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Congressional Cannabis Caucus Co-Chairs Blumenauer, Lee Release Year-End Progress Memorandum, Outline Goals for 2022

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  Congressional Cannabis Caucus Co-Chairs Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) and Barbara Lee (D-CA) today released a year-end progress memorandum that includes steps taken by Congress throughout 2021 in the cannabis space. Co-Chairs Blumenauer and Lee also detail their top priorities for 2022, including federal descheduling, sentencing reform, industry equity, and research. 

“The table is set and the time is right for comprehensive cannabis reform, which will make a huge difference for people around the country,” said Co-Chair Blumenauer. “This year, we’ve advanced the MORE Act closer to the finish line, passed the SAFE Banking Act, and made progress in terms of research. Most importantly, we’ve watched this issue gain more momentum than ever with the American people—almost 70 percent of whom, including a majority of Republicans, want to see federal reform. Let’s get it done.”

“It’s time for the federal government to catch up to the rest of the country and start leading on cannabis reform,” said Co-Chair Lee. “The solutions for comprehensive reform are there, and this year we made progress. We’ve passed the MORE Act in the House, the SAFE Banking Act, and several Appropriations provisions. It’s far past time Congress move to finally get this across the finish line. Ending the war on drugs is an issue of racial equity and a moral imperative. I look forward to continuing my work with Cannabis Caucus Co-Chair Rep. Blumenauer to make strides toward comprehensive reform in the new year.

The memorandum is available here.

Congressman Don Young to President Biden and Vice President Harris: Keep Your Promise, Engage on Cannabis Reform

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  Congressman Don Young (R-AK) and Congressman Dave Joyce (R-OH), Co-Chairs of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus, sent a letter to President Joseph R. Biden and Vice President Kamala D. Harris, urging them to remove cannabis as a Schedule I substance and to engage in legislative efforts to reform federal cannabis policies. Click here for the full letter. 

Under current law, cannabis is classified as Schedule I substance alongside significantly more dangerous substances such as Heroin and LSD, and above far more dangerous drugs such as morphine, methadone and cocaine in the Schedule II category. This classification prevents cannabis from being accepted for medical use, causing research restrictions and preventing patients, including veterans, from accessing it.

Excerpts from the letter:

“Dear President Biden and Vice President Harris,

As Co-Chairs of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus, we once again urge you to reschedule cannabis under the Federal Controlled Substances Act.

Currently, cannabis is classified as a Schedule I substance, alongside significantly more dangerous substances such as Heroin and LSD, and above far more dangerous drugs such as morphine, methadone and cocaine in the Schedule II category. As a Schedule I substance, cannabis is not accepted for medical use on the federal level, which has caused significant research restrictions and continues to thwart the treatment of a wide range of patients, including those suffering from cancer as well as veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to those living with Multiple Sclerosis and seizure disorders. To be clear, we do not negate the benefit of traditional therapies, but question why the federal government continues to bar access to innovative, proven – and in many cases – safer alternatives.

As both legislative chambers continue to debate the merits of various common-sense proposals on the issue of cannabis reform and a complete end to federal prohibition garners more and more bipartisan support, your administration’s absence from these debates and lack of action on the topic is of serious concern.”

Read the full letter here.

Background:

  • Earlier this month, Congressman Don Young and his fellow Cannabis Caucus Co-Chairs David Joyce (R-OH), Barbara Lee (D-CA), and Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) sent a letter to Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary Denis McDonough, urging him to swiftly implement proposals to allow veterans to access medical cannabis. Click here for more.
  • On November 16th, Congressman Don Young helped introduce the States Reform Act with Congresswoman Nancy Mace (R-SC), Congressman Tom McClintock (R-CA), Congressman Peter Meijer (R-MI), and Congressman Brian Mast (R-FL). This legislation would protect state-legal cannabis policies by ending federal marijuana prohibition. Click here for more.
  • In May, Congressman Don Young helped Congressman Dave Joyce (R-OH) introduce the Common Sense Cannabis Reform for Veterans, Small Businesses and Medical Professionals Act. This bill ends federal marijuana prohibition by removing cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act. Click here for more.
  • In April, Congressman Don Young introduced the Gun Rights and Marijuana (GRAM) Act, legislation to secure the Second Amendment rights of Americans living in jurisdictions with legal adult-use and medicinal marijuana. Click here for more.

Congressional Cannabis Caucus Co-Chairs Blumenauer, Joyce, Lee and Young Urge VA to Offer Veterans Access to Lifesaving Cannabis Treatment

“…over twenty veterans continue to die by suicide each day—it is past time we stop barring access from these innovative therapies”

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  Congressional Cannabis Caucus Co-Chairs Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), David Joyce (R-OH), Barbara Lee (D-CA), and Don Young (R-AK) today urged the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to allow access to medical cannabis for VA patients as quickly as possible. 

The push comes amid growing frustration within the veteran community, which has been fighting for the change to help address opioid addiction and manage PTSD and other health issues, including multiple sclerosis (MS) and seizure disorders.

“Research has shown that cannabis can be safe and effective in targeted pain-management. Additionally, cannabis has proven benefits in managing PTSD and other health issues, including multiple sclerosis (MS) and seizure disorders.  Despite its efficacy, antiquated bureaucratic red-tape continues to deny veterans these life-altering treatments,” the lawmakers wrote in their letter to VA Secretary Denis McDonough. “Congress and several administrations have enacted various well-intentioned intervention attempts, however, over twenty veterans continue to die by suicide each day—it is past time we stop barring access from these innovative therapies. We therefore respectfully urge you to ensure no veteran can be denied medically prescribed cannabis treatments.”

“America’s veterans have risked life and limb to preserve our freedoms, so we must not allow the unnecessary politicization of medical cannabis to hinder their lifesaving therapies. We stand ready to work with you and your administration in advancing these necessary treatments,” they continued.

The lawmakers’ letter is available here and follows below.

Dear Secretary McDonough,

As bipartisan Co-Chairs of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus, we are pleased to learn the Department of Veterans Affairs is considering a change in policy to allow for access to medical cannabis for VA patients. We implore your agency to act swiftly.

As you know, between 11-20% of veterans who served in Operations Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Enduring Freedom (OEF) experience PTSD, 12% of Desert Storm servicemembers suffer from the disease, while 30% of Vietnam Veterans are estimated to be suffering as well.1

Further, according to research by Air Force Captain Carl Beyer at the University of California Davis Medical Center and the David Grant Air Force Medical Center at Travis Air Force Base, nearly 15% of those wounded in combat developed persistent opioid use, and a total of 6.7% went on to opioid abuse.23 A report within the U.S. National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health found “fifty percent of chronic non-cancer pain patients at the VHA received at least one opioid prescription each year between 2009 and 2011. Compared to the general U.S. population, VHA patients had nearly twice the rate of fatal accidental poisoning and opioid use disorder is seven times higher among VHA patients compared to private health plans. Greater risk of opioid use within the VHA than in the broader health system can be explained by the fact that VHA patients are more likely to suffer from chronic pain (50% or so) and more of its patients have psychiatric comorbidities”4

Given these staggering statistics, your agency has no time to waste in exploring alternative opioid and PTSD therapies.

Research has shown that cannabis can be safe and effective in targeted pain-management. Additionally, cannabis has proven benefits in managing PTSD and other health issues, including multiple sclerosis (MS) and seizure disorders.  Despite its efficacy, antiquated bureaucratic red-tape continues to deny veterans these life-altering treatments. Congress and several administrations have enacted various well-intentioned intervention attempts, however, over twenty veterans continue to die by suicide each day – it is past time we stop barring access from these innovative therapies. We therefore respectfully urge you to ensure no veteran can be denied medically prescribed cannabis treatments.

America’s veterans have risked life and limb to preserve our freedoms, so we must not allow the unnecessary politicization of medical cannabis to hinder their lifesaving therapies. We stand ready to work with you and your administration in advancing these necessary treatments.

Sincerely,

Ahead of Tomorrow’s D.C. Council Hearing on Recreational Marijuana Commercialization, Congresswoman Norton Says She is Closer Than Ever to Getting Rider Removed from D.C. Appropriations Bill

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  Ahead of the Council of the District of Columbia’s hearing tomorrow on legislation to commercialize recreational marijuana, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) said she is closer than ever to removing the rider from the D.C. Appropriations bill that prohibits the District from spending local funds on commercialization of recreational marijuana. Norton was successful in getting the rider removed from the pending House and Senate versions of the fiscal year (FY) 2022 D.C. Appropriations bill, though President Biden’s FY 22 budget proposed maintaining it. 

“Eighteen states have legalized recreational marijuana, and all have or will commercialize it,” Norton said. “D.C. should be able to collect tax revenue from all available sources, like every other jurisdiction, including from recreational marijuana, which is believed to be widely used in the District and throughout the country. The D.C. Council hearing on marijuana commercialization legislation tomorrow is timely, because my effort to remove the appropriations rider from the fiscal year 2022 D.C. Appropriations bill would allow D.C.’s local legislation legalizing commercialization to pass and take effect.

“I will always fight to remove each and every rider because D.C. should have full control over how it chooses to spend local funds. Anything less is unacceptable.”

In 2014, District voters approved an initiative legalizing the possession by adults of small amounts of marijuana for recreational use. Republicans immediately imposed a rider on the D.C. Appropriations bill to try to block the initiative from taking effect, but Norton successfully argued that the rider was flawed and only blocked D.C. from spending its local funds to commercialize recreational marijuana. As a result, D.C. residents have been able to possess up to two ounces of marijuana for recreational use, but not purchase it.

Congresswoman Norton Requests HUD Permit Marijuana in Public Housing

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) wrote Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Marcia Fudge today asking her to use executive discretion to not enforce rules against marijuana use in federally assisted housing in compliance with the marijuana laws of the state where the property is located.

“Individuals should not be denied admission to or fear eviction from federally assisted housing simply for treating their medical conditions or using a substance legal under state law,” Norton said. “Increasingly, Americans are changing their views on marijuana. Marijuana is legal in 36 states and the District of Columbia, and nobody should fear being thrown out of their home for using a product legalized by their state.”

Norton is the sponsor of the Marijuana in Federally Assisted Housing Parity Act of 2021, which would permit the use of marijuana in federally assisted housing in compliance with the marijuana laws of the state where the property is located.

The letter follows:

 

May 25, 2021

The Honorable Marcia Fudge

Secretary

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

451 Seventh Street SW

Washington, DC 20410

Dear Secretary Fudge:

I request that you use executive discretion to not enforce rules against marijuana use and possession in federally assisted housing, including public housing and Section 8 housing, in compliance with the marijuana laws of the state where the property is located.

Individuals living in federally assisted housing should not be denied admission, or face eviction, for using a legal product.  Adult use and/or medical marijuana is currently legal in 36 states and the District of Columbia, and over 90 percent of Americans support legalized medical marijuana.  The users of drugs that are illegal under federal law, including marijuana, are prohibited from being admitted into federally assisted housing.  Moreover, federal law allows landlords to evict residents of federally assisted housing for drug use.

The federal government has begun to change its approach to marijuana.  In 2018, the Food and Drug Administration approved Epidiolex, which is derived from marijuana.  Epidiolex is used to treat children who suffer from seizures.  For the last several years, Congress has prohibited the Department of Justice (DOJ) from using federal funds to prohibit jurisdictions from implementing their medical marijuana laws.  HUD, like DOJ, should not enforce federal marijuana laws where states have taken action to legalize marijuana.

Smoking marijuana in federally assisted housing should be treated in the same manner as smoking tobacco in federally assisted housing.

I ask that you respond in writing by June 21, 2021.

Sincerely,

Eleanor Holmes Norton

Congressman Blumenauer Lauds House Passage of Federal Legislation to Give Cannabis Businesses Access to Banking Services

Under SAFE Banking Act, cannabis businesses would not have to operate in cash, which has made Portland-area stores and workers a target for violent robberies.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: On April 19th, 2021 the U.S. House of Representatives passed federal legislation to provide legitimate cannabis businesses access to banking services, an issue that has long been championed by U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), founder and co-chair of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus. The bipartisan passage of the Secure And Fair Enforcement (SAFE) Banking Act in the 117th Congress comes as Portland-area cannabis businesses and their workers continue to be targeted with violent robberies that have been linked to a system that forces cannabis businesses to deal almost exclusively in cash.

“Cannabis will soon be a $20 billion industry and is overwhelmingly supported by the American public. The insane prohibition on banking services serves no one’s interest, except for money launderers, tax evaders, or those who are going to rob these cash-rich businesses,” Blumenauer said. “As we continue to push forward with full legalization, addressing this irrational, unfair, and unsafe denial of banking services to state-legal cannabis businesses is a top priority. This is a critical element of reform that can’t wait, and I urge our cannabis champions in the Senate to take up this legislation as soon as possible.”

Under the federal prohibition on cannabis, banks and credit unions are currently prohibited from serving cannabis businesses, even with financial products as simple as savings accounts or payroll checks. Notwithstanding the financial and practical hardships facing legal cannabis businesses, forcing these businesses to operate on a cash-only basis creates a public safety risk and makes tracking revenue more difficult for tax purposes.

The cash-only nature of cannabis businesses also makes them easy and frequent targets for robberies, which puts workers at risk. According to a March 2021 report by Willamette Week, in the preceding 10 months, Portland cannabis shops were robbed, burglarized, or looted 95 times – often at gunpoint – resulting in one tragic fatality.

The legislation passed in the House would prohibit federal regulators from taking punitive measures against depository institutions that provide banking services to legitimate cannabis-related businesses and ancillary businesses like the electricians, plumbers, and the landlords that serve them. The SAFE Banking Act also requires a GAO study and annual regulator reports to Congress to ensure equal access to credit and to reduce barriers to marketplace entry for potential and existing minority- and women-owned cannabis-related businesses.

Full text of the SAFE Banking Act can be found here.

Congressman Don Young Introduces Legislation to Protect Second Amendment Rights and Personal Liberty

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: Alaska Congressman Don Young, Co-Chair of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus, has introduced the Gun Rights And Marijuana (GRAM) Act, legislation to secure the Second Amendment rights of Americans living in jurisdictions with legal adult-use and medicinal marijuana. Congressmen Brian Mast (FL-18) and Rodney Davis (IL-13) have joined Congressman Young as original cosponsors of this legislation.

Under current law, an individual using recreational or medicinal marijuana in legal jurisdictions can be disqualified from exercising their Second Amendment rights. When attempting to purchase a firearm, individuals must fill out U.S. Department of Justice Form 4473. Question 21 (e) requires the individual to attest that they are “not an unlawful user of, or addicted to, marijuana or any depressant, stimulant, narcotic drug, or any other controlled substance.” The form clarifies that “The use or possession of marijuana remains unlawful under Federal law regardless of whether it has been legalized or decriminalized,” potentially disqualifying individuals who use state-legal marijuana from gun ownership, or forcing them to risk perjuring themselves.

The GRAM Act provides a simple exemption for those who use marijuana in states or on tribal land where it is otherwise legal. Alaska legalized adult-use cannabis in 2014, and the overwhelming majority of Americans now live in a state with some level of legal use, yet Federal prohibition means their fundamental rights may be revoked. No law-abiding citizen’s Constitutional rights should be threatened by outdated federal policy. The GRAM Act not only protects Second Amendment rights, but also defends a state’s Tenth Amendment right to set their own cannabis policy.

“When I was sworn into Congress, I took an oath to defend the Constitution of the United States. That oath does not mean picking and choosing which Amendments to defend; it requires us as Members of Congress to protect the ENTIRE Bill of Rights. I am very proud to introduce the GRAM Act, which takes a critical step to protect our Constitution and secure individual liberty. There are two main pillars that make this legislation important. First, it protects the Second Amendment for individuals seeking to exercise their Constitutional rights. It also defends the Tenth Amendment right of states to determine their own cannabis laws, as Alaska did in 2014,“said Congressman Don Young.

“Gun ownership is a significant part of Alaska’s culture and lifestyle. When my constituents chose to legalize adult-use marijuana, they were not surrendering their Second Amendment rights. At a time when more individuals have been purchasing firearms for self-defense, sportsmanship, hunting, and countless other reasons, we have experienced a surge in state-level cannabis reforms. While we make progress in some areas, it is vital that we do not roll back progress in others. Throughout my career, many pundits and talking heads have described me as one of the most unique Members of Congress, to put it politely. As both Co-Chair of the Cannabis Caucus and a board member of the National Rifle Association, in addition to the fact that I represent a state with legal cannabis, I believe this fight was tailor-made for my experience. The federal government has no business unduly restricting responsible citizens from exercising their rights or restricting states from listening to their constituents and reforming marijuana laws. The GRAM Act bridges this gap. Given that it deals with both gun and marijuana rights, there really is something for those on both sides of the aisle to support. I want to thank my friends, Congressmen Mast and Davis, for their partnership on behalf of our Constitution, states’ rights, and individual liberty. I call on my colleagues in both parties to join us in this important effort.”

“It should be up to individual states to determine their own marijuana laws, not the federal government.  The Constitution says nothing about marijuana but the Second Amendment clearly outlines every American’s right to bear arms,” Congressman Mast said. “This legislation makes it so individuals who use marijuana in a State that permits legal adult-use are still able to purchase firearms.”

“State-legal marijuana use should not be used as a pretext to bar individuals from purchasing or possessing firearms, which is a clear and well-defined Constitutional right,” said Congressman Davis. “I’ve long believed that laws regulating the production and use of marijuana should be left to the states, not the federal government. With more and more states legalizing marijuana each year, we have to make sure that we are protecting the Second Amendment rights of Americans who reside in those states and use marijuana legally based on their state’s laws. I’m proud to introduce this bill with Congressman Young and look forward to working with him to move it through Congress.”

Congressman Joyce Leads Bipartisan Effort to Allow VA Doctors to Recommend Medical Cannabis to Veterans

Joins Rep. Lee, Senator Schatz in introducing Veterans Medical Marijuana Safe Harbor Act of 2021

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: Congressman Dave Joyce (OH-14) joined his fellow Co-Chair of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus, Congresswoman Barbara Lee (CA-13) in introducing the Veterans Medical Marijuana Safe Harbor Act of 2021. Senator Brian Schatz (HI) has introduced the bill in the Senate.

This bipartisan, bicameral legislation would allow doctors at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to discuss, recommend and prescribe medical marijuana to veterans in states that have established medical marijuana programs. Currently, VA doctors are prohibited from doing so as the federal government classifies cannabis as a Schedule I substance. According to a 2017 American Legion survey more than 90% of veteran households support marijuana research and 82% want to see medical cannabis designated as a federally legal treatment option.

“There is a growing body of evidence about the beneficial uses of medical cannabis as treatment for PTSD and chronic pain, two terrible conditions that plague many of our veterans,” said Joyce. “If a state has made it legal, like Ohio has, the federal government should not be preventing a VA doctor from recommending medical cannabis if they believe that treatment is right for their patient. As the son of a World War II veteran who was wounded on the battlefield, I’ve seen firsthand the many challenges our nation’s heroes face when they return home. I’m proud to join my colleagues in introducing this important bill and will continue to do everything in my power to ensure we are providing our veterans with the care they need to overcome the wounds of war.”

The legislation would also create a temporary, five-year safe harbor protection for veterans who use medical marijuana and their doctors. Additionally, the bill would direct the VA to research the effects of medical marijuana on veterans in pain, as well as the relationship between medical marijuana programs and a potential reduction in opioid abuse among veterans.

In a recent study, researchers found that those who suffer from PTSD who used cannabis saw greater reductions in their PTSD symptoms and were 2.57 times more likely to recover from PTSD during the study than those who were not using cannabis. Furthermore, a 2016 study at the Minnesota Department of Health found that 58% of patients on other pain medications were able to reduce their use of those medications when they started taking medical cannabis. Of the patients taking opioid medications, more than 62% were able to reduce or eliminate opioid usage after 6 months.

According to the VA, nearly 20% of the 2.7 million Iraq and Afghanistan veterans will experience either PTSD or depression while more than 50% of older veterans receiving care at the VA are living with some form of chronic pain. Often times, people with PTSD experience depression, panic attacks, severe anxiety, or a substance use problem, putting them at a higher risk for suicide. Tragically, the VA’s most recent annual report shows that nearly 18 veterans take their own life every day.

Organizations that support this legislation include: Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA), VoteVets, Minority Veterans of America, Veterans Cannabis Coalition, Veterans Cannabis Project, National Cannabis Industry Association (NCIA), NORML, National Cannabis Roundtable, U.S. Pain Foundation, Drug Policy Alliance, Americans for Safe Access (ASA), Students for Sensible Drug Policy, Veteran’s Initiative 22, Arizona Dispensary Association, California Cannabis Industry Association, and Hawaii Cannabis Industry Association.

Congressman Boyle Introduces Bill to Remove Antiquated “Habitual Drunkard” Provision & Decriminalize Marijuana Offenses In Naturalization Process

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: Congressman Brendan F. Boyle (PA-02) introduced a bill to amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to strike out the “habitual drunkard” provision and remove marijuana offenses as grounds of inadmissibility or consideration in a good moral character determination. This commonsense bill will modernize the naturalization process and ensure marijuana related offenses do not negatively affect an applicant’s chance of becoming a prospective U.S. citizen.

“As applicants go through the Green Card and/or naturalization process, they currently encounter questions that ask, “Have you ever been a habitual drunkard?”, or for details about an applicant’s level of marijuana use”, said Boyle. “These questions are wholly unrelated to citizenship, and only serve to reinforce societal stigmas connected to alcohol and substance abuse. It is extremely troubling to see federal applications like this that continue to use a harsh and antiquated term such as “habitual drunkard”. Moreover, prospective citizens should not be penalized for relatively harmless and non-criminal offenses. This careless language only serves to reinforce societal stigmas and misunderstandings about substance abuse, and it is time we modernize the process.”

Boyle’s bill would amend the Immigration and Nationality Act by striking the “habitual drunkard” provision and exempt low-level marijuana related offenses as grounds for inadmissibility and/or deportation.

Congressman Blumenauer Reacts To New Report Detailing Vast Economic Benefits To MORE Act

CBO projections show that cannabis reform will lead to huge growth in revenue, cuts to federal prison spending, and more.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: Following a historic vote in the U.S. House of Representatives to end the federal prohibition on cannabis last week, the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office, or CBO, released a new report today detailing vast economic benefits to the legislation.

Among other things, the agency found that the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act would increase revenues by about $13.7 billion, cut federal prison spending by $1 billion, and reduce time served in federal prison among existing and future inmates by 73,000 person-years.

U.S. Rep. Blumenauer (D-OR), co-chair of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus and a key sponsor of the MORE Act, lauded these findings today on the House floor.

“It was sad that my Republican colleagues were unable to understand why we voted to reform our failed prohibition of cannabis. They don’t care about honoring the will of the people and they are unable to grasp the enormity of the racial injustice and damage by selective enforcement against young Black and Brown Americans,” Blumenauer said. “But the CBO score may have some other reasons for them. It shows that the MORE Act would reduce 73,000 person-years of prison time. It would increase revenues by $13.7 billion. It would provide $3 billion for job training and legal aid to people harmed by the war on drugs. While doing all of this, it would reduce the deficit by $7.344 billion.”

If the MORE Act becomes law, the CBO report also estimates that from 2021 – 2030, the U.S. Department of Justice would spend $3 billion from the MORE Act’s Opportunity Trust Fund to provide job training, legal aid, and other services to people harmed by the “War on Drugs.” During this same period, the legislation would lead to $2.7 billion in Small Business Association funding for state and local grants to make loans to cannabis businesses and help governments develop cannabis-licensing rules.

“Even if you don’t care about reducing the damage to Black and Brown Americans, or honoring the will of the people, the economics make it clear,” Blumenauer continued. “Once again, the people are right, and the people deserve strong Congressional support.”

The report released today by the CBO can be found here.

Full text of the MORE Act can be found here.