Search Results for: pain

A Guide To Using CBD For Pain Management

Cannabidiol, commonly known as CBD, is a term that’s gained quite a traction in the medical world. A substance that naturally occurs in the cannabis plant, CBD doesn’t result in the “high” that is typically linked to cannabis. In fact, the “high” feeling is a result of using tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is another kind of cannabinoid.

So, why has CBD gained so much popularity recently? Well, studies suggest that topical CBD products, CBD oil, in particular, provide a remedy for chronic pain and decrease inflammation, pain, and discomfort linked to different health conditions.

Due to these benefits, it is a valuable alternative for people suffering from chronic pain and, hence, turn to stronger medications for relief. Such drugs, while useful, tend to result in side effects and cause dependency.

While research on CBD and its possible results are still ongoing, the future looks promising. Using CBD for pain is only going to become more common soon.

Capsules and Pills

Images: Pexels.com

Types of CBD Products

CBD is available in a variety of forms, and whichever type you choose depends on what you need to use CBD for. These forms typically include the following:

Tinctures and oils: Liquid infused with CBD is taken orally by placing it under your tongue with a dropper. This form is excellent for people who aren’t comfortable taking capsules or pills.

Lotions and creams: These topical treatments are great for joint and muscle pain. They can also be used for skin conditions, such as psoriasis and eczema.

Capsules and pills: Such forms are commonly used to treat digestive issues and seizure disorders and may take some time to take effect once ingested.

Edibles: Ingesting gummies is one of the most common ways for CBD intake due to the taste, portability, affordability, and precision. 

Vaping: This form is the fastest way to experience the effects of CBD. Once CBD is inhaled through e-cigarettes, for instance, its compounds are directly absorbed into your bloodstream.

CBD For Pain Relief

Here are four ways CBD can help with pain:

Every person’s body contains an endocannabinoid system (ECS), a cell-signaling system. According to research, what makes CBD effective is the impact it has on the endocannabinoid receptors found in a person’s immune system and brain.

These receptors are linked to a person’s cells and receive chemical signals from various stimuli and allow your cells to react. This reaction is what results in pain relief and anti-inflammation and, hence, helps manage chronic pain, such as post-trauma pain, back pain, and post-surgical pain.

Arthritis Pain Relief

Today, arthritis affects around 54 million Americans and is the leading cause of disability in the U.S. The two most common kinds of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

The former is a degenerative disease that affects the bones and joints cartilage in the thumb, hip, and knee joints. The latter is an autoimmune disease where a person’s immune system attacks the joints and causes inflammation. It often occurs in the hands and feet.

While using CBD to treat pain related to arthritis does have a positive outlook, research has only been conducted on rats. Considerable research still needs to be carried out to prove if CBD is as effective in this area as it seems to be.

Cancer Treatment Pain Relief

Treatments for cancer, such as chemotherapy and radiation, come with their side effects, such as nausea, loss of appetite, and pain. According to research, CBD eases these side effects and also helps reduce inflammation and anxiety that results from these treatments.

Migraines

Throughout history, cannabis has been used as pain relief for headaches. While research isn’t specific, it does suggest that substances found in the cannabis plant result in therapeutic effects for headaches, especially migraines.

It’s important to note that these studies typically use the entire marijuana plant, which, apart from CBD, also contains THC. Hence, it is difficult to pinpoint whether these therapeutic effects are a result of THC, CBD, or both.

Side Effects

Intake of any product for medicinal purposes requires full awareness of its potential side effects. While CBD doesn’t have any significant risks associated with it, it may cause some side effects, such as:

  • Changes in weight and appetite
  • Diarrhea
  • Fatigue

Additionally, if you’re currently taking any dietary supplements, prescription medicines, or over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, CBD may interfere with their results.

Conclusion

While research is still underway, CBD may provide pain relief for people suffering from various conditions. CBD should ideally be introduced to your body in small doses and then built up from there.

Moreover, it’s vital to consult your doctor to ensure it doesn’t interfere with any other treatments you may be undergoing. Your doctor can also help you figure out the dosage that’s right for you.

As more research is conducted, the uncertainty around using CBD for pain will decrease.

Have you used CBD to treat pain or any other medical conditions? Let us know in the comments below!

Finding The Best CBD Cream For Pain – What To Look For In A Good Product

The market for CBD products is expanding rapidly, and looks as if it will continue to do so as more benefits are reported about this remarkable substance. What is CBD, and why is it controversial? Here’s a brief explanation of the origins of CBD, and you’ll soon see why there is some controversy!

CBD is short for cannabidiol, which is one of more than 100 compounds that have been extracted form the cannabis plant. There is the controversial aspect for you – it comes from cannabis. Of course, cannabis – or marijuana or weed – is associated with getting you ‘high’ and, in most states of the USA, is an illegal substance.

However, CBD does not give you this high. This is because the psychoactive element in cannabis is another compound, known as THC. In CBD products – whether they are oils, edibles or – as we are talking about here – creams, THC is not present, or may be so only in minute trace quantities.

So, CBD is safe, is natural, and has been widely reported as being an active pain reliever. Yet, as more research is needed into the product and its effects, it is not yet passed in all states as a medical product (although it is in some states).

What Ailments can CBD Help With?

There are widespread reports from patients, and there have been some clinical trials, that prove CBD can help relieve pain for sufferers of a wide range of ailments. These include MS, arthritis, HIV, diabetes, psoriasis and many more, as well as the effects of chemotherapy. It also has properties that help people who have trouble sleeping, and may help with anxiety and depression.

CBD has been available in many forms for some time – some people vape oil, others chew on gummies – and one of the most useful for people with skin ailments is CBD cream. Applied to the skin, it can help soothe as well as ease the pain, and there are many specially formulated products on the market.

Which is the best CBD cream for pain for you, and what should you look for? First, you need to ensure that the product you buy is from a reputable manufacturer, and one who has used carefully cultivated industrial hemp plants – the strain of cannabis from which CBD must be made to be legal – as there are examples of fake products that come from China, and elsewhere. These can be contaminated, and may not even be CBD. The link above gives you an excellent guide to the brands to look for, and how and where to buy them.

Further Information

You may want to examine the ingredients of various CBD creams before you choose the right one. For example, while many patients have reported that a CBD cream containing the permitted trace amounts of THC is more effective for them, others do not like the effect of THC – which can be notable even in such small amounts.

If it’s for skin ailments, you may also want to look for additional ingredients that may help with your skin problem. Some creams include the likes of beeswax and cocoa butter, and you should always ensure the additional products are organic and natural.

We should add that prices can vary greatly, so you may want to shop around – but beware of very cheap products for the reason mentioned above – and if you are currently on any medication discuss it with your doctor first.

As research continues, so the uses for CBD become clearer, but so far it is clear that pain relief is one. Try it for yourself, and see if CBD cream can help relieve your chronic pain.

Ohio Board Of Pharmacy Awards Dispensary Certificate Of Operation In Painesville Township

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OHIO: The State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy today awarded a Dispensary Certificate of Operation to Bloom Medicinals, LLC, located at 382 Blackbrook Rd., Painesville Township.

For a list of all Dispensary Certificates of Operation, please click here.

8 Best Complementary Health Approaches For Chronic Pain

Complementary and integrative medicine, otherwise known as CIM, encompasses both Western medicine and complementary health approaches as a new combined strategy to treat many clinical conditions.

Chronic pain is, in fact, the leading indication for the use of CIM. According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), about 33% of adults and 12% of children in the US have used CIM in this context.

“All of us that are thinking about the management of chronic pain are aware that, alongside the use of pharmaceuticals, we need other approaches,” said Josephine Briggs, the head of NCCIH.

Pain has both physical and mental components, which is why most types of chronic pain could be managed through approaches that are medication-free and have very few negative side effects.

Some of the strategies that seem to offer the best results for those with chronic pain include mindful meditation, CBT, acupuncture, deep breathing exercises, use of CBD oil, and so on. Continue reading to learn more about the said practices for treating chronic pain.

Mind over Matter

Mind Over Matter

Mindfulness is a modern complementary health approach for pain originated from ancient Eastern philosophy.

“It’s a practice designed to cultivate the cognitive state of mindfulness that is premised on nonjudgmental awareness of the present situation,” said Fadel Zeidan, a mindfulness and pain researcher at Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, US.

Over the past few decades, thousands of studies have investigated the effects of mindfulness on both mental and physical health. A 1985 study showed that about a 10-week of mindfulness training gave significant benefits to patients with chronic pain, including lowering the amount of medication they took.

However, a recent analysis of studies showed evidence that mindfulness treatments can improve pain in people with a variety of conditions.

Mindful meditation focuses mainly on the present and emphasizes acceptance instead of focusing on the past or future. When it comes to meditating, a person will usually focus on a particular word, object, or breathing pattern.

Mindful medication doesn’t eliminate pain. But it has shown to improve the quality of life for those with chronic pain. The medication has also been found to release tension and reduce stress hormones.

Acupuncture

Long practiced in traditional Eastern medicine as a treatment; acupuncture is an alternative therapy which involves using needles to stimulate specific points on the body.

These points are said to connect with meridians – certain pathways that carry vital energy (or “chi”) throughout the body.

Blockages in the flow of chi disrupt well-being, which leads to illness. By stimulating acupuncture points, acupuncturists aim to clear up those blockages and restore the patient’s health and vitality.

Here are some of the pain conditions that showed to improve with the use of acupuncture:

  • Headaches and Migraines: A study suggests that acupuncture is more effective than medication in protecting against migraines. It’s also beneficial for those with frequent episodic or chronic tension headaches.
  • Low Back Pain: As already mentioned, acupuncture tends to focus on certain channels, some of which correspond to specific points on the body. There are a few acupuncture points — back of the knees, foot, lower back, hip, hand, and stomach — that can help you recover from lower back pain.
  • Arthritis: People with osteoarthritis can benefit from acupuncture. An intensive two- to four-week treatment regimen can offer significant short-term relief of osteoarthritis-related knee pain.

Acupuncture releases opioid-like chemicals in your body, which causes the body to release neurotransmitters that shut off your receptors to pain. It also triggers the electromagnetic impulses with the body, helping to speed up the release of endorphins. This allows your body to manage pain more easily.

Biofeedback

Biofeedback is another complementary health approach for chronic pain, such as low back pain. It involves becoming aware of physiological processes in the body and learning how to control a portion of them.

There are two common forms of biofeedback:

  • Neuromuscular biofeedback: This practice can be used to treat a variety of musculoskeletal conditions. It uses electromyography (EMG), which translates muscles contracting and relaxing on a graph or into numbers, or real-time ultrasound imaging (RTUS), which works similarly and muscles are displayed on a screen contracting and relaxing in real time.
  • Cardiovascular biofeedback: This technique involves tracking blood pressure, heart rate, and other cardiovascular functions. A therapist may often use an electrocardiogram to monitor HRV (heart rate variability), which measures the time between heartbeats. This practice usually focuses on learning to control breathing.

Biofeedback is often done in conjunction with CBT and relaxation exercises.

CBT – Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

The goal of CBT is to recognize negative thoughts and redirect them towards coping thoughts. This can ultimately make chronic pain a livable part of daily life. Generally, cognitive behavioral therapy is provided by a mind-body therapist or psychologist.

“CBT is a useful and empirically based method of treatment for pain disorders which can decrease reliance on the excessive use of opiates,” said Donna M. Sudak of Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, and Muhammad Hassan Majeed of Natchaug Hospital, Mansfield Center, Connecticut.

According to them, the use of CBT can avoid or reduce the use of opioids of chronic pain. It helps patients understand that pain is a stressor, and similar to other stressors, it is something they can adapt to and easily cope with.

Progressive Muscle Relaxation

This practice involves tensing and relaxing certain muscle groups followed by a release of muscle tension. If practiced regularly, it can teach you to be more aware of where the pain is coming from as well as help you relieve muscle tension.

Deep Breathing Exercises

Chronic pain often leads to strained breathing, including taking shallow breaths. This can cause dizziness and chest pain. By taking deep breaths over a period of time, your body will consume more oxygen, improve lung function, and ultimately enhance the overall energy levels.

Guided Imagery

This one is a rather simple yet effective method. During pain flare-ups, consider focusing on a pleasant scene or soothing image. This will help distract attention from the discomfort.

CBD Oil

CBD Oil Pix

There are different compound levels found in the natural hemp. How people breed hemp affects CBD levels. CBD oil that comes from industrial hemp usually has a higher CBD content than cannabis.

Different methods are used to extract the compound, which is then added to a carrier oil called Cannabidiol or CBD oil. It comes in many different strengths and is used in various ways.

People have been using CBD traditionally for hundreds of years to treat various types of pain. One report found that short-term use of CBD oil can reduce the levels of spasticity a person feels. The same report studied the use of CBD oil for pain, especially chronic pain.

Researchers compiled the results of several systematic reviews covering dozens of studies and trials. Their research concluded that there’s substantial evidence of cannabis being an effective treatment for chronic pain in adults.

Another study in the Journal of Experimental Medicine suggests that using CBD oil can reduce pain and inflammation, supporting the above-mentioned results.

Wrapping Up

When it comes to chronic pain, some of us reach for a pain remedy — something that is quick and easy. Well, of course, popping a pill may offer you fast relief, but other options may actually offer you long-term better health. Consider the complementary health approaches mentioned in this article to help treat your chronic pain naturally.

Study: Majority Of Medical Cannabis Patients Are Seeking Pain Relief

MICHIGAN: Most US patients registered to access medical cannabis cite chronic pain as their primary qualifying condition, according to data published in the journal Health Affairs.

Investigators from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor reviewed patient registration data from the majority of states that provide medical cannabis access. (Some states, notably California and Maine, possess voluntary registries and therefore do not compile patient profile data.)

They reported that in 2016, chronic pain was the most common qualifying condition reported by patients (65 percent). They added, “Of all patient-reported qualifying conditions, 85 percent had either substantial or conclusive evidence of therapeutic efficacy,” as defined by the 2017 report published by the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The authors of that report concluded that there exists conclusive or substantial evidence for the effectiveness of cannabis in the treatment of chronic pain, nausea and vomiting, and spasticity.

Separate studies indicate that legal cannabis access is typically associated with reduced rates of opioid use and abuse. Studies have also identified a reduction in the prevalence of opioid-related mortality following statewide marijuana access.

Authors concluded: “[O]ur data show that the number of medical cannabis patients has risen dramatically over time as more states have legalized medical cannabis. … [W]e believe not only that it is inappropriate for cannabis to remain a Schedule I substance, but also that state and federal policy makers should begin evaluating evidence-based ways for safely integrating cannabis research and products into the health care system.”


For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “Qualifying conditions of medical cannabis license holders in the United States,” appears in Health Affairs. Additional information is available in NORML’s fact-sheet, “Relationship Between Marijuana and Opioids.”

Combining Yoga With CBD For Pain Relief

By Isabella

Introduction

Cannabidiol, or CBD for short, is a new marijuana derivative, a plant compound known as a cannabinoid, that has seen an increased presence in the wellness and alternative medicine market in the past few years. With the loosening of cannabis laws and the dispelling of persistent myths about the plant, and CBD in particular, many consumers have added the substance in their everyday routine.

People who have turned to CBD for anxiety relief and pain management have done so because, unlike cannabis’ psychoactive compound—THC—CBD does not cause a high. Consumers can enjoy the physical and mental benefits of cannabis products without worrying of psychotropic consequences. This is why wellness-oriented individuals have suggested that you can combine CBD consumption with a yoga routine.

CBD is big business

How Does CBD Work?

When someone’s skin absorbs CBD, it activates their endocannabinoid system, which aids in regulating the nervous and immune systems, responding to aches and pains. Our cannabinoid receptors, and in particular those in the peripheral and central nervous systems, make your brain sense that you’re feeling pain or aches in your joints and muscles. These receptors, in turn, signal our brain to desensitize the pain at the site of it.

Why combine CBD with yoga?

Yoga is popular among many different demographics for being able to treat several aches and pains, particularly in the neck and lower back. In a study, 66% of the people who reported pain in a particular area in their body said they also saw improvement in their bone, muscle, and joint pain after yoga.

Combining these two wellness methods is vital. CBD acts in a fast and efficient way on our pain receptors, without the risk of physical and mental exertion. This works in conjunction with the mindfulness and physical exercise that yoga offers. Practitioners would introduce themselves to a more holistic approach to daily mental and physical wellness.

In fact, CBD and yoga can help put our systems at ease, moving them from “fight or flight” response, which is the norm for moments of anxiety, to state of “rest or digest”. When working in conjunction, yoga and CBD are also more effective in the treatment of everyday physical problems like inflammation and joint issues.

When and how to combine

You can consume CBD in many forms. If both CBD and yoga are part of your daily routine, the best way to go about it incorporating this combination would be taking a few drops of CBD oil or another kind of edible a short while before climbing onto the mat for your yoga. If you are taking a CBD supplement with food, it is important to remember to give it enough time to kick in, as it would be digested with that meal.

Alternatively, and if you are worried about areas like wrists and elbows that are sensitive to yoga pain, you could apply CBD lotion on those areas. Human skin absorbs cannabidiol much faster than our digestive system, allowing you to begin physical activity almost immediately.

Conclusion

Yoga has been seeing an increase in popularity for many decades now, and cannabidiol is swiftly catching up. With virtually no side effects and excellent synergy, combining the two could be what you need to take your daily exercise routine to the next level of wellness.


Isabella is a freelance writer from Los Angeles specializing in writing for the holistic health and cannabis industries. She’s also a full-time yoga enthusiast and an advocate for mindful wellness.

New MyJane Study: Majority of Orange County Women Would Consider Cannabis to Treat Stress, Sleep Issues and Pain

CALIFORNIA:  Seventy-nine percent of women surveyed in Orange County, California, agree that their most common health and wellness issues can be addressed with cannabis products, according to a just-released survey conducted by San Diego-based research firm GroupSolver for MyJane in advance of its launch. The survey also revealed the state of Orange County cannabis usage, documenting that up to 40 percent of Orange County respondents who experience stress and anxiety, sleep issues or pain turn to cannabis for relief.

However, approximately 30 percent of recreational or medicinal cannabis users feel uncomfortable purchasing through a dispensary, with 79 percent of respondents expressing interest in trying a curated cannabis subscription service just for women. The survey reached out to 42,000 women in Orange County who met qualification criteria and had a margin of error of less than 5 percent with a confidence level of 90 percent.

These findings reveal a gap in cannabis education and accessibility in Orange County, according to MyJane founder and CEO Kimberly Kovacs, and signal that women want alternatives. She and a founding team of entrepreneurs — Chief Technology Officer Ryan Reid, Chief Scientist Cam Woods and Chief Creative Officer Cara Stewart Raffele — are dedicated to closing this gap and helping women feel better.

“Through MyJane, women will be empowered to take control of their personal wellness, create routines proven to work for them, and reject the idea that one size fits all in health and wellness,” Kovacs said. “Through education, accessibility and community, we will offer women the confidence to make informed health and wellness choices about cannabis.”

Kovacs will be one of the featured investor sharks at the Arcview International Investor Forum in San Francisco, July 19-21, 2018.

Launching in fall 2018, MyJane will offer the first premium cannabis subscription service for women — tailored to meet their individual needs. The software platform is being designed to provide comprehensive research and education to ensure members always are in control of their wellness decisions, helping them create personalized routines just right for them. MyJane’s proprietary algorithm uses artificial intelligence to personalize health and wellness choices. The data collected will drive product choices, improve members’ experiences and add social proof to the void of useful data in the cannabis market.

Study: Majority Of Chronic Pain Patients Replace Opioids With Cannabis

OHIO: More than two-thirds of chronic pain patients registered to legally access medical cannabis products substitute marijuana for prescription opioids, according to data published in The Journal of Headache and Pain.

Investigators from the United States and Canada assessed the use of medical cannabis and prescription drugs in a cohort of over 2,000 Canadian patients licensed to access marijuana products. Among those patients with a primary diagnosis of chronic pain, 73 percent reported substituting cannabis in place of opioids. Among those patients diagnosed specifically with headache/migraine, cannabis was frequently reported as a substitute for other medications – including opiates (43 percent), anti-depressants (39 percent), NSAIDS (21 percent), triptans (8 percent), and anti-convulsants (8 percent).

“Most patients in the pain groups reported replacing prescription medications with medicinal cannabis, the most common of which were opiates/opioids across all patient groups,” authors concluded. “This is notable given the well-described ‘opioid-sparing effect’ of cannabinoids and growing abundance of literature suggesting that cannabis may help in weaning from these medications and perhaps providing a means of combating the opioid epidemic.”


For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “Patterns of medicinal cannabis use, strain analysis, and substitution effect among patients with migraine, headache, arthritis, and chronic pain in a medicinal cannabis cohort,” appears in The Journal of Headache and Pain. NORML’s fact-sheet highlighting the relevant, peer-reviewed research specific to the relationship between cannabis and opioids is available online.

Farmer Tom Travels To Spain

Last fall Farmer Tom had a chance to take an international trip to Spain to participate in Spannabis.  I have a long history with one of the private cannabis social clubs in Barcelona, Greenardos.  I first met them when they stayed with us on the farm for about a month, four years ago. During their visit, they got ahold of one of my seeds — a cross between Amnesia Haze and our Power Kush– and it turned out to be an amazing phenotype.  The club has carried it at their location for the last three years, and it has been one of their top strains.

Farmer Tom Spain

 

Spannabis was a blast.  I got to connect with cannabis enthusiast’s from around the world — all the top players were there. During my stay in Barcelona, I was warmly welcomed — not just because my strain had won many competitions throughout Europe — the locals are just genuinely very nice, gracious people.

 

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One of the highlights of my trip was seeing BC Barcelona play football. We watched them win, and Messi score the winning goal.  I spent a day making high quality solvent-less hash with the Dank Duchess and Blue Eyes. I learned a lot and had a wonderful experience with these great people. The best thing about Spain was the food.  I had some of the most amazing, high quality food I’ve ever eaten. From the seafood — fresh from the Mediterranean Seat and North Atlantic — to the fresh fruits and veggies.  My favorite was Hamon — a kind of ham made 100% from Ibérico pigs who are allowed to feed and roam completely free range.  The stuff you live for.

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After Spannabis I spent a day touring LaRambla, where we stopped by Weedmaps Spanish headquarters, and also went to visit Sensi magazine’s Cannabis and Hash Museum.  I was warmly welcomed at both locations.  We sat on the roof and smoked fatties at Weedmaps, and I got a personal tour of the cannabis museum by the curator and manager — it was quite an experience.

 

More Seniors Using Cannabis, Substituting It For Prescription Painkillers

CALIFORNIA:  Adults age 50 and older are far more likely to consume cannabis today than they were decades ago, according to population use data published in the journal Addiction.

Investigators with the Alcohol Research Group assessed trends in marijuana use between the years 1984 and 2015. Authors reported that, compared with older Americans 30 years ago, older respondents today are some 20 times more likely to acknowledge using cannabis.

“We found that rates of use among older groups increased quite significantly since the 1980s, especially for men in their fifties and sixties,” the study’s lead author stated in a press release. Their finding is consistent with those of other studies reporting upticks in cannabis use by seniors.

By contrast, respondents between the ages of 18 to 49 reported using cannabis at rates that are similar to those in the 1980s.

Separate data presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Geriatrics Society finds that as many as 65 percent of older adults reduce their use of prescription painkillers after initiating medical cannabis therapy – a finding that is consistent with those of numerous other studies assessing marijuana substitution patterns in various patient populations.


For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org.