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Marijuana Club Opens In Fairbanks, And The Owners Say It’s legal

ALASKA: A marijuana club that allows consumption but not sales quietly opened this week in Fairbanks, and its owners say they are operating within state law.

Coffee and doughnuts were out for customers at The Higher Calling Club, which opened Monday in a remodeled former wine bar downtown, the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reported. Patrons could sit on overstuffed couches or use a foosball table.

“We’re going to have the whole cafe feel to it is what we’re looking for,” said Marcus Mooers, who owns the business with his wife, Megan. “As you can see, we’re trying really hard not to just run some kind of stoner slum house.”

Club members can smoke pot or eat pot-infused foods but cannot buy or sell marijuana inside the building. The cost to join is $10 per day or $25 per month.

Panel Discusses Marijuana Businesses, Zoning For Fairbanks

ALASKA:  Just where in the Fairbanks North Star Borough marijuana businesses should be allowed and under what conditions continued to be discussed Friday by a special panel convened by Mayor Luke Hopkins

It was the second meeting of the marijuana working group. Hopkins is working on a new zoning ordinance, dealing with pot businesses, that is expected to be introduced in the coming weeks.

Borough planners presented ideas via PowerPoint, offering a glimpse into the kind of zoning ordinance the mayor is crafting.

Possible zones compatible with marijuana facilities are agricultural, commercial, industrial and general use, according to borough planner Kellen Spillman.

 

That’s Not Mistletoe … North Pole Won’t Block Pot Sales

ALASKA:  North Pole residents can put marijuana on their Christmas list next year.

The city council in North Pole, Alaska, rejected a measure Monday that would have banned marijuana dispensaries. Marijuana became legal in Alaska in February, and sales begin next year.

The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reported even Santa Claus — yes, that’s his real name — testified in favor of selling pot in this Christmas-themed town, where light poles resemble candy canes.

Claus said he is medical marijuana patient, and he’d like to buy pot in North Pole instead of making the short drive to Fairbanks.

Legislators Want To Put Marijuana Rules On The Fast Track, Clearing Up Details

ALASKA:  With legalized marijuana a month away, lawmakers are hoping to fast track legislation they hope will clear up legal gray areas.

On Friday, the Senate Judiciary Committee introduced Senate Bill 30 to address underage consumption, what constitutes a public place (because public consumption of marijuana will still be illegal) and addresses driving with marijuana.

Ballot Measure 2, which passed by wide margins in the Fairbanks and Juneau areas, makes marijuana possession, use and growing legal when the law officially goes into effect on Feb. 24, 2015. Commercial production and sales will follow next year.

North Pole Republican Sen. John Coghill, the vice-chair of the Judiciary Committee, said the bill is intended to give law enforcement clarity with how to enforce the changes. He said the goal is to get the bill passed before Feb. 24.

Alaska Officials Hear Law Enforcement View Of Legal Marijuana At Colorado Conference

ALASKA:  More than 500 people from 38 states packed a conference center just outside Denver on Wednesday for a crash course in “lessons learned” when it comes to marijuana legalization.

Of the 500, 40 claim Alaska as home. They include members of local governments from Fairbanks and Anchorage as well as members of state government who in less than six weeks will begin making marijuana rules.

The conference, “Marijuana Impact on Public Health and Safety in Colorado,” is hosted by the Colorado Association of Chiefs of Police. A contingent of Alaska officials on Tuesday also toured several marijuana businesses in the Denver area, coordinated by the law firm Vicente Sederberg, which specializes in marijuana legalization.

Partner and founding member Brian Vicente said the tour sites included marijuana grows and facilities that make edibles. The law firm often leads such tours, he said, in an effort to help people understand the effects of legalization.

 

Walker Considers Delay In Legal Alaska Marijuana Sales

ALASKA:  Alaska Gov. Bill Walker will consider a 90-day delay in implementing a regulatory system for legal marijuana sales.

Walker spokeswoman Grace Jang said a delay in implementing sales would not affect the date when recreational use of marijuana becomes legal under state law, but an extension on parts of a citizen initiative approved last month is “to make sure the regulatory infrastructure is properly in place,” the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reported.

In comments this week to the Greater Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce, Walker responded to a question about how the administration would approach writing challenging regulations. He said he was told he could delay the process.

“I asked if we could do it for four years,” Walker said, joking. “I can put it off 90 days, but not four years. We’ll probably go the 90-day route. So that’s, you know, where we are.”