Seattle Hempfest & Fix Democracy First Team Up For Voter Registration Push

Hempfest

WASHINGTON: Nearly 10,000 Washingtonians have been registered to vote at Seattle Hempfest. This year the organization has teamed up with the non-profit Fix Democracy First! in an effort to increase voter registration at the event.

“Seattle Hempfest is the single biggest voter registration event in Washington State,” says Cindy Black, Fix Democracy First!’s executive Director.

Seattle Hempfest, a volunteer powered event, is asking for additional volunteers from the community to assist in the 3 day long voter registration drive.

“Voting remains one of your most significant forms of political speech, because it is an ultimate expression of your political opinion,” says Seattle Hempfest’s Vivian McPeak.  “It is as important today as it has ever been that Americans actively participate in elections. If you don’t vote you will have no voice in determining who your elected representatives are, and no say in how local issues and ballot initiatives will be decided,” McPeak continues.

Seattle Hempfest 2018 teams up with Fix Democracy First! for annual Hempfest voter registration push

Seattle Hempfest 2018 teams up with Fix Democracy First! for annual Hempfest voter registration push

As a U.S. citizen of any age over 18, you have a right to register and vote.  But in various parts of America barriers are set in the path of people trying to vote, including photo I.D. requirements, limits on early voting, voter registration restrictions, proof of citizenship requirements, voter roll purges, and engineering legislative district boundaries to favor candidates of a particular political party.  Add to that political campaigns filled with deceptions and propaganda, and it sometimes seems pointless to register and vote.

While there are some positive changes being made to Washington election laws, the outcome of the next several elections could dictate the direction our nation takes on a variety of critical issues.

“Voting remains one of your most significant forms of political speech, because it is an ultimate expression of your political opinion,” says Seattle Hempfest’s Vivian McPeak.  “It is as important today as it has ever been that Americans actively participate in elections. If you don’t vote you will have no voice in determining who your elected representatives are, and no say in how local issues and ballot initiatives will be decided,” McPeak continues.

If you are a U.S. citizen, at least 18 years old, currently not in prison/halfway house, or on parole/probation that requires you to report to a State of Washington parole/probation officer because of a felony conviction in a State of Washington Court, you have the right to vote. (What’s important here is, that you don’t have any reporting requirements.)  You are no longer required to have paid your State of Washington fines and other financial obligations in full, so long as a State of Washington Court hasn’t found that you are willfully refusing to pay them, and has barred you from voting.

If you meet those State of Washington requirements, you can now register and vote. If you were convicted of a felony in Federal Court, you have the right to vote when you are released from prison/halfway house, even if you have fines and other financial obligations (Federal Courts do not barr you from voting if you don’t pay your fines and other financial obligations), and are required to report to a Federal Probation Officer.

Read full article @ Seattle Hempfest

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