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Philly420: Teenagers Using Less Marijuana In Age Of Legalization

PENNSYLVANIA:  A new study published The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse has found that teens are using marijuana less frequently and are less attracted to it now that it is decriminalized or legalized at the state level.

The data challenges many assumptions about how changing cannabis laws may impact children.

Opponents of legalization often tout scientifically unsupported notions about teen marijuana use.

For example, here in Pennsylvania, representatives from the substance abuse treatment industry, the District Attorneys Association and Pa. Fraternal Order of Police spoke during House committee hearings against allowing marijuana for medical use, in part, because they fear youth use will somehow increase. But the truth is that teen use is declining and that young people may be finding far less allure when cannabis is regulated.

 

 

Jaw Dropping Benefits Of Smoking Marijuana

According to research by United Nations, more than 150 million people in the world use marijuana. That makes around 3% of the world’s population. However, that should not be surprising because this drug continues to get legalized by many states.

Although marijuana is always seen as a notorious drug, there is no escape from the fact that it has several medical benefits. Despite its harmful side effects as a result of over-consumption, the sales continue to boost every year, and the numbers are rampantly thriving.

Just last year, taxes from the sales of legal marijuana crossed the $1 billion mark.

Why do people use marijuana?

Marijuana is a drug that is extracted from the cannabis plant. This plant is being cultivated in several countries across the globe now. People have their reasons to use it. Most doctors prescribe marijuana drugs owing to the medical benefits it has whereas many smoke it to reduce stress and cut off depression.

Young adults and teenagers are using marijuana more than ever because of its legalization in several states. However, smoking should be done cautiously to avoid any issue. You can consult Grasscity the world’s oldest headshop if you are looking for smoking accessories that can help in using marijuana better.

Medical Benefits of Marijuana

Helps in Chemotherapy Treatment

Chemotherapy treatment is given to patients who suffer from cancer. The aftermaths of the treatment include nausea and vomiting. Smoking marijuana can help in cutting down these aftermaths, thus making a person feel better.

It can relieve chronic pain

This is one of the main reasons why elderly people make frequent visits to marijuana stores to buy it. Marijuana is known to cure chronic pain in the muscle and joints. Though it might not be able to directly cure severe muscle damage or pain, it can surely cut down the chronic pain.

Helps in reducing migraine attacks

Migraines are severe headaches that disturb a patient’s routine completely. One who goes through these attacks can exactly tell what they’re going through. Marijuana helps cope with these attacks and provides relief to a patient. Marijuana is inclusive of cannabinoids which are strong activators of the endocannabinoid system.

Can help in cutting down Alzheimer

Alzheimer is a widely growing disease across the globe. The potential damage is inclusive of the loss of brain cells. There are some hormones excreted by the brain that kill the cells in it. Marijuana can help by forming plaque enzymes which will stop the process of dying brain cells.

Marijuana can help in reducing high blood pressure

Patients who suffer from hypertension are at great risk of heart strokes and nervous breakdown. Though it is still not confirm as to how the mechanism works but a study from 1979 did conclude that it helps in cutting down hypertension. Moreover, people who suffer from the issue have reported to having a stabilized heartbeat after marijuana intake.

Helps in reducing anxiety

Overconsumption of marijuana is the major cause of anxiety but reverse done; it can help in reducing it. People who smoke marijuana have deduced that it reduces anxiety and relieves their stress.

Can Cure Sleep Disorders

People with sleep disorders are often prescribed with marijuana. This is true; the drug can be used to treat patients who suffer from multiple issues related to sleep. Many people often complain of sleepless nights, nightmares and hallucinations. Smoking marijuana before bed or taking it in a drug form can help in getting a good night sleep.

Helps in reducing Acne breakouts

Acne is a major skin disease that affects many people globally. Not only does it make a person look less appealing but also disrupts the routine life of an individual in terms of communicating with the rest of the world. Acne breakouts result from over-production of a hormone in the skin. Marijuana can help by stopping the production of that element.

Conclusion!

Lastly, marijuana has several other benefits that are lesser known to people. The legalization of the drug is enough evidence that suffices for the notion of medical benefits. The use of marijuana continues to grow with higher revenues for the manufacturers and more taxes for the state. It is no wonder that a drug that was infamous at once is now famous for all the right reasons in the medical industry.

Teens Living In US States Allowing Medical Marijuana Smoke Less Cannabis

MASSACHUSETTS: According to a large-scale study of American high school students, legalizing medicinal marijuana has actually led to a drop in cannabis use among teenagers.

The study, published in the American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse used the results of an anonymous survey given to more than 800,000 high school students across 45 states to calculate the number of teens who smoke cannabis.

It found that the number of teenage cannabis smokers was 1.1% less in states that had enacted medical marijuana laws (MML) compared to those that hadn’t, even when accounting for other important variables such as tobacco and alcohol policies, economic trends, youth characteristics and state demographics.

“We found that for every group of 100 adolescents, one fewer will be a current user of marijuana following the enactment of medical marijuana laws,” says Dr Rebekah Levine Coley, a Professor of psychology at Boston College, who led the study.

“When we looked at particular subgroups of adolescents, this reduction became even more pronounced. For example 3.9% less Black and 2.7% less Hispanic youths now use marijuana in states with MML”.

As the survey was administered over a period of 16 years, the researchers were able to compare the changes in teenager’s marijuana use in states that adopted MML with those that hadn’t, allowing them to more precisely pinpoint the effects of the legislation. Intriguingly, the study found that the longer the laws had been in place, the greater the reduction in teen marijuana use.

The results shine a light on an important debate taking place in America about the relative benefits and risks of decriminalizing marijuana.

“Some people have argued that decriminalizing or legalizing medical marijuana could increase cannabis use amongst young people, either by making it easier for them to access, or by making it seem less harmful.” says Dr Rebekah Levine Coley.

“However, we saw the opposite effect. We were not able to determine why this is, but other research has suggested that after the enactment of medical marijuana laws, youths’ perceptions of the potential harm of marijuana use actually increased. Alternatively, another theory is that as marijuana laws are becoming more lenient, parents may be increasing their supervision of their children, or changing how they talk to them about drug use.”

Importantly the study found that unlike medical marijuana laws, decriminalizing recreational marijuana had no noticeable effect on adolescents’ cannabis use, except for a small decline in marijuana smoking among 14-year olds and people from Hispanic backgrounds, and an increase in use among white adolescents. Neither policies had any effect on frequent or heavy users of marijuana, suggesting that these students are not easily influenced by state laws.

Texas Medicine and Railroad Gin: Lessons From Prohibition

By Michael A. Stusser

The 18th Amendment revoked the sales and use of alcohol in the United States in 1919. Shocking as it may seem that such an act could become law, the roots of Prohibition were complex (people were drinking too damn much canned heat) – and misguided. The government created a campaign to scare Americans about liquor with propaganda that looks shockingly similar to another era of prohibition – the one launched against marijuana use. (Not surprisingly, Americans continued boozing it up – through home distilleries making moonshine, private speakeasies, and mob-led bootlegging.)

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We’re highlighting the shared journey of alcohol and cannabis prohibition – because they’re retroactively such hilarious images – and we can learn many lessons from these historical documents as we continue to fight for the legalization (and decriminalization) of weed. Laws attempting to legislate morality and ban items that are not evil or against public welfare have never worked – but Bless ‘Em for Trying!

Here’s a look at some of the ways both Prohibition and Reefer Madness were marketed to the masses

"Medicinal Whiksky" and "MJ Medicine"

“Medicinal Whiksky” and “MJ Medicine”

Before Prohibition (as with cannabis), alcohol was frequently touted to help with various ailments. Here is a bottle of bonded “medicinal whiskey” labelled “for Medicinal Purposes Only.” Cannabis, of course, has been helping with chronic pain, stress, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, glaucoma, cancer and much more for centuries.

AntiSaloon
An “Anti-Saloon League” was formed to promote prohibition. (The group became popular with many inside the government after passage of the income tax amendment in 1913 – as they were no longer dependent on booze to fund operations.) This is from their newspaper, The American Issue, from Jan. 25, 1919.

Screenshot 2018-07-27 13.54.26While women were major backers of the early Temperance Campaigns, they also rallied for Repeal of Prohibition. Women are, of course, also leading the legalization movement and many are CEOs of prominent cannabis companies and organizations.

TemperanceAbuse
As early as 1871, the campaign against spirits had begun. Here is a Temperance illustration of a drunk man hitting his wife. Much of the prohibition propaganda was sold as a way to protect women and children from boozing hubbies and fathers coming home wasted from work, drinking his paycheck away and raising hell and havoc.

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Straight to the Point. The bottle or your best girl!

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Asking American to choose their country or their cocktail, posters like these advocated for Prohibition during World War I.

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A far cry from biblical verse (“Wine that gladdens human hearts, oil to make their faces shine, and bread that sustains their hearts”), firewater was eventually sold to the masses as dangerous, deadly rotgut.

ReeferMadnessMove
In 1936 the now infamous film Reefer Madness was released, warning Mom & Pops about the dangers of weed by showing a group of pot-smoking teenagers descending into a hellscape of murder, madness, suicide and violence after firing up a fatty. Yikes!

DavilsHarvest
Similar to the Prohibition propaganda attempting to scare wives about drunken husbands, this 1942 film used the Devil himself to put the fear of God into families.

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Like films such as Reefer Madness and Assassin of Youth, Marihuana attempted to scare the Bejesus out of the general public with absurd claims of cannabis leading to wild orgies (if only!), impregnation, heroin addiction and, yes, kidnapping. That’s some strong ganja!

prohibcelebration
PROHIBITION REPEALED! Oh Happy Day! By 1933, Americans had had more than enough prohibition, and public opposition had become overwhelming. First Congress passed an act legalizing beer and wine, and by December of 1933 Utah became the 36th State to ratify the 22nd Amendment – repealing the 18th (Prohibition) and restoring the sale and manufacture of alcohol.

Screenshot 2018-07-27 14.16.44And soon, we’ll have a National Celebration for the Legalization of Cannabis!

Author Michael Stusser is the host of Higher Ground, the World’s first talk show highlighting cannabis culture. Think of it as “The Daily Show” meets “Good Morning America”…but with a giant bong on the desk. For more on Higher Ground and host Michael Stusser, visit www.highergroundtv.com   or www.michaelstusser.com

Canada Introduces Legislation To Legalize Marijuana

By Rob Gilles, Associated Press

CANADA:— Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government introduced legislation Thursday to let adult possess up to 30 grams of marijuana in public — a measure that would make Canada the largest developed country to end a nationwide prohibition on recreational marijuana.

Trudeau has long promised to legalize recreational pot use and sales. U.S voters in California, Massachusetts, Maine and Nevada voted last year to approve the use of recreational marijuana, joining Colorado, Washington, Oregon and Alaska. The South American nation of Uruguay is the only nation to legalize recreational pot.

The proposed law allows four plants to be grown at home. Those under 18 found with less than five grams of marijuana would not face criminal charges but those who sell it or give to youth could face up to 14 years in jail.  “It’s too easy for our kids to get marijuana. We’re going to change that,” Trudeau said.

Officials said Canadians should be able to smoke marijuana legally by July 1, 2018. The legislation must still be approved by Parliament but with Trudeau’s Liberal party holding a majority its passage in considered assured.

The federal government set the age at 18, but is allowing each of Canada’s provinces to determine if it should be higher. The provinces will also decide how the drug will be distributed and sold. The law also defines the amount of THC in a driver’s blood, as detected by a roadside saliva test, that would be illegal. Marijuana taxes will be announced at a later date.

The Canadian government closely followed the advice of a marijuana task force headed by former Liberal Health Minister Anne McLellan. That panel’s report noted public health experts tend to favor a minimum age of 21 as the brain continues to develop to about 25, but said setting the minimum age too high would preserve the illicit market.  Canadian youth have higher rates of cannabis use than their peers worldwide.

“If your objective is to protect public health and safety and keep cannabis out of the hands of minors, and stop the flow of profits to organized crime, then the law as it stands today has been an abject failure,” Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale told a news conference. “Police forces spend between $2 billion and $3 billion every year trying to deal with cannabis, and yet Canadian teenagers are among the heaviest users in the western world … We simply have to do better.”

Goodale said they’ve been close touch with the U.S. government on the proposed law and noted exporting and importing marijuana will continue to be illegal.  “The regime we are setting up in Canada will protect our kids better and stop the flow of illegal dollars to organized crime. Our system will actually be the better one,” Goodale said.

But Christina Grant, a professor of pediatrics at McMaster University in Ontario, worries the government is conveying the message that marijuana is not harmful. She fears usage will go up because concerns about its safety will dissipate.  “One in seven youths who have used cannabis will develop an addiction to cannabis and that impacts your life, schooling, job prospects, social and emotional relationships,” she said. “And there is the risk of developing psychosis if you start using cannabis as a teenager. The more you use and the younger you start, you have up to four times the risk of developing some kind of psychotic illness.”

Former Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair, who is the parliamentary secretary to the justice minister, said officials learned from the experiences from other jurisdictions like Colorado and Washington state.  While the government moves to legalize marijuana, retail outlets selling pot for recreational use have already been set up. Trudeau has emphasized current laws should be respected. Police in Toronto, Vancouver and other cities raided stores earlier last month and made arrests.

The news that Canada was soon going to announce the law was noticed online last month by Snoop Dogg , who tweeted “Oh Canada!” Canadian folk singer Pat Robitaille released a “Weed song” to coincide with the government’s announcement.

Teen Marijuana Use In Colorado And Washington Dropped More Than The National Average in 2014-2015

COLORADO: The federal government quietly published new national survey data this week that shows rates of teen marijuana use in Colorado and Washington — the first two states to legalize and regulate marijuana for adult use — decreased more than the national average in 2014-2015. Fewer teens in the two states are reportedly using marijuana than in 2012-2013, just prior to the commencement of legal adult marijuana sales.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) released the results of the 2014-2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) on Tuesday along with a press release that did not include any mention of marijuana.

According to the NSDUH:

  • In Colorado, the rate of 12-17-year-olds who used marijuana in the past month dropped 1.43 percentage points from 12.56% in 2013-2014 to 11.13% in 2014-2015, compared to 11.16% in 2012-2013. The rate of past-year use dropped 2.46 percentage points from 20.81% in 2013-2014 to 18.35% in 2014-2015, compared to 18.76% in 2012-2013.
  • In Washington, the rate of 12-17-year-olds who used marijuana in the past month dropped 0.89 percentage points from 10.06% in 2013-2014 to 9.17% in 2014-2015, compared to 9.81% in 2012-2013. The rate of past-year use dropped 1.92 percentage points from 17.53% in 2013-2014 to 15.61% in 2014-2015, compared to 16.48% in 2012-2013.
  • Nationwide, the rate of past-month marijuana use among 12-17-year-olds dropped 0.02 percentage points from 7.22% in 2013-2014 to 7.2% in 2014-2015, and the rate of past-year use dropped 0.42 percentage points from 13.28% to 12.86%.

The overall findings of the NSDUH are in line with those of the annual Monitoring the Future survey sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), which were released last week and found little change in rates of teen marijuana use.

“I don’t have an explanation. This is somewhat surprising,” said NIDA Director Dr. Nora Volkow in an article published last week by U.S. News and World Report. “We had predicted based on the changes in legalization, culture in the U.S. as well as decreasing perceptions among teenagers that marijuana was harmful that [accessibility and use] would go up. But it hasn’t gone up.”

Statement from Mason Tvert, director of communications for the Marijuana Policy Project:

“Survey after survey is finding little change in rates of teen marijuana use despite big changes in marijuana laws around the nation. Colorado and Washington are dispelling the myth that regulating marijuana for adult use will somehow cause an increase in use among adolescents. Legalization opponents will surely continue to make dire predictions about teens, so lawmakers and voters need to be informed about these government reports that invalidate them.

“Decades of arresting and prosecuting countless adults failed to prevent teens from accessing and using marijuana. States like Colorado and Washington are taking a new approach and actually controlling the production and sale of marijuana. Their success has already inspired a handful of other states to adopt similar laws, and more are sure to follow.”

Twins Study Finds No Evidence That Marijuana Lowers IQ In Teens

UNITED KINGDOM: Roughly half of Americans use marijuana at some point in their lives, and many start as teenagers. Although some studies suggest the drug could harm the maturing adolescent brain, the true risk is controversial. Now, in the first study of its kind, scientists have analyzed long-term marijuana use in teens, comparing IQ changes in twin siblings who either used or abstained from marijuana for 10 years. After taking environmental factors into account, the scientists found no measurable link between marijuana use and lower IQ.

“This is a very well-conducted study … and a welcome addition to the literature,” says Valerie Curran, a psychopharmacologist at the University College London. She and her colleagues reached “broadly the same conclusions” in a separate, non-twin study of more than2000 British teenagers, published earlier this month in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, she says. But, warning that the study has important limitations, George Patton, a psychiatric epidemiologist at the University of Melbourne in Australia, adds that it in no way proves that marijuana—particularly heavy, or chronic use —is safe for teenagers.

Most studies that linked marijuana to cognitive deficits, such as memory loss and low IQ, looked at a single “snapshot” in time, says statistician Nicholas Jackson of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, lead author of the new work. That makes it impossible to tell which came first: drug use or poor cognitive performance. “It’s a classic chicken-egg scenario,” he says.

 

Boulder To Give Grants For Marijuana Education

COLORADO: Surveys of Boulder County teenagers show that a substantial majority view binge-drinking as a harmful behavior. A much smaller majority sees regular marijuana use in the same light.

Public health officials fear that the recent legalization of marijuana gives too many teenagers and parents the impression that it is safe.

Boulder plans to make up to $250,000 available next year for education efforts aimed at changing perceptions and reducing marijuana use among young people.

“There could be a perception that because it’s legal, it’s not harmful,” Karen Rahn, Boulder’s director of Human Services, told the City Council last week. “That perception is there with alcohol too, but because marijuana has recently been legalized, there is a window of opportunity to influence public perception.”

However, at the urging of the Boulder City Council, those grants will focus on comprehensive substance abuse education rather than more directly on marijuana.

Critics Take Aim At Marijuana Mascot

OHIO: A green and white superhero stumping for marijuana legalization votes at college campuses and bars in Ohio has sparked debate over its impact on children. “Buddie” is a fuzzy, ever-smiling pot bud in a bulging white muscle suit with green trunks, gloves and boots. He arrives in a truck painted with marijuana leaves declaring: “Yes on legalization.”

Children’s health advocates opposed to legalization said Buddie is reminiscent of Joe Camel, the cartoon dromedary proven so effective at marketing cigarettes to teenagers in the 1990s that R.J. Reynolds was forced to retire his image. They said the pot mascot makes light of a dangerous illegal drug in a manner appealing to kids. “We didn’t believe it when we saw the photos. We were pretty shocked,” said Nick Lashutka, president of the Ohio Children’s Hospitals Association that’s involved in fighting the legalization effort. “This is nothing less than a ploy to market to children.”

ResponsibleOhio, the campaign seeking in November to legalize marijuana for medical and recreational use, said Buddie is nothing like Joe Camel. Executive Director Ian James said the mascot is not marketing marijuana but asking for votes – and speaking exclusively to voting-age students. “Buddie only addresses people that are 18 and older, and Buddie works specifically with voters,” James said. “Buddie has no connection with anybody under 18 because anybody under 18 can’t vote.” Also, James said, Joe Camel’s tobacco product was legal whereas anyone selling marijuana in Ohio today “would go to jail.”

More College Students Regularly Smoke Marijuana Than Tobacco, Survey Finds

MICHIGAN:  More U.S. college students are making a habit of using marijuana, which has supplanted tobacco cigarettes as the smoke-able substance of choice among undergraduates who light up regularly, a study released Tuesday found.

Just under 6 percent of the full-time students surveyed by University of Michigan researchers for the annual “Monitoring the Future” study reported using pot either every day or at least 20 times in the previous 30 days.

By contrast, 5 percent of respondents identified themselves as heavy cigarette smokers, a steep decline from the 19 percent who said they smoked daily in 1999.

The findings suggest that teenagers and young adults have absorbed public health warnings about the dangers of cigarettes but increasingly regard marijuana as benign or carrying few risks, lead investigator Lloyd Johnston said.