Search Results for: Farm Bill of 2018

USDA Hosts Webinar On The Domestic Hemp Production Program & 2018 Farm Bill

Screenshot 2019-03-07 09.48.10DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: The USDA will host a free webinar explaining the 2018 Farm Bill and The Domestic Hemp Production Program.

Event Date: Wednesday, March 13, 2019 – 12:00pm to 3:00pm

The Specialty Crops Program is conducting a webinar to solicit public comments on the sections of the 2018 USDA Farm Bill relative to multiple sections dealing with industrial hemp. Up to 1,000 people at a time may view the webinar; however, time constraints will allow only 60 speakers during the webinar and it will not include a Question and Answer session. Speakers will have a maximum time limit of three minutes and must submit a written copy of their comments to farmbill.hemp@usda.gov by March 11, 2019.

To register: Visit https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_L2G9K7cXTkayQ2O1_0AP0g  After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

For questions regarding the listening session, please email Jeff Davis or view the Federal Register Notice

For additional information on the marketing program visit the Marketing Program for the Commercial Production of Hemp webpage.

House And Senate Ag Leaders: We’ve Reached Agreement In Principle On 2018 Farm Bill

MJLegal

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: House and Senate Agriculture Committee Chairmen Mike Conaway (R-Texas) and Pat Roberts (R- Kan.) and Ranking Members Collin Peterson (D-Minn.) and Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) made the following announcement today on the state of 2018 Farm Bill negotiations:

“We’re pleased to announce that we’ve reached an agreement in principle on the 2018 Farm Bill. We are working to finalize legal and report language as well as CBO scores, but we still have more work to do. We are committed to delivering a new farm bill to America as quickly as possible.”

Oregon Governor Brown Signs Hemp Regulatory Bill

Testing of southern Oregon hemp farms starts this week

 

OREGON:  At a special commission meeting on July 19, 2021, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) approved temporary rules allowing the agency to work with the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) to begin field testing of hemp fields across Oregon; these tests are to determine if the grows are legitimate or illegal. The OLCC rules follow yesterday’s signature by Oregon Governor Kate Brown of House Bill 3000, which also establishes standards to prevent minors from purchasing intoxicating products derived from hemp. 

The OLCC temporary rules establish a limit on the level of THC (the intoxicating ingredient in marijuana) that can be in a hemp-derived product. In addition, it creates methods for testing hemp in the field to distinguish between true hemp and marijuana.

This week, starting in southern Oregon, OLCC and ODA will begin to inspect registered hemp grow sites equipped with THC field testing units. “Our objective through the remainder of the summer and into the fall is to make sure that every field gets these tests done,” said OLCC Executive Director Steve Marks.

There are four main components to HB 3000:

  • Regulating cannabis intoxicants
  • Curbing illegal production of cannabis
  • State program compliance with the 2018 Farm Bill
  • Establishing a task force to address the regulation and marketing of growing cannabis in Oregon

Under the new law, sales of adult-use cannabis items to minors are immediately prohibited. Previously a form of THC, Delta-8-THC, could be produced from hemp and used to make products with higher potency levels than marijuana. However, Delta-8-THC was being sold outside Oregon’s regulated market and could be found at neighborhood convenience stores, where children could buy it. In January of 2022, the OLCC, ODA, and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) will set new potency and concentration limits for THC and other cannabis intoxicants in hemp products intended for sale to adults.

The legislation requires establishing tracking requirements for cannabinoid hemp commodities and products intended for human consumption, similar to tracking cannabis products sold in the OLCC regulated recreational or adult-use market.

HB 3000 gives OLCC and ODA tools to target illicit production of hemp. Specifically around cannabis being illegally produced because it is unregistered or under the guise that it’s hemp. OLCC inspectors will support ODA’s staff, with law enforcement providing necessary protection and safety assessments to the joint inspection teams. Together the agencies will  inspect hemp grow sites to test the crop’s THC levels to determine compliance with Oregon’s Hemp Program and, if necessary, take enforcement action, which could include crop destruction.

The law amends Oregon’s hemp laws to align with state statues, 2018 Farm Bill requirements and the US Department of Agriculture’s final rules. Oregon will submit a State Plan to USDA demonstrating key compliance measures, including the authority for criminal records checks and allowing license denials based on a hemp registration applicant’s criminal record.

OLCC and ODA staff will brief southern Oregon elected officials on the inspection plans later this week as inspectors get ready to fan out across Jackson and Josephine counties. However, OLCC Executive Director Marks indicated that legitimate hemp farmers should have no concerns.

“We’re really not trying to define what hemp is here: we’re really trying to spot check and take a minimum amount of samples to figure out what is commercial marijuana,” said Marks. “This will enable ODA or law enforcement to stop the illegal production of marijuana disguised as hemp production.”

The OLCC temporary rules remain in effect until January 1, 2022, when additional other legislative requirements of HB 3000 go into effect.

Harris and Associates, LLC & Georgia Hemp Association Host 2021 Farmer’s Forum: Hemp Cultivation In Georgia

VIRTUAL SYMPOSIUM ON MARCH 10, 2021

STATE OFFICIALS INCLUDE REPRESENTATIVES ROBERT DICKEY, WINFRED DUKES, MICAH GRAVELY, HAROLD JONES AND BILLY MITCHELL

FREE EVENT TARGETS ASPIRING HEMP AND CANNABIS FARMERS,

GEORGIA: Harris and Associates LLC, hosts of 710 Georgia Compassion Day – the nation’s first cannabis education symposium held at a state capitol building – have partnered with Michael “Coach” Harris, the first hemp lobbyist in the state and CEO of the Georgia Hemp Association, and Georgia House Representatives Robert Dickey (R-Musella), Winfred Dukes (D-Albany), Micha Gravely (R-Douglasville), Democratic Whip Harold Jones III (D-Augusta) and Billy Mitchell (D-Stone Mountain), for 2021 Farmers Forum:  Hemp Cultivation in Georgia, a  FREE online event on March 10, 2021, at 1:00 pm to explore opportunities within legal cannabis and hemp for farming and careers in the Southeastern region.

The inaugural Farmer’s Forum took place in 2019 at the state capitol with elected officials who sponsored Georgia HB 213 and HB324. Following the symposium, Harris and Associates LLC continued to host additional workshops in the community, inviting speakers from across the Nation, such as David Schmitt of Hemp Inc University and Bill Billings, the nation’s first legal hemp grower. Adhering to state guidelines, this year’s event will be held virtually and with a new spin featuring live speakers and taped conversations. Industry leaders and elected officials will hear farmers’ needs, explore solutions, and network to build industry infrastructure.  Aiming to assist patients denied safe access, businesses that want to avoid criminalization, and address the responsibilities and financial impact on farmers,  this symposium will be a resource for those at the starting point.

This FREE virtual event will bring patients, farmers, business leaders, industry experts, and advocates together to discuss topics ranging from winning a license to creating products and reinvesting in communities.

“Georgia patients and farmers are seeking guidance to advance hemp as a viable crop, medicine, and commodity- this forum is a pathway to the solutions stakeholders seek,” said Alexis Harris, CEO of Harris and Associates LLC and member of the Georgia Hemp Association, NWIAA, and Peachtree Norml. “We are grateful to continue to lead this conversation with patients, stakeholders, and elected officials to determine what approach will truly work for Georgia and this plant at all levels. As patients, advocates, and entrepreneurs under the 2018 Farm Bill, we have  connected with leaders across all professions to educate, inform and connect stakeholders who can build the infrastructure necessary for a strong economic and social impact.”

Featured speakers include Representative Dukes, Bruce Perlowin, founder of Hemp Inc, Noreen S Whitehead NWIAA Georgia Chairwoman, and industry entrepreneurs including Amy Ansel, Ted Talk Seattle Hemp Biochemist speaker and advocate Dr. Charles Walker.

 Other topics to be discussed during the summit include:

  • Safe Access and Decriminalization

  • Pathways to start a cannabis business

  • Careers in cannabis creating CBD hemp products

  • Certificate programs in hemp and cannabis (college/continuing education programs/ CLE)

  • Understanding land use and opportunities

  • How industry actions can reinvest in our communities

Additional sponsors of the 2021 Farmer’s Forum: Hemp Cultivation in Georgia include National Women in Agriculture, Troops Farms, Indigenous Hemp Education Association (IHEA), Legacy Farms, and  Status Network.

To register for this free event, visit 2021 Farmer’s Forum: Hemp Cultivation in Georgia

California Bureau Of Cannabis Control Issues Notice Regarding Billboard Advertisements On Interstate And State Highways

CALIFORNIA:  On January 11, 2021, in the case of Farmer v. Bureau of Cannabis Control (Bureau) & Lori Ajax, the San Luis Obispo County Superior Court entered a formal judgement ruling that Section 5040(b)(3) of the Bureau’s regulations is invalid.

 

 

This means that Section 5040(b)(3), which only prohibited billboard advertising within a 15-mile radius of the California border on an interstate or state highway that crosses the California border, is no longer in effect. Therefore, a licensee may not place advertising or marketing on a billboard, or similar advertising device, anywhere on an interstate or state highway that crosses the California border, as indicated in Business and Professions Code section 26152(d).

To comply with the law and regulations, licensees may not place new advertising or marketing on any interstate highway or state highway that crosses the California border. Licensees should also begin the process of removing current advertising and marketing that meets this criteria.
Licensees that have questions regarding complying with court’s ruling may send them to BCC@DCA.CA.GOV.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard’s Defense Bill Amendment Removes DOD CBD/Hemp Prohibition

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02), a senior member of the House Armed Services Committee, secured an amendment to the annual national defense bill that would ensure that the U.S. Department of Defense may not prohibit the possession, use, or consumption of hemp products — in compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local law — by servicemembers. This would apply to hemp that meets the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946 definition (amended by the Agricultural Improvement Act of 2018). The Gabbard amendment was included in the final version of the bill which passed on Tuesday, 295-125, and now goes to the Senate for consideration.

“There is great research being done around hemp, resulting in new products coming to market that are proven to help with ailments like insomnia, inflammation, chronic pain, epilepsy, Traumatic Brain Injury, Post-Traumatic Stress and more. Hemp products provide a form of treatment that serves as an alternative option for those who would rather pursue natural remedies rather than prescription drugs. This amendment passed with strong bipartisan support, ensuring our servicemembers have access to the same over-the-counter products that Americans all across the country benefit from today,” said Rep. Tulsi Gabbard.

The 2018 Farm Bill, known as the Agricultural Improvement Act, legalized hemp, defined as cannabis (Cannabis sativa L.) and derivatives of cannabis with extremely low concentrations of the psychoactive compound delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) (no more than 0.3 percent THC on a dry weight basis). Currently, many over-the-counter products are sold that meet these parameters.

Farm Bill Provisions Lifting Federal Hemp Ban Become Law

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: President Donald Trump today signed legislation into law that includes language lifting the United States’ decades-long prohibition on domestic, commercial hemp production. The provisions were included within The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (aka ‘The Farm Bill’), which takes effect on January 1, 2019.

“The significance of this law change should not be underemphasized,” NORML Deputy Director Paul Armentano said. “This law marks the first change in the federal classification of the cannabis plant since it was initially classified as a schedule I controlled substance by Congress in 1970, and paves the way for the first federally-sanctioned commercial hemp grows since World War II.”

Language included in the 2014 version of the Farm Bill (Sec. 7606) permitted states to license farmers to cultivate hemp as part of a university-sanction pilot program, but did not allow for the commercialization of the crop.

The hemp-specific provisions of the 2018 Act amend the federal Controlled Substances Act of 1970 so that hemp plants containing no more than 0.3 percent THC are no longer classified as a schedule I controlled substance under federal law.

The Act also broadens the definition of ‘hemp’ (Section 297A) to include “any part of the plant, including … extracts [or] cannabinoids” that do not possess greater than 0.3 percent THC on a dry weight basis. To date, various commercial products – such as some CBD oils – are advertised as being derived from hemp, although some experts in the field dispute the notion that such plants are an efficient source for cannabinoids.

The Act (Section 297B) permits those US states that wish to possess “primary regulatory authority over the production of hemp” to submit a plan to the US Secretary of Agriculture. The agency has 60 days to approve, disapprove, or amend the plan. In instances where a state-proposed plan is not approved, “it shall be unlawful to produce hemp in that state … without a license.” Federal grant opportunities will be available to licensed commercial farmers, as will the ability for farmers to obtain crop insurance. The Act does not federally recognize non-licensed, non-commercial hemp cultivation activities.

Nothing in the new language (Section 297D) shall “affect or modify” the existing regulatory powers of the US Food and Drug Administration or other agencies with regard to the enforcement of the US Food, Drugs, and Cosmetics Act or the Public Health Service Act. The FDA has previously acknowledged that it will “take action when we see the illegal marketing of CBD-containing products with unproven medical claims. We’re especially concerned when these products are marketed for serious or life-threatening diseases, where the illegal promotion of an unproven compound could discourage a patient from seeking other therapies that have proven benefits.”

NORML Political Director Justin Strekal said: “These changes represent a significant and long overdue shift in US policy. Nonetheless, future regulatory efforts will likely still be required to address emerging consumer issues when it comes to the commercial sale and marketing of certain hemp-derived products, particularly so-called hemp-derived CBD extracts. For years, many of the producers of these products have navigated in a grey area of the law — manufacturing products of variable and sometimes questionable quality and safety. Now it is time for lawmakers to craft consistent benchmark safety and quality standards for hemp-derived CBD in order to increase consumer satisfaction and confidence as this nascent industry transitions into a legal marketplace.”


For more information, contact Justin Strekal, NORML Political Director, at (202) 483-5500.

 

Integrated Cannabis Solutions To Purchase 200-Acre Farm In Wisconsin

FLORIDA: Integrated Cannabis Solutions  has agreed to purchase the 200 acre farm the test grow is being planted on, after a successful harvest of the 20 acres. The purchase of the farm will give Integrated a solid real estate Asset on the books.

The parties have agreed on a purchase price of $1,500,000 for the property that includes 3 sections of tillable land totaling 160 acres. The back history on the farm has proven both hemp and tobacco have been successfully planted on this farm. The soil is so rich in nutrients the crops require very little water. The farm has its own brook and water rights with pumping stations.

The test harvest will generate more than enough money to cover the cost of the purchase of the farm and fund the future operations on the farm. The initial harvest should yield $6-$8 million fully funding the farms next harvest of 160 acres and building a first class CBD lab.

The property already has a 3,000 square foot storage barn with a cement slab and an additional slab next to the barn to build another building, that will house a CBD lab to turn the plants into CBD Isolate.

The main issue farmers in Wisconsin have about growing hemp is the lack of places to process the crops in Wisconsin, this is why in 2018 far fewer people actually planted crops than were granted licenses.

On the additional 40 acres of land greenhouses will be built to house the seedlings for each planting, if timed right 2 plantings per year could be done, further increasing the revenue of the farm.

With the Farm Bill looking to be signed into law, Integrated Cannabis is positioned to be a leader in Wisconsin by having the ability to both store and process industrial hemp into CBD Isolate.

Integrated Cannabis has been reviewing other opportunities within the Cannabis sector and will begin to give further updates shortly.

Integrated Cannabis Solutions, in compliance with SEC regulations, may in the future use social media outlets like Facebook or Twitter and its own website to announce key information in compliance with Reg FD.

McConnell Signs Farm Bill Conference Report With Kentucky Hemp Pen

KENTUCKY:  U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) announced today that his language to legalize industrial hemp is officially included in the finalized Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (Farm Bill). The Farm Bill Conference Report takes serious steps to ensure the future of American agriculture, and it contains the legislation — championed by Majority Leader McConnell — that would empower farmers to begin cultivating industrial hemp, a crop that can play a key role in the economic future of Kentucky and the nation.

The Farm Bill Conference Report was signed by conferees last night, including Senator McConnell who signed it with a pen made from hemp grown in Kentucky. U.S. Representative James Comer (KY-01), another Farm Bill conferee and the sponsor of Senator McConnell’s hemp provision in the House of Representatives, also signed the Farm Bill Conference Report.

Senator McConnell’s measure legalizes hemp as an agricultural commodity by removing it from the federal list of controlled substances. It also gives states the opportunity to become the primary regulators of hemp production, allows hemp researchers to apply for competitive federal grants from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and makes hemp eligible for crop insurance. This measure builds upon the hemp pilot programs, which Senator McConnell secured in the 2014 Farm Bill.

“Last year alone, Kentucky hemp recorded more than $16 million in product sales through the state pilot program I previously secured, demonstrating that hemp holds great potential for the future of Kentucky agriculture,” said Senator McConnell. “My Hemp Farming Act as included in the Farm Bill will not only legalize domestic hemp, but it will also allow state departments of agriculture to be responsible for its oversight. In Kentucky, that means that Commissioner Ryan Quarles, another champion of hemp, will be able to help farmers thrive. When the Senate votes on this legislation in the coming days, we will also be voting to give farmers throughout the country the chance to tap into hemp’s potential and take part in its future.”

“When I was elected Commissioner of Agriculture, I promised to take Kentucky’s hemp program to the next level and establish our state as the epicenter of the industry in the United States,” said Commissioner of Agriculture Ryan Quarles. “This Farm Bill helps achieve that goal, and demonstrates that hemp is no longer a novelty but a serious crop that will unleash economic opportunity for our farmers. We would not be here today without the unwavering support of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and our congressional delegation.”

In collaboration with agriculture leaders in Kentucky and throughout the nation, Senator McConnell utilized his position as Senate Majority Leader to secure language in the 2014 Farm Bill to authorize hemp research pilot programs. He built on that success with federal legislation to ensure that hemp produced from the pilot programs could be transported, processed, and marketed. Under the guidance of Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Quarles and his predecessor, now-U.S. Representative Comer, these programs have allowed Kentucky farmers to both research the plant and to demonstrate its full potential.

“Without Senator McConnell’s leadership on the 2018 Farm Bill and the Hemp Language, it would not have gotten this far. I am grateful that the Majority Leader found this issue so important that he appointed himself as a Farm Bill conferee to ensure his bill to legalize hemp will become a reality. As a Kentucky hemp farmer and processor, it is very important to me that Congress passes this bill and sends it to the President’s desk,” said Brian Furnish, Director of Farming & Global Production at Ananda Hemp in Cynthiana, Kentucky.

“We appreciate Senator McConnell’s unwavering support and leadership on behalf of hemp in Congress. By securing hemp legalization in the Farm Bill, Kentuckians can feel confident in the future of hemp and fully embrace its potential as an agricultural crop. This will open a vast amount of new opportunities for farmers, processors, retailers, and entrepreneurs like us here in Kentucky and nationwide,” said Alyssa Erickson, Co-founder of Kentucky Hempsters.

The Farm Bill Conference Report is expected to be approved by the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives in the coming days; it will then be sent to President Donald Trump for his signature. In addition to the hemp measure, the Farm Bill strengthens the safety measures that directly help commodity producers as they confront low prices, volatile markets, and the constant threat of natural disasters. It also seizes on a number of opportunities to invest in the future of American agriculture and rural communities by expanding rural broadband, enhancing water infrastructure, and continuing the fight against the opioid epidemic that is devastating rural America.

According the 2017 processor production reports: Kentucky licensed processors paid Kentucky growers $7.5 million for harvested hemp. Additionally, Industrial Hemp Research Pilot Program processor licensees reported $25.6 million in capital improvements and investments and $16.7 million in gross product sales. In 2017, more than 3,200 acres of hemp were being grown across Kentucky.

Reconciled Farm Bill To Include Provisions Lifting Federal Hemp Ban

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  House and Senate lawmakers have agreed in principle to a reconciled version of H.R. 2: The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (aka the 2018 Farm Bill), which includes provisions lifting the federal prohibition of industrial hemp.

The hemp-specific provisions – which Senate Majority Speaker Mitch McConnell (R-KY) included in the Senate version of the bill, but were absent from the House version – amend federal regulations to further expand and facilitate state-licensed hemp production, research, and commerce. The language also for the first time amends the federal Controlled Substances Act of 1970 so that industrial hemp plants containing no more than 0.3 percent THC are no longer classified as a schedule I controlled substance. (See page 1182, Section 12608: ‘Conforming changes to controlled substances act.’) Certain cannabinoid compounds extracted from the hemp plant would also be exempt from the CSA.

House and Senate lawmakers still need to vote on the engrossed version of the Act, which they are expected to do later this month. Passage of the bill would allow state governments, rather than the federal governments, to be the primary regulators of hemp and hempen products.

Senator McConnell previously shepherded hemp-related language (Section 7606) in the 2014 version of the Farm Bill, permitting states to establish hemp research and cultivation programs absent federal approval. A majority of states have now enacted legislation to permit such programs.


For more information, contact Justin Strekal, NORML Political Director, at (202) 483-5500 or Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org.