Search Results for: dixie elixirs

Dixie Elixirs To Expand Its Brand To California

CALIFORNIA:  Denver-based marijuana edibles maker Dixie Elixirs & Edibles will begin selling some of its products in California on July 1, with some help from a Monterrey County startup.

Dixie’s Toasted Rooster chocolate bar, Awakening and Relaxing Mints and Lifted energy shot will be manufactured and distributed in northern California by Indus Holding Co., which will simultaneously launch its own brand of edibles, called Altai Brands.

Recreational marijuana is not yet legal in California, so the edibles being offered will cater only to medical marijuana patients. Dixie offers both recreational and medical edibles products in Colorado.

Dixies’ Tripp Keber Moves To BR Brands; Co-Founder Chuck Smith Is New CEO

COLORADO:  “Pot Baron” Tripp Keber is turning over the reins of Dixie Brands to co-founder Chuck Smith.  The flamboyant co-founder is relinquishing his CEO role and will “ascend to a new role within Rose Capital affiliate, BR Brands,” according to a company press release.

Dixie Brands is the owner of Dixie Elixirs & Edibles, Therabis, and Aceso Wellness.  The release went on to announce that the company has agreed on terms to partner with Rose Capital, as its ongoing capital and strategic partner. Rose is partnering with Dixie management in a mutually designed market expansion and growth plan and will be providing on-going growth capital, strategic advisory and operational partnership. The new financing has been fully structured and is contingent on final documentation and necessary Dixie shareholder and Rose investment committee approvals. The Rose and Dixie partnership is underpinned by the same vision and thesis for the future of cannabis consumer packaged goods (“CPG”) and the need for best-in-class, responsible, consistent and dependable cannabis CPG manufacturers. This partnership reflects the marriage of the best-in-class product branding, brand awareness, and footprint of Dixie Brands with the best-in-class financial and operational expertise of Rose Capital and their strategic relationships.

As part of the broader strategic partnership, Tripp Keber, Dixie’s current President and CEO, will be joining the team at BR Brands, where he will lead brand partnership / acquisition initiatives. BR Brands will leverage Keber’s extensive network, entrepreneurial background and expansive knowledge of the North American legal cannabis industry to identify, incubate and integrate the strong brands and operators into the BR Brands ecosystem. With Keber’s move, Dixie’s Co-Founder and current Chief Operating Officer, Chuck Smith, will assume the role of President and CEO of Dixie Brands, Inc.

“Today’s announcements are further validation of the brand strength and national recognition we have developed with Dixie,“ said Chuck Smith, President and CEO of Dixie Brands, Inc. “Our partnership with Rose Capital is the exact catalyst we need to take Dixie’s best-in-class product branding, market position, and existing footprint to drive the explosive growth that Dixie is poised to capture.”

“On both a personal, and professional level, I am so honored to be part of this new partnership in this industry,” said Tripp Keber. “Although I am embarking on a new journey with BR Brands, it is truly just an extension of the vision that I saw for Dixie, and the industry, when I established Dixie with my partner and friend, Chuck Smith. I am eager to continue driving the evolution of the Cannabis market forward with BR Brands. I am able to take on this new venture because of the solid position Dixie is in, to execute our explosive growth strategy in 2018 with the leadership of Chuck and the great team of dedicated professionals at Dixie. There is much more to come for both BR Brands and Dixie and I am excited to be able to help shape the future of both.”

 

New Report: U.S. CBD Sales to Reach $2.1B by 2020 With $450M From Hemp Industry

COLORADO: The Hemp Business Journal (HBJ), the hemp industry’s authority on big data and market intelligence, has released The CBD Reportshowing cannabidiol as one of the fastest growing market categories in the U.S. hemp and legal marijuana industries with a compound annual growth rate of 59%.

Partnering with market leading consumer data experts SPINS and BDS Analytics, market modeling experts and hemp insiders with years of experience and sales data, Hemp Business Journal estimates the total U.S. CBD market will grow to a $2.1 Billion market in consumer sales by 2020 with $450 million of those sales coming from hemp based sources. Projections to date for 2016 indicate the hemp-derived CBD market is poised to grow to $115 million by the end of the year.

The hemp-derived CBD market grew from a market that was barely noticeable a few years ago to $90 million in 2015 for consumer sales of CBD products. Hemp Business Journal shows another $112 million of marijuana-derived CBD products were sold through dispensaries in 2015, for a total CBD market size of $202 million in 2015 across all hemp and legal marijuana markets.

The CBD Report is the first comprehensive market overview to define and analyze the acceleration of the emerging CBD market category. The report features the first ever analysis across consumer sales in seven consumer channels including Dispensaries, Natural and Specialty Retail, Mass Market, Practitioner, Internet, Smoke/Head Shops and Pharmaceuticals. Until now, no other market report has combined analysis of hemp and legal marijuana consumer sales to show a cumulative view of where the broader cannabis industry is trending.

The CBD Report also includes an investment guide and coverage of market leading companies including GW Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ: GWPH), Insys Therapeutics, CV Sciences (OTCQB: CVSI), Bluebird Botanicals, Atalo Holdings, CW Hemp, O.pen Vape, Dixie Elixirs and more.

“The CBD Report is the culmination of more than a year of focused market research. We’ve been to Israel, Europe, Canada and to farms, labs and retailers across the U.S. to cover the hemp industry. By analyzing consumer sales in the hemp and marijuana industries, we’ve provided the first view to investors, executives and regulators on what’s really happening with CBD, the hottest category in the broader multi-billion dollar cannabis industry,” said Hemp Business Journal Founder and Publisher, Sean Murphy.

Highlights From The National Cannabis Summit in Denver

COLORADO: The first National Cannabis Summit, the inaugural show from MJ Conferences’ Bruce and Andy Passen, was held October 12-13th at the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Denver, Colorado.

Approximately 500 Cannabis Industry Professionals gathered for the first-time trade event, most to attend an impressive lineup of panelists and speakers, including: Andrew Freeman, Director of Marijuana Coordination for the State of Colorado; Dixie Elixirs CEO Tripp Keber; Privateer Holdings founder Brendan Kennedy; Paul Campbell, Leafly; Nurse Heather Manus; 420 Investor Alan Brochstein; Dr. Sue Sisley, and the MJBA’s David Rheins.

Event Producers Bruce and Andy Passen

Event Producers, MJ Conferences’ Bruce and Andy Passen

Marijuana Channel One, MJNewsNetwork.com’s sister b2b video network on YouTube published by the Marijuana Business Association (MJBA), was there to cover the industry happening, and compiled the following photo slideshow of the event:

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CVwp9ux_on8&w=420&h=315]

Marijuana Channel One travels to the top cannabis industry events and happenings.

Turn On. Tune In. Catch the Buzz! If you have #MJNews to share, please drop us a note: info@mjba.net.

San Francisco’s First Marijuana ‘Baked Sale’ Shows That Edibles Are The Next Multimillion-Dollar Food Industry

CALIFORNIA:  Last weekend, thousands from the Bay Area poured into the outdoor SoMa StrEAT Food Park for the Get Baked Sale, the first annual food rally for marijuana edibles enthusiasts.

Cannabis is only legal for medicinal use in California, though momentum is growing among supporters who seek to legalize its recreational use in a 2016 ballot initiative. Attendees at the fair had to present a state-authorized medical marijuana identification card at the door and pay $20 in order to enter.

Not unlike most smorgasbords, booths (selling mind-altering treats) lined the urban park. Some vendors lured people over with gimmicks, like free vape pens and a lottery wheel to win a THC-laced doughnut. We saw the usual suspects, pot brownies and cookies, and more daring confections, such as cannabis-infused fortune cookies, mini doughnuts, and ice cream. The crowd was unsurprisingly chill.

 

 

How To Brand, Market, And Sell Marijuana Without Breaking The Law

COLORADO:  Earlier this year, Dixie Elixirs & Edibles, perhaps Colorado’s best-known cannabis brand, took its THC-infused drinks off the market. It had no choice.

That’s because a couple of weeks later, on February 1, new packaging regulations for recreational marijuana edibles went into effect in the state and the screw top aluminum bottles were no longer compliant.

The new rules require that drinkable cannabis products come in childproof, resealable packaging. Dixie also had to come with a way to measure out a single dose, like the tiny plastic cup on a bottle of cough syrup.

Dixie enlisted a Colorado packaging company called TricorBraun to design a new bottle that met all the specs, but by the time the new bottles reached dispensary shelves last week, the company had lost 90 days of selling its flagship product.

A Look At Legalizing Marijuana In The US

Nearly half of all states have legalized medical marijuana, with Colorado and Washington serving as bellwethers for recreational use, and the US is amid an end to a prohibition on par with that of alcohol. But just how will the Green Rush grow? And why is it attracting some surprising advocates among doctors, entrepreneurs, politicians, attorneys, and businesspeople?

Weed. Ganja. Marijuana. Pot. During the opening session of the heady 2014 Aspen Ideas Festival held in June of this year, references to the potent plant were the keynote kicker. An intellectual with enviable wit, David G. Bradley, owner of the Atlantic Media Company, delivered an opening monologue that imagined some 250, type-A festival speakers high on Colorado cannabis, enlivening a crowd of CEOs, politicians, doctors, and thinkers with scenarios such as former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton pulling her tempted husband into a car with a reference to her memoir, “We’re making hard choices, Bill.”

But all jokes aside, this international platform—which eventually staged a very serious conversation on marijuana between Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper and Katie Couric—is illustrative of an escalating national debate embracing medical marijuana and its rapid-fire industry growth. And for many close to the cause, weed is no laughing matter, posing hard choices indeed.

Pot chatter is pervasive throughout the US, whether at dinner parties or on the floor of Congress. In Atlanta, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, a practicing neurosurgeon and CNN’s chief medical correspondent, who was once vocally anti-pot, passionately discusses the benefits of cannabis in his second documentary film, Weed 2: Cannabis Madness. In Nevada, State Senator Tick Segerblom and Congresswoman Dina Titus are championing bills that favor post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) medical marijuana research and protect the rights of legal users. In Los Angeles, former talk-show host and celebrity Ricki Lake is producing a new documentary, Weed the People, which follows cancer-stricken children and the use of cannabis as medicine. In Denver, Tripp Keber, founder and CEO of Dixie Elixirs and Edibles, is launching his latest edible product, Dixie One. And just a 20-minute drive from Keber’s new 40,000-square-foot Colorado headquarters, Governor Hickenlooper is repeatedly quoted as stating that we are in the midst of one of the “great social experiments of the 21st century.”

Marijuana Money Is Pot Of Trouble For Banks

COLORADO:  During a visit to the Dixie Elixirs & Edibles plant in Denver last summer, I saw the machines the company uses to produce cannabis concentrates, the kitchen where it makes marijuana-infused chocolates, and the bottling line for its THC-spiked sodas. Toward the end of the tour, I had a semi-serious question for the company’s CEO, Tripp Keber: “Where do you keep your piles of money?”

Keber laughed but quickly turned serious. “We actually have strong banking relationships,” he said. “We don’t talk about them. Asking someone about their banking is like asking them what they wear to bed at night. It’s an intensely personal question, even within the industry.” You can begin to understand why banking is such a touchy subject for the newly legal cannabusinesses in Colorado and Washington (as well as growers and dispensaries in the 21 states that allow medical but not recreational use of marijuana) if you consider the federal laws a financial institution violates when it does business with a state-licensed company like Keber’s.

“By providing [a] loan and placing the proceeds in [a] checking account, the institution would be conspiring to distribute marijuana,” writes University of Alabama law professor Julie Andersen Hill in a paper she presented at aconference on marijuana and federalism last week. “By facilitating customers’ credit card payments, the institution would be aiding and abetting the distribution of marijuana. And by knowingly accepting deposits consisting of revenue from the sale of marijuana, the institution may be acting as an accessory after the fact.”

That is not the end of the possible charges. “A financial institution that knowingly processes transactions for marijuana-related businesses commits the crime of money laundering,” Hill notes. Failure to meet the detailed monitoring and reporting requirements of the humorously named Bank Secrecy Act (BSA), which requires financial institutions to keep an eye out for suspicious activity, also can be treated as a felony.

 

Marijuana-Laced Treats Leave Colorado Jonesing For Food-Safety Rules

COLORADO: Where there’s pot, there’s pot brownies. But how do you make sure those high-inducing sweets are safe to eat?

Colorado regulators are wrestling with that question now that the state has legalized recreational marijuana. From sodas and truffles to granola bars and butter, food products infused with THC – the chemical in marijuana that gives you a high — are already for sale.

The problem? Marijuana is still illegal under federal law. And that means the existing food safety system, which relies heavily on support from federal agencies, can’t ensure that marijuana-infused foods are safe.

Purveyors of pot-laced foods say they want the regulation.

“We are under a microscope,” says Christie Lunsford, marketing and education director for Dixie Elixirs, a manufacturer of foods infused with THC. ” [Read more…]

Cannabis Industry Gather To Place Bets At Emerald Downs Dinner

WASHINGTON: Emerald Downs seemed like the perfect place to bet your money on the cannabis race. Companies from all over the globe came to witness history in the making on a perfect Seattle day. The wind and rain pelted convention goers like Tripp Keber from Dixie Elixirs in Colorado, who told MJNN that this was his sixth trip to Washington and he’s not seen a sunny day yet.

Convention goers were betting their $125 dinner ticket will make them a contender in the green rush. They networked in the hallways and under the bright lights of the betting screens. Badge-wearing business people collected their green wrist bands for free happy hour drink tickets. [Read more…]