s office. The Michigan Medical Marihuana Act, according to the court’s decision, supersedes the the Michigan Employment Security Act. Thankfully for medical marijuana patients, the MMMA purposely uses plain language.

“The plain language of the MMMA’s immunity clause states that claimants shall not suffer a penalty for their medical use of marijuana,” the court opinion stated.

The ruling came about after three employees were fired between 2010 and 2012 when they violated their employers “drug free” policies. The three employees had tested positive for medical marijuana, but were using marijuana in a way Michigan law says is legal. Forklift operator Rick Braska, CT tech Jenine Kemp, and furniture repairman Stephen Kudzia were the three medical marijuana patients at the center of the controversial case, according to Hemp. The employers of these three Michigan medical marijuana patients never accused their employees of being under the influence of the marijuana at any time on the job.

 

 

5 Ways Medical Pot Complicates Employment Law

NEW YORK:  New York lawmakers voted to legalize marijuana for medical purposes on June 20, becoming the 23rd state to do so. Despite a continued federal ban, most Americans live in jurisdictions where weed has been at least partially legalized. This makes for an especially complicated environment for employers, workers and labor unions.

Here’s five things you need to know about medical marijuana and workplace law in New York, which I compiled with help from Cindy Schmitt Minniti, a partner at Reed Smith LLC in Manhattan who represents management in employment law.

1.) The law may not be as narrowly written as it seems. Unlike California’s medical pot law, New York only allows it for nine specific conditions, and only legalizes marijuana in edible, oil or vaporized form — not smoking, the most common method of ingestion. Also, distribution is strictly limited. It might be tempting to think it won’t come up at your office, but that’s a mistake. For starters, one of the qualifying conditions is cancer, a condition faced by between one-third and one-half the population at some point in their lives.

 

 

Yes, You Can Still Be Fired For Using Cannabis: Making Sense of Employment Discrimination Post-Legalization In Illinois

 

By Jaye R. Lindsay, Esq., Crossroad Legal

Like most well-intentioned laws, the sweeping legislation known as the Illinois cannabis Regulation and Tax Act (CRTA), passed in December 2019, included wide-ranging implications for employees and employers throughout the State. For one, the law effectively made it completely legal to consumer or possess cannabis for personal recreational use. But this left open the question of whether a person could be fired for testing positive for cannabis or cannabinoid compounds. Obviously, employers want to make sure they have a right to prohibit people from operating heavy equipment or showing up to work high. But how does an employer do that?

After all, unlike alcohol, THC remains in your system for days or even weeks. A person could test positive for THC weeks after use and at a time when there is no residual impact on functioning at all. Thus, it presents the challenge of balancing the need to allow employers to ensure a safe work environment and the right of the people to use a lawful substance that has many known benefits, including medicinal uses. Cannabis lawyers across the state remain divided on how to best advise clients on this issue. But it does appear, at least for the time being, that the Illinois General Assembly agrees people can be terminated for lawful use of cannabis. Here’s what you should know.

Conflicting Laws

There is now some conflict between two laws in Illinois. First, Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed into law the amendments contained in Public Act 101-0593, which allows an employer to revoke an offer of employment if it is discovered the applicant used cannabis prior to starting the job.

Compare this with newly passed amendments to CRTA, which made no changes to the existing language from the Right to Privacy in the Workplace Act. Under that law, employers in some situations are restricted from discriminating against employees based on the use of lawful products. The term “lawful products,” carries some implications, but even the law acknowledges that where legal substances are consumed off the employer’s premises and not during work hours, discrimination is prohibited.

How the Conflict of Laws Creates Tension for Employers and Employees

As one can imagine, this all presents a big problem. After all, THC can show up in tests weeks after use and long after any possible effects would have worn off. This distinguishes cannabis from alcohol and many other substances that can only be detected during active intoxication. So, how should employers handle the situation. If they allow employees to test positive for THC, they could face serious liability if someone is hurt on the job. Imagine someone operating power tools or heavy machinery while intoxicated. But if the employer terminates the employee or passes up an applicant based on past use, then a discrimination claim may be made.

Key Provisions of CRTA Attempted to Address the Problem

Under the CRTA legislation, the law is clear about what it does not do:

  • An employer can still terminate employees for using or possessing cannabis on the job
  • Nothing in the law stops an employer from having a reasonable zero tolerance policy with respect to use and possession on the job
  • Nothing in the law prohibits an employer from disciplining or terminating employees for violating their policies
  • Nothing in the law forces employers to allow employees to work under the influence
  • The law does not create a specific right of action to sue employers for failing to comply. This simply means that a plaintiff would still need to prove all the typical elements of a claim for discrimination, without special consideration under this law.

However, the law also goes on to say that an employer can consider an employee impaired if they have a “good faith belief” that the employee is showing signs of “articulable symptoms while working” and which limit or diminish that employee’s work performance. The law provides specific examples, such as effects on:

  • Speech
  • Physical dexterity
  • Agility
  • Coordination
  • Demeanor
  • Irrational or unusual behavior
  • Negligence or carelessness in operating equipment or machinery
  • Disregard for the safety of the employee or others
  • Involvement in any accident that results in serious damage to equipment or property
  • Disruption of a production or manufacturing process
  • Carelessness that results in any injury to the employee or others.

Options to Appeal an Employer’s Disciplinary Actions

The law also provides that if an employer decides to terminate or discipline an employee based on one of the good faith factors above, then the employer must provide a mechanism for the employee to contest that decision and make a reasonable dispute regarding the facts.

Early Court Decisions 

Illinois’ legalization law is still very new, so there have not been many legal challenges in the courts yet.  Other state statutes, however, have been challenged through litigation. For instance, in Whitmire v. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., 359 F. Supp. 3d 761, 791 (D. Ariz. 2019), the federal court reviewing a discrimination suit based on Arizona law held that without evidence that the employee actually “used, possessed or was impaired by marijuana at work on [a date], it is clear that Defendant discriminated against Plaintiff in violation of [the state’s Medical Marijuana Act] by suspending and then terminating Plaintiff solely based on her positive drug screen.”

What this Means for Employers and Employees in Illinois

This decision, though not legally binding on any Illinois court, does give some hope to cannabis advocates and those supporting the move to decriminalize cannabis in all its forms. It seems that employers may wish to have clearer policies that directly address the company’s no tolerance rules and how those will be enforced. Likewise, for employees who are disciplined and/or terminated for cannabis use, there is a strong chance that they could make successful claims for discrimination in the future. Of course, this analysis does not even touch upon the potential concerns relating to medicinal cannabis use and how discrimination may actually constitute a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act or other laws designed to protect the rights of those with healthcare needs.

For those facing workplace discrimination based on cannabis use, it’s always a good idea to consult with someone who understands employment law and cannabis regulation. Skilled cannabis lawyers are available throughout the state, and we will continue working to stay abreast to changes in legislation.


About the Author: Jaye R. Lindsay is an experienced trial lawyer in southern Illinois, serving the region from the firm’s offices located in O’Fallon, IL and Mount Vernon, IL. He owns Crossroad Legal, a veteran-owned and operated law firm, focusing on criminal defense and personal injury. He and his firm are ardent supporters of fundamental liberties and strong advocates of cannabis legalization and criminal justice reform. Jaye can be reached at (618) 515-5555 or by visiting the firm at www.Crossroadlegal.com.

New Jersey Governor Murphy Signs Historic Adult-Use Cannabis Reform Bills Into Law

NEW JERSEY:  Governor Phil Murphy today signed historic adult-use cannabis reform bills into law, legalizing and regulating cannabis use and possession for adults 21 years and older (A21 – “The New Jersey Cannabis Regulatory, Enforcement Assistance, and Marketplace Modernization Act”) and decriminalizing marijuana and hashish possession (A1897). The Governor also signed S3454, clarifying marijuana and cannabis use and possession penalties for individuals younger than 21 years old.

“Our current marijuana prohibition laws have failed every test of social justice, which is why for years I’ve strongly supported the legalization of adult-use cannabis. Maintaining a status quo that allows tens of thousands, disproportionately people of color, to be arrested in New Jersey each year for low-level drug offenses is unjust and indefensible,” said Governor Murphy. “This November, New Jerseyans voted overwhelmingly in support of creating a well-regulated adult-use cannabis market. Although this process has taken longer than anticipated, I believe it is ending in the right place and will ultimately serve as a national model.

“This legislation will establish an industry that brings equity and economic opportunity to our communities, while establishing minimum standards for safe products and allowing law enforcement to focus their resources on real public safety matters,” continued Governor Murphy. “Today, we’re taking a monumental step forward to reduce racial disparities in our criminal justice system, while building a promising new industry and standing on the right side of history. I’d like to thank the Legislature, advocates, faith leaders, and community leaders for their dedicated work and partnership on this critical issue.”

“At long last, New Jersey is turning the page on our previous treatment of marijuana use,” said Dianna Houenou, incoming Chair of the New Jersey Cannabis Regulatory Commission (CRC). “I am excited to get to work building on the successes of the medical program and standing up the adult-use cannabis industry. It’s an honor to be part of this historic movement in New Jersey.”

“The failed War on Drugs has systematically targeted people of color and the poor, disproportionately impacting Black and Brown communities and hurting families in New Jersey and across our nation,” said U.S Senator Cory Booker. “Today is a historic day, and I applaud Governor Murphy, the legislature, and the many advocates for racial and social justice whose leadership is ensuring that New Jersey is at the forefront of equitable marijuana legalization policy. I will continue to work with my colleagues in the Senate to end the federal marijuana prohibition so we can finally begin healing the wounds of decades of injustice.”

“This is a historic reform that will have a real-life impact on social justice, law enforcement and the state’s economy,” said Senate President Steve Sweeney. “We can now move forward to correct social injustices at the same time that marijuana is made legal for adults. This  will launch a new cannabis industry with the potential to create jobs and generate economic activity at a time when it is desperately needed. The decriminalization law is the most sweeping measure of its kind in the country and is a groundbreaking step in our continued effort to make criminal justice reforms that are fairer and more effective. This will help reduce the racial disparities and social inequities that have long plagued our criminal justice system.”

“For the last fifty years, marijuana criminalization has been used as a tool to propel mass incarceration,” said Senator Sandra Cunningham. “It has done immeasurable harm to Black and Brown communities around the country, and today we begin to right the ship here in New Jersey. I look forward to seeing the tangible impact this legislation has on our communities in the years to come.”

“I am proud to have been a driving force behind the most progressive decriminalization law in the country and I am grateful to finally see it enacted,” said Senator Teresa Ruiz. “Every day roughly 100 people in New Jersey are arrested for marijuana possession, this law is a move that offers individuals a second chance and ensures they do not become entangled in the criminal justice system. This is yet another step towards bringing justice and equity to our communities. Going forward, we must continue to look for creative solutions to reverse the generational impact the War on Drugs has had.”

“This will usher in a new era of social justice by doing away with the failed policy that criminalized the use of marijuana,” said Senator Nicholas Scutari, the leading advocate of legalizing adult-use marijuana in New Jersey over the past decade. “Too many people have been arrested, incarcerated and left with criminal records that disrupt and even destroy their lives. We don’t want the criminal justice system to be an unfair barrier to success. By implementing a regulated system that allows people age 21 and over to purchase limited amounts of marijuana for personal use we will bring marijuana out of the underground market where it can be controlled, regulated and taxed, just as alcohol has been for decades. New Jersey will now be a leader in legalizing a once stigmatized drug in ways that will help the communities hurt the most by the War on Drugs and realize the economic benefits of the new adult-use cannabis market.”

“We’re moving closer to the long-overdue need to end cannabis prohibition,” said Assemblywoman Annette Quijano. “So much time, effort, and thought have gone into this legislation. We’ve continued conversations, for what I believe, has produced a stronger piece of legislation with a focused eye toward social justice and equity. This is the beginning of a new era of economic opportunity, social justice for marijuana possession, and hope for a better future for thousands of New Jersey residents.”

“With legalization comes an unprecedented opportunity for residents to clean the slate with expungement provisions and for communities to grow their economic base with businesses,” said Assemblyman Jamel Holley. “A key component of cannabis legalization is addressing social justice concerns. The fact that Black New Jerseyans are 3 or 4 times more likely to be arrested on cannabis charges has contributed to the disenfranchisement of black communities. We have the opportunity here to also right the wrongs in our society in regards to past criminal possession of cannabis. No matter where you stand in the legalized marijuana debate, there has been a clear understanding that minorities within our urban communities have been hit hardest in the so-called War on Drugs. During this entire campaign for legalization, there has been one united vocal stance: There was harm done in the past and it must be corrected.”

“This new law includes real, enterprising opportunities for New Jersey communities that have been disproportionately impacted by cannabis prohibition, along with more defined employment opportunities and a commission that requires diversity,” said Assemblywoman Britnee Timberlake. “This will be a clear revenue generator for the State, and the social justice and diversity portion in the legislation remains imperative.”

“Undoubtedly, this is the largest regulatory undertaking the state has considered since the Casino Control Commission,” said Assemblywoman Angela McKnight. “Remaining at status quo meant continued disparity in arrests for African Americans and teens for amounts now to be considered personal use.  We are moving the state in a direction more compassionate for cannabis and in line with what is happening across the country in regards to legalization.”

“This has been a long time coming in our State,” said Assemblyman Joseph Danielsen. “who chairs the Assembly Federal Relations and Oversight Reform Committee led the discussion on the bill in today’s hearing. “Social justice for black and brown communities, which have been generationally impacted by cannabis prohibition, and equity in business are priorities in this legislation. We cannot fairly, or effectively provide regulation without ensuring these communities stay at the forefront of the conversation.”

“New Jersey voters on November 3rd issued the Legislature a mandate: to provide the infrastructure for the legalization of cannabis in New Jersey. Today, we move on that directive by presenting legislation for discussion with fellow legislation and statewide stakeholders,” said Assemblyman Benjie Wimberly. “The War on Drugs in many ways became a war on particular communities, incarcerating millions of black and brown people and affecting families irreparably for decades. Our work on refining this legislation aims to correct the economic and social justice disparities surrounding cannabis use.”

“With Governor Murphy’s signature, the decades-long practice of racist marijuana enforcement will begin to recede, in a shift that emphasizes the urgency of building the most equitable framework possible for cannabis legalization,” said Amol Sinha, Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey, which is a founding member of New Jersey United for Marijuana Reform. “With this historic reform, New Jersey also shifts our approach to youth possession and use by moving away from the punitive status quo to a framework that values public health, harm reduction, and the well-being of young people. Our state’s cannabis laws can set a new standard for what justice can look like, with the removal of criminal penalties for possession and an unprecedented portion of tax revenue dedicated to addressing the harms wrought by the drug war. Signing these laws puts in motion the next phase of this effort: to work relentlessly to transform the principles of legalization into greater racial and social justice in New Jersey. This is a new beginning – and the culmination of years of advocacy – and we must keep in mind that it is only the start.”

Under A21, the Cannabis Regulatory Commission (CRC) will promulgate regulations to govern the medical and adult-use industries and oversee the applications for licensing of cannabis businesses. The legislation further provides for the Legislature to reinvest cannabis revenues in designated “impact zones”; directs the CRC to promote diversity and inclusion in business ownership; and contains critical employment protections for people who engage in lawful behavior with respect to cannabis.

A1897 reforms criminal and civil penalties for marijuana and hashish offenses, as well as provides remedies for people currently facing certain marijuana charges. The bill prevents unlawful low-level distribution and possession offenses from being used in pretrial release, probation, and parole decisions and provides certain protections against discrimination in employment, housing, and places of public accommodation. The bill also creates a pathway to vacate active sentences for certain offenses committed before enactment of the enabling legislation.

The Governor today also signed S3454 into law, clarifying penalties for marijuana and cannabis possession and consumption for individuals younger than 21 years old. The legislation corrects inconsistencies in A21 and A1897 concerning marijuana and cannabis penalties for those underage.

“I have been working on decriminalizing adult-use marijuana for well over three years now, and I am happy to finally see it become a reality,” said Senator Ronald Rice. “This is a common-sense and just law that gives an equal playing field for folks in communities of color. Many have argued that legalizing adult-use marijuana has been for social, economic and criminal justice, however, decriminalization for me, is equally as important. I will continue to watch closely and fight to ensure communities of color are treated equally.”

“This is only one piece in the many parts of change that must be done in the name of social justice for our communities. The War on Drugs in many ways became a war on particular communities, incarcerating millions of people and affecting families irreparably for decades,” said Assemblyman Benjie Wimberly. “The action we take now to help our black and brown communities who have been disproportionately affected by current laws surrounding cannabis use is critical to trauma for future generations.”

“There have been far too many people, especially those from Black and Hispanic communities, who have been negatively impacted by the criminalization of cannabis,” said Assemblywoman Annette Quijano. “There have been long-term impacts on the lives of all people in this state, but considerably those of color. This law is the product of taking a hard look at our current laws, listening to the will of the majority of New Jerseyans and taking a common-sense approach to cannabis offenses.”

“Black New Jerseyans are up to four times more likely to be arrested on cannabis charges than White people. It is a sad fact, a further painful reminder that so people in our communities have been disenfranchised for far too long,” said Assemblyman Jamel Holley. “There have always been glaring social justice concerns and obvious inequity in the high number of arrests of minority residents. Now, finally, this is the time for it to stop.”

“It’s time for the change we seek,” said Assemblywoman Angela McKnight. “New Jersey residents are not happy with the status quo and we need to move in a direction of compassion for the communities that have long been targeted by current regulatory criteria. The call for action, for social justice reform, is resounding throughout our nation. And it begins in New Jersey today.”

“Decriminalization and expungement for those who have been disproportionately incarcerated for marijuana offenses is well overdue in New Jersey and many other states throughout this nation,” said Assemblywoman Britnee Timberlake. “A criminal marijuana charge has a detrimental effect on an individual’s opportunity to access higher education, obtain gainful employment, receive housing support, and address child custody issues.  Not all communities are impacted equally by marijuana enforcement, measures to reduce the collateral consequences of criminal records are ones of racial, social, and economic justice. This is about social justice for a people who have endured the inequities in the law for generations.”

In July 2019, Governor Murphy signed legislation (“The Jake Honig Compassionate Use Medical Cannabis Act”) to reform New Jersey’s Medicinal Marijuana Program (MMP) and expand patient access to medical marijuana, ensuring this life-changing medical treatment is affordable and accessible for those who need it most.

In December 2019, Governor Murphy signed one of the most progressive expungement reforms in the nation, giving individuals entangled in the criminal justice system the opportunity to fully participate in society. S4154 eliminated fees for expungement applications and additionally created a petition process for “clean slate” expungement for residents, as well as required the State to implement an automated clean slate expungement system. Furthermore, the bill required that low-level marijuana convictions be sealed upon the disposition of a case, preventing those convictions from being used against individuals in the future.

 

Arizona: Federal Judge Rules Medical Cannabis Patient’s Firing Violated State Law

MJLegalThe case is Whitmire v. Walmart Stores Incorporated

ARIZONA: A private employer acted improperly when it fired a state-registered medical cannabis patient for failing a urinalysis drug screen, a federal judge ruled last week.

United States District Judge James A. Teilborg opined that Walmart violated Arizona law by terminating an employee solely for testing positive for the presence of THC metabolites in her urine. The carboxy-THC metabolite is an inert breakdown product of THC which may remain present in urine for weeks or even months following cannabis exposure.

Under Arizona’s voter-initiated medical cannabis access law, an employer may not discriminate in hiring or firing based solely upon a patient’s “positive drug test for marijuana components or metabolites, unless the patient used, possessed or was impaired by marijuana on the premises of the place of employment or during the hours of employment.”

According to the US Department of Justice, urinalysis tests “detect drug use but not drug impairment. A positive test result … does not indicate abuse or addiction, recency, frequency, or amount of use, or impairment.”

In recent years, judges have similarly upheld patient protections in other jurisdictions, including ConnecticutMassachusetts, and Rhode Island.

The case is Whitmire v. Walmart Stores Incorporated.


cFor more information, contact Keith Stroup, NORML Legal Counsel, at (202) 483-5500.

 

May 11 In Portland: “Don’t Go Up in Smoke” —Workplace Law for Canna-Businesses

OREGON:  As the cannabis industry expands, so do the number of workers in weed.  Managing a rapidly expanding organization can present a myriad of challenges for any new business, and business operators in the heavily-regulated licensed marijuana industry face additional complexities.  Employment law and the legal cannabis industry is the topic of  “Don’t Go Up In Smoke,” a half-day seminar exploring employment-related legal issues, including personnel management, pay practices, avoiding government investigations, and protecting your trade secrets and other confidential information.  The event, a production of the Oregon Entrepreneurs Network and sponsored by Fisher Phillips, takes place on May 11th, 11AM-4PM at The Cleaners at the Ace Hotel, 1025 SW Stark St., Portland.

Fisher Phillips attorneys from California, Oregon, and Washington, and a number of leading industry experts will explore these issues in-depth and provide practical tips for compliance:

Panelists

Alex Wheatley

Alex Wheatley

Attorney, Fisher Phillips

Alex is an attorney in the firm’s Portland office, specializing in representing businesses in the cannabis industry. He has worked with a number of growers, processors, and retailers to implement effective workplace policies and has represented businesses in the industry when they have received complaints and lawsuits. Alex gets great satisfaction helping canna-businesses comply with the law and protect themselves from exposure to lawsuits and administrative claims. Having worked with a number of employers in the industry, Alex understands the unique issues faced by such businesses and has experience solving the problems such businesses commonly face.

Ashley Preece-Sackett

Ashley Preece-Sackett

Executive Director, Ethical Cannabis Alliance (ECA)

ECA is a nonprofit and voluntary certifying body for cannabis/hemp labor and environmental best practices nationwide. Ashley holds a degree of Horticulture Science from Boise State University and is on the brink of two decades of experience in horticulture sciences. She co-founded Cascadia Labs, one of the leading cannabis analytical labs in the nation, as well as helped launch the Portland Chapter Women Grow networking group, which is still the largest-growing cannabis networking platform in the nation.

Clarence Belnavis

Clarence Belnavis

Partner, Fisher Phillips

Clarence Belnavis is a partner in the Portland and Seattle offices. He is a trial attorney with a primary emphasis in employment litigation, including disability, racial and gender discrimination, retaliation, sexual harassment, and wrongful discharge. He also represents employers in wage and hour claims, employment class actions, and traditional labor matters. Clarence routinely provides client trainings and speeches to cannabis industry groups regarding current and developing employment law issues in Washington and Oregon.

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David Rheins

Founder, Marijuana Business Association (MJBA)

The MJBA is the leading business organization in the fastest growing industry in America. The MJBA provides business intelligence, professional networking, and commercial opportunity for participants in the legal cannabis industry. David is a frequent speaker and moderator at Seattle Hempfest, CannaCon Shows, Cannabis Creative Conference, Cannabis World Congress and Business Expo, and a regular columnist for Freedom Leaf Magazine. A proven business leader with 30+ years of experience building and operating best-of-breed media and marketing organizations, David has an impressive track record as a senior executive for Rolling Stone, SPIN, I Village, Corbis, Time Warner and America Online.

Jason Geller

Jason Geller

Regional Managing Partner, Fisher Phillips

Jason Geller is the managing partner of the firm’s San Francisco office. Jason represents employers in all facets of employment law matters. Jason has extensive experience defending employers in federal and state courts, as well as in investigations by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the DFEH, United States Department of Labor (DOL) and the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). In addition to defending his clients in litigation, Jason frequently counsels employers to assist them in avoiding litigation.

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Kara Bradford

Chief Talent Officer of Viridian Staffing

Kara co-founded Viridian Staffing in 2013, the first bona fide professional, full-service staffing, recruiting and HR consulting firm in the cannabis industry. Kara’s 15-year career has spanned multiple Fortune 100 companies and start-ups in a wide variety of industries where she specialized in Talent Acquisition, Workforce Planning, Employer Branding and Organizational Design. Kara has an MBA in Human Resources & Organizational Behavior and is PRC, CIR, and CSSR Certified.

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Neil Juneja

Founder, Gleam Law

Neil Juneja is the founder of Gleam Law, a cannabis-focused law firm with offices in Seattle, Washington and Portland, Oregon and is a licensed patent attorney. The majority of his practice focuses on trademark protection of cannabis brands in state and federal law. In addition, Neil has written numerous article on cannabis law and intellectual property as well as spoken at many events including in the National Mall in Washington DC and at the Seattle Hempfest. Some of Gleam Law’s notable clients include the first Seattle recreational marijuana retailer, several world-famous musicians branding cannabis products, and many publicly traded companies working in the cannabis industry. Neil has also appeared in Newsweek, Time Magazine, and on several documentaries for his work in the cannabis legal industry.

 

Labor: Medical Marijuana Law Comes to Illinois

ILLINOIS: Gov. Patrick Quinn signed into effect Illinois’ version of state laws allowing the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes. Entitled the “Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act,” Illinois now joins almost two dozen other states who allow marijuana use for medicinal purposes. [Read more…]

Labor: Medical Marijuana Law Comes to Illinois

ILLINOIS: Gov. Patrick Quinn signed into effect Illinois’ version of state laws allowing the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes. Entitled the “Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act,” Illinois now joins almost two dozen other states who allow marijuana use for medicinal purposes. [Read more…]