Search Results for: Santee Sioux tribe

USDA Approves Hemp Production Plans For Maine, Missouri, The Cow Creek Band Of Umpqua Tribe Of Indians

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has announced the approval of hemp production plans under the U.S. Domestic Hemp Production Program for Maine, Missouri and the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians, bringing the total number of approved plans to 58.

USDA continues to receive and review hemp production plans from states and Indian tribes. To review approved plans or check the status of a plan, visit the Status of State and Tribal Hemp Production Plans webpage.

State and tribal plans previously approved include:

States Tribes
Delaware Blackfeet Nation
Florida Cayuga Nation
Georgia Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes
Iowa Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe
Kansas Chippewa Cree Tribe
Louisiana Colorado River Indian Tribes
Maryland Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs
Massachusetts Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe
Minnesota Fort Belknap Indian Community
Montana Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska
Nebraska Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians
New Jersey La Jolla Band of Luiseno Indian Tribes
Ohio Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians
Pennsylvania Lower Sioux Indian Community
South Carolina Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida
Tennessee Oglala Sioux Tribe
Texas Otoe-Missouria Tribe
Washington Pala Band of Mission Indians
West Virginia Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma
Wyoming Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation
Puerto Rico Pueblo of Picuris Tribe
U.S. Virgin Islands Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians
Rosebud Sioux Tribe
Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa
Santa Rosa Cahuilla Indian Tribe
Santee Sioux Nation
Seneca Nation of Indians
Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribe
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe
Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians
Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska
Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo
Yurok Tribe

The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (2018 Farm Bill) directed USDA to develop a regulatory oversight program for hemp and include provisions for USDA to approve hemp production plans submitted by states and Indian tribes. Accordingly, on Oct. 31, 2019, USDA issued an interim final rule establishing the U.S. Domestic Hemp Production Program and the provisions for USDA to approve submitted plans. State and tribal plans provide details on practices and procedures that enable hemp producers in their jurisdictions to operate according to their individual plans and in compliance with federal laws.

For additional information about the program, visit the U.S. Domestic Hemp Production Program webpage.

Flandreau Sioux Put Marijuana Resort On Hold

SOUTH DAKOTA: The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe is temporarily suspending its marijuana cultivation and distributing facilities and is destroying its existing crop as leaders seek clarification on regulations from the federal government, according to the tribe’s lawyer.

Seth Pearman said the suspension is pivotal to the continued success of the marijuana venture and that tribal leadership is confident that after getting clarification from theU.S. Department of Justice, “it will be better suited to succeed.”

“The tribe will continue to consult with the federal and state government and hopes to be granted parity with states that have legalized marijuana,” Pearman said in the news release.

 

South Dakota Tribe To Open Nation’s First Marijuana Resort

SOUTH DAKOTA:  The Santee Sioux tribe has proven its business acumen, running a casino, a 120-room hotel and a 240-head buffalo ranch on the plains of South Dakota.

Now the small tribe of 400 is undertaking a new venture — opening the nation’s first marijuana resort on its reservation.

The experiment could offer a money-making model for other tribes seeking economic opportunities beyond casinos.

Santee Sioux leaders plan to grow the pot and sell it in a smoking lounge that includes a nightclub, arcade games, bar and food service and, eventually, slot machines and an outdoor music venue.

“We want it to be an adult playground,” said tribal President Anthony Reider. “There’s nowhere else in American that has something like this.”

Why American Indian Tribes Are Getting Into the Marijuana Business

SOUTH DAKOTA:  This New Year’s Eve, Tony Reider wants to throw a party unlike any his South Dakota tribe has seen.

There will be live music, food, outdoor games—and, floating over the revelry, a haze of marijuana smoke, from a first-of-its-kind pot lounge that is set to open by the end of the year, said Reider, the tribal president of the Flandreau Santee Sioux in Flandreau, S.D.

That pot lounge—modeled on an Amsterdam coffee shop, where customers would be able to buy and smoke up to 2 grams of marijuana a day—would be illegal anywhere else in South Dakota, which, like most U.S. states, bans the sale, possession and public smoking of pot.

South Dakota Indian Tribe Signs Deal With Colorado Company To Grow Pot

SOUTH DAKOTA:  An Indian tribe in South Dakota that plans to start selling marijuana for recreational and medicinal purposes has chosen a Colorado-based company to grow and distribute the drug on the reservation.

The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe on Wednesday signed a contract with Monarch America, Inc. The company will be responsible for designing the single, indoor site where the drug will be cultivated and sold.

The tribe earlier this month legalized the growth of marijuana on the reservation’s land. Tribal leaders hope to begin selling the drug by Jan. 1.

 

Tribe’s OK Of Marijuana Brings South Dakota AG Warning

SOUTH DAKOTA:  The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe in eastern South Dakota plans to sell marijuana by Jan. 1; but that prompts a warning from the SD attorney general that tribal laws won’t protect non-Native Americans, nor anyone off tribal land.

The Santee Sioux will grow marijuana at one site; hopefully earning a monthly profit of $2 million according to an Associated Press story.

In a news release, South Dakota Attorney General Marty Jackley stated that while he respects each tribe’s authority to pass laws, people also have to recognize South Dakota’s laws prohibiting “physical possession, distribution, and manufacture of marijuana by all non-Indian persons anywhere in South Dakota including within Indian Country; and all Indian persons outside of Indian Country.”

Flandreau Tribe Votes To Legalize Marijuana

SOUTH DAKOTA:  A South Dakota tribe has voted to grow and sell marijuana as soon as Fall 2015.

The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe executive committee voted 5-1 Thursday to legalize the growing and use of marijuana on tribal land. Trustee Roxee Johnson was the sole opposition to the ordinance.

The marijuana control ordinance will establish a facility where marijuana will be grown. Another location will offer marijuana for recreational use.

The ordinance approves marijuana consumption only inside of a single facility that has yet to be determined. Officials describe the proposed facility to function similarly to a bar. Tribe officials said that marijuana will not be allowed to leave that location.

 

USDA Approves Hemp Production Plans For Indiana, Michigan, New Mexico And South Dakota

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced the approval of hemp production plans under the U.S. Domestic Hemp Production Program for Indiana, Michigan, New Mexico and South Dakota, bringing the total number of approved plans to 69.

USDA continues to receive and review hemp production plans from states and Indian tribes. To review approved plans or check the status of a plan, visit the Status of State and Tribal Hemp Production Plans webpage.

State and tribal plans previously approved include:

States Tribes
Delaware Blackfeet Nation
Florida Cayuga Nation
Georgia Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes
Illinois Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe
Iowa Chippewa Cree Tribe
Kansas Colorado River Indian Tribes
Louisiana Comanche Nation
Maine Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs
Maryland Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians
Massachusetts Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe
Minnesota Fort Belknap Indian Community
Missouri Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska
Montana Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians
Nebraska La Jolla Band of Luiseno Indian Tribes
New Jersey Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians
Ohio Lower Sioux Indian Community
Oklahoma Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida
Pennsylvania Oglala Sioux Tribe
South Carolina Otoe-Missouria Tribe
Tennessee Pala Band of Mission Indians
Texas Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma
Utah Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation
Washington Pueblo of Picuris Tribe
West Virginia Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians
Wyoming Rosebud Sioux Tribe
Puerto Rico Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa
U.S. Virgin Islands San Carlos Apache Tribe of Arizona
Santa Rosa Cahuilla Indian Tribe
Santee Sioux Nation
Seminole Nation of Oklahoma
Seneca Nation of Indians
Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribe
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe
Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indians
Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians
Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska
Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo
Yurok Tribe

The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (2018 Farm Bill) directed USDA to develop a regulatory oversight program for hemp and include provisions for USDA to approve hemp production plans submitted by states and Indian tribes. Accordingly, on Oct. 31, 2019, USDA issued an interim final rule establishing the U.S. Domestic Hemp Production Program and the provisions for USDA to approve submitted plans. State and tribal plans provide details on practices and procedures that enable hemp producers in their jurisdictions to operate according to their individual plans and in compliance with federal laws.

For additional information about the program, visit the U.S. Domestic Hemp Production Program webpage.

‘Marijuana Resort’ Budding In South Dakota, Set To Open By Year’s End

SOUTH DAKOTA: The marijuana plants are already growing in a remodeled building on the Flandreau Santee Sioux reservation as the southeast South Dakota tribe shoots for a New Year’s Eve opening for its first-of-its-kind resort.

The state-of-the-art marijuana growing operation with its 65 strains of plants is in its infancy as finishing touches are being put on the building where it will take about 14 weeks to grow about 80 pounds of pot. That’s how much the tribe hopes to sell weekly at its smoking lounge and entertainment resort just south of their casino that is noting its 25th year of operation this month.

The resort has been about a year in the making, as the tribal council which leads the tribe of 280 adults and 110 children on the reservation voted 5-1 late last year to pursue the resort idea.

Interest in the operation has certainly been high, and president Tony Reider said other tribes across the nation are closely watching, as it will be the first-ever marijuana resort on a reservation.