Search Results for: APP STORE

App Store Denials: Apple Just Says No To Many Pot iPhone Apps

COLORADO:  On the same November day that saw more than 1 million people in Oregon, Alaska and Washington, D.C.,  vote to legalize recreational marijuana, a popular social media app rooted in the cannabis space was removed from Apple’s massive commercial marketplace known as the  App Store.

The App Store is one of the largest content distribution channels in the world, and we’d already been on there for 14 months,” said Isaac Dietrich, CEO of Denver-based social media outfit MassRoots. “After we were taken down from the App Store, I called Apple back on election day and the guy said they had amended the App Store policy on cannabis social apps.

“I told him, ‘You do know that Oregon, Alaska and D.C. are about to push legalization through.’ He said the executives in the App Store said this content isn’t the kind of content they want to see in the App Store.”

Apple told The Denver Post its policies on marijuana apps have not changed. Its  legal guideline 22.1 says, “Apps must comply with all legal requirements in any location where they are made available to users.”

CannaScore Wins Banking Appeal – Has Account Fully Restored

COLORADO: CannaScore announced it is has been successful in its appeal, and its banking privileges have been restored. As reported here on MJ News Network last month, the company had certain banking privileges revoked when its financial services provider discovered the company was providing services to the marijuana industry. During the appeal, the company offered its products free of charge.

“Although we have full banking access again, we are still giving all customers a free trial of our award-winning cloud-based software,” said Thomas Smith, Managing Partner.

The CannaScore system audits compliance with a wide range of regulations governing the cannabis industry, including licensing, security, personnel safety, food handling, pesticides, and chemical exposure.

Legal cannabis growers, producer/processors, and retailers can use the system to identify areas of non-compliance before problems occur, and provide assurance that they are adhering to the myriad of state and local regulations. Failure to comply with regulations can often result in fines, shutdowns, license revocation and even prison.

Additionally, banks, insurance firms, accountants and real estate developers can use CannaScore as a tool to ensure that their clients operating in the cannabis sector are in compliance as mandated in the Cole Memo and finCEN Guidance.

CannaScore is easy to use, and quickly analyzes compliance that exceeds state parameters. The system also produces a score, which is useful for anyone in the cannabis industry, including consumers, to quickly evaluate the quality of an organization.

“Companies that score high may be more likely to attract funding, obtain favorable rates, demonstrate reliability to landlords, and even attract new customers,” Smith said.

Florida Medical-Marijuana Applicants Foresee Stores, Door-To-Door Service

FLORIDA: Eight companies vying to become the first in Central Florida to produce medical marijuana are proposing a wide range of retail options, from one central dispensary with delivery services to more than a dozen retail stores.

The Florida Department of Health is reviewing applications to decide which one will be licensed for the Central Florida market. That region encompasses 18 counties and runs from Stuart to Daytona Beach on the Atlantic coast, through Metro Orlando to St. Petersburg to Inverness on the Gulf Coast.

The winning company will get the Central Florida franchise to produce medicines derived from cannabis that have shown promise treating people with epilepsy and other neurological disorders.

State officials have indicated they hope to award Florida’s five regional licenses later this year, and some applicants say they can have product available for sale within a couple of months of getting the license.

 

Vail Marijuana Store Ban Gets First Approval

COLORADO:  There aren’t any retail marijuana stores here now, and there won’t be any retail for the foreseeable future. The Vail Town Council on Tuesday voted 6-1 to give first-reading approval of a ban on retail marijuana stores, as well as cultivation facilities.

The ban, which will face a final-approval vote as soon as Aug. 4, replaces a temporary moratorium the town imposed in 2014. After a handful of extensions, council member Dave Chapin proposed a permanent ban at the council’s July 7 meeting.

In this case, though, “permanent” is a relative term. Chapin said Tuesday the council could overturn the current ordinance almost as soon as it’s passed. And Vail voters in November will elect at least two and as many as four new council members.

‘Uber For Pot’ Startup Canary Shuts Down, Merges With In-Store Weed Pickup App

WASHINGTON:  With new laws regulating the medical marijuana industry in Washington set to pass on Friday, pot entrepreneurs are re-thinking their business plans.

Canary, a Seattle-based startup that launched late last year and billed itself as the “Uber for pot,” shut down today.

Canary co-founder Josiah Tullis said that the new regulations will effectively prohibit the delivery of medical marijuana in Washington, which was the backbone of Canary’s revenue stream. Meanwhile, I-502, which governs the use of recreational marijuana in Washington, does not allow for delivery of pot.

“We could see it coming,” said Tullis, a junior at the University of Washington. “We were already re-examining which direction to take our product.”

 

WA Liquor Control Board Approves Lottery Process for Retail Marijuana Stores

WASHINGTON: The Washington State Liquor Control Board has approved staff’s recommendation for a lottery that will select the apparent successful applicants for marijuana retail licenses. The independent, double-blind process will take place April 21-25, 2014, and will produce an ordered list of applicants that the agency will use to continue its retail licensing process. The agency expects to begin issuing retail licenses no later than the first week of July.

Initiative 502 directed the WSLCB to limit the number of marijuana retail stores by county. In its rules, the WSLCB limited the number of stores statewide to 334. The most populated cities within each county are allotted a maximum number of stores with the remainder at large within the county. [Read more…]

Washington State Approves 334 Retail Pot Stores; 61 in King County

WASHINGTON: Revised state rules for a recreational marijuana system include the location of 334 retail pot stores, an overall cap on pot production and limits on concentrated ownership of pot stores, growing and processing facilities. [Read more…]

Washington State Approves 334 Retail Pot Stores; 61 in King County

WASHINGTON: Revised state rules for a recreational marijuana system include the location of 334 retail pot stores, an overall cap on pot production and limits on concentrated ownership of pot stores, growing and processing facilities. [Read more…]