Search Results for: WASHINGTON TRIBES

Tribes, Washington State Open Door To Cooperate On Legal Marijuana

WASHINGTON:  There’s a process in place now for Indian tribes and the state of Washington to jointly regulate marijuana should any tribes choose to legalize and sell it.

Tribes don’t need a state’s permission to get into the pot business, but in Washington State both sides agreed it’s best to coordinate.

State Sen. Ann Rivers says she discovered some tribes are very interested and others not at all in growing or selling marijuana. Rivers stood beside Governor Jay Inslee Friday as he signed a bill allowing his office to enter into agreements with tribes about marijuana.

 

Squaxin, Suquamish Tribes Working On Plans To Sell Marijuana

WASHINGTON: A building nearing completion across the street from Little Creek Casino and Resort is a bet that marijuana will be the next booming business on Indian reservations.

If all goes as planned, the site between Shelton and Olympia will be a store where the Squaxin Island Tribe will sell the drug.

A hands-off federal policy on pot sales in Indian Country, announced in December by the Obama administration, has generated a lot of interest but few takers so far. Now at least two Washington tribes want to join the newly legal industry.

The Suquamish Tribe in northern Kitsap County could be the first, with the state Liquor and Cannabis Board due to vote on a proposed agreement Monday. The Squaxin could follow close behind. Both governments have been negotiating with Gov. Jay Inslee’s office to hammer out tribal compacts.

Tribal Marijuana Conference: ‘A 10-Year Window For Tribes To Capitalize’

WASHINGTON:  On Saturday, February 28 some 75 tribal leaders from across the country met to discuss forming the first “Tribal Cannabis Association” at the Tulalip Resort Casino on the Tulalip Reservation in Washington State.

This followed a packed day on February 27 of “Tribal Marijuana Conference” presentations and panels with speakers as diverse as former U.S. Attorney Troy Eid, present chair of President Barack Obama’s National Indian Law and Order Commission, to the city attorneys of both Seattle and Boulder, Colorado who gave in-depth overviews of how implementation is proceeding in their respective cities of state laws legalizing marijuana possession and usage.

Tribes From Around US Gather To Discuss Legal Marijuana

WASHINGTON:  The Justice Department’s announcement in December that it would allow the nation’s Indian tribes to legalize and regulate marijuana on their reservations brought notes of caution — if not silence or opposition — from many tribes.

They were reluctant given the substance-abuse problems that already plague many reservations.

But the attendance at a conference on the topic Friday gave an early indication of just how many might be weighing it, even if a thicket of potential legal issues remain.

Representatives of about 75 tribes from around the country converged on the Tulalip Indian Tribes’ resort and casino for a $605-a-head seminar on the regulatory, legal and social issues related to pot legalization.

Lawmakers Want To Work With Tribes On Regulations For Legal Pot

WASHINGTON:  Now that tribes can legalize marijuana on their reservations, some lawmakers want to allow the state to set up agreements with tribes to address potential issues, such as law enforcement and ways licensed marijuana businesses could operate across reservation borders.

A bill with bipartisan support would give the governor the authority to negotiate legal agreements, known as compacts, similar to those now used for gambling and gasoline taxes.

While some tribes are eager to legalize marijuana and perhaps pursue it as an economic opportunity, others, including the Yakama Nation, remain strongly opposed to the drug. 

After the state legalized marijuana, the Yakama Nation announced that it would not allow possession, sale or production on the Yakamas’ 1.2 million-acre reservation.

 

American Indian Tribes To Discuss Legal Pot At Conference

WASHINGTON:  American Indian tribes wrestling with whether to legalize marijuana have scheduled a national conference on the topic next month in Washington state.

Organizer Robert Odawi Porter, a tribal law expert and former president of Seneca Nation in New York, says there’s been a lot of discussion among tribes since the Justice Department announced in December that it would allow them to grow and sell marijuana.

A few tribes have expressed interest in the legal pot business. But for many, concerns about substance abuse are paramount. Porter says the conference will explore the legal, business, social and cultural questions facing tribes when it comes to marijuana.

The Feb. 27 event at the Tulalip Resort Casino is being co-sponsored by Seattle attorneys Hilary Bricken and Robert McVay, who have hosted other conferences on legal pot.

Indian Tribes Get OK To Grow And Sell Pot

OREGON: Indian tribes can grow and sell marijuana on their lands — even in states that ban the practice — as long as they follow the same federal conditions laid out for states that have legalized the drug, the U.S. Justice Department said Thursday.

Some advocates said the announcement could open new markets across the country and give rise to a rich new business on reservations, not unlike the advent of casino gambling. Others said it was too early to tell; many tribes oppose legalization, and only a handful of tribes have expressed any interest in the marijuana business.

As Washington state moved forward with legalization last year, the Yakama Nation took a strong stand against marijuana, insisting that it remain banned on the tribe’s 1.2 million-acre reservation and that violators face federal prosecution.

Tribes Can Legalize Pot, Justice Department Decides

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  Four western U.S. states have decided to allow recreational marijuana sales, but legal pot may soon be within driving distance of many more Americans following a new Department of Justice decision.

In a memo released Thursday, the department outlined new policies allowing American Indian tribes to grow and sell marijuana on reservation lands.

Possession of marijuana is a federal crime, but the department announced in August 2013 it would allow states to regulate recreational marijuana sales. The nation’s first recreational pot stores opened in Colorado and Washington this year.

The new federal policy will allow tribes interested in growing and selling marijuana to do so, if they maintain “robust and effective regulatory systems,” John Walsh, the U.S. attorney for Colorado, told the Los Angeles Times.

 

 

Legalized Pot Is A Mess Of Trouble For Tribes

WASHINGTON:  While a patchwork of state laws have given marijuana quasi-legal status in 24 states, status on many tribal lands remains prohibited, or at best uncertain. Many tribes are content to adhere to federal prohibitions, but in PL 83-280 states (notably Washington, with legal recreational use), some are considering or even embracing the economic development potential of growing and distributing marijuana.

In general, medical marijuana laws have not been recognized on tribal lands, with some tribal members even facing exile for using state-licensed cannabis on their reservations. Many non-tribal members have also been cited for possession on the reservation, and although some legal experts hold that jurisdiction is unclear, the Salt River Maricopa-Pima Indian Community has successfully defended impounding cars of card-holding medical marijuana patients. Other tribes have requested their state’s licensing authority not to permit dispensaries near reservation boundaries.

Tribes in most states—including Colorado, where recreational use is also legal—follow federal law on marijuana use, possession, production and distribution. While some at the Ute Mountain Ute reservation have recommended initiating community discussion on the topic, the Southern Ute have come out very strongly against adhering to Colorado’s recreational marijuana laws.

The fact of the matter is that tribes have experienced more harm than good by illegal growing, cartel activity, and children being endangered by adult use or being recruited into gangs. Other tribal leaders cite problems with allowing marijuana in Indian Country such as losing subsidies for low income housing and BIA funding; IHS and tribal health services capacity strained by already high rates of drug and alcohol abuse; adding a burden to tribal law enforcement departments, courts and other agencies; and loss of employment due to failing drug tests. This last could spell big problems for recruiting and retaining a number of public trust positions, such as firefighters and police officers.

 

 

 

 

Northwest Tribes Oppose Marijuana Legalization

WASHINGTON:  An organization representing 57 Northwest Indian tribes has announced its opposition to marijuana legalization, specifically in Alaska and Oregon.

The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians announced a partnership Tuesday with the Smart Approaches to Marijuana project, which supports a treatment, health-first marijuana policy.

The tribal group says it supports efforts to reduce marijuana use, especially among young people.

The group represents tribes in Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Nevada, Alaska and Northern California.