Search Results for: Anchorage Assembly

Assembly Kills Proposal To Ban Marijuana Sales In Anchorage, Alaska

ALASKA: An ordinance that would have banned commercial marijuana in Anchorage failed after four hours of public testimony and debate in Assembly chambers Tuesday night.

The Assembly voted 9-2 just after 10 p.m. to kill the measure. Only members Amy Demboski and Paul Honeman supported the measure.  Demboski introduced the proposal last month, hoping the city would take a “wait and see approach” as state lawmakers craft marijuana regulations.

But several Assembly members expressed concern that a ban would disconnect them from conversations regarding marijuana regulations at the state level.  “I’m fearful the message on ‘opt out’ will send key legislators in Anchorage to the sidelines,” said Assemblyman Bill Starr. “That will make my work harder.”

Demboski said her goal in bringing the legislation forward was not to stifle pot in Anchorage, but to begin to move the conversation forward on big topics dealing with the substance, including potential issues at the federal level. She noted it will especially be important to engage with Alaska’s congressional delegation on how to mitigate potential federal impacts.

“It’s bringing the conversation forward,” Demboski said.

Proposed Business Ban Reignites Marijuana Debate In Anchorage

ALASKA:  Residents will get a chance to testify Tuesday on whether the Anchorage Assembly should vote to ban commercial marijuana facilities in Alaska’s largest city.

The ordinance, introduced by Eagle River Assembly member Amy Demboski, has caused supporters and opponents of the initiative, just weeks past the election, to regroup around the measure.

Demboski’s ordinance, if approved by the Assembly, would allow the city to accept the “opt out” provision of Ballot Measure 2, the initiative legalizing recreational marijuana in Alaska.

Demboski has said she would like to see the city take a “wait and see” approach to the rule-making process. In an interview last month, she said the municipality should take its time and watch what comes out of the Legislature and the nine-month marijuana rule-making process that will begin in February, when the initiative goes into effect.

 

 

Weighing Enforcement And Black Market, City Introduces Marijuana Tax

ALASKA: The Anchorage Assembly is introducing a measure to tax marijuana when sales become legal in the year ahead. The proposal hinges, however, on voter approval in April.

Though it’s still several steps away, Assembly members are proposing to eventually tax marijuana retail sales at five percent.

Ernie Hall chairs the committee that’s been looking at how to tax cannabis products within the municipality, and said the figure is a preliminary estimate of what the city will need to collect in order to pay for the licensing and enforcement costs that come along with opening new businesses.

“This is drafted where if we start at five and we find out we’re not covering the expense of this industry we can adjust it two percent at a time over a number of years,” Hall explained after the committee meeting adjourned Thursday evening. The Assembly would only be able to change the percentage taxed every two years.

Alaska Police Raid Former TV Anchor Charlo Greene’s Marijuana Dispensary

ALASKA:  Anchorage police served search warrants at marijuana activist Charlo Greene’s Alaska Cannabis Club after receiving reports of illegal marijuana sales.

The police took marijuana and impounded a Dodge Dakota and a Jeep Liberty on Friday, KTUU reported.

Greene is a former television reporter who gained notoriety when she quit her job on live TV in September with an expletive and announced she’s becoming an advocate to legalize the recreational use of marijuana in Alaska.

Greene, whose legal name is Charlene Egbe, told KTVA the club is a medical marijuana dispensary. “We don’t sell any recreational marijuana. We don’t sell any medical marijuana. This is a place for cardholders to come and share their own cannabis,” she said.

 

Oregon Lawmaker Says Marijuana Candy Overdose Shows State Needs To Move Slowly On Recreational Pot

OREGON:  A key lawmaker says a marijuana overdose in an Oregon resort town shows the need to go slowly on making pot-infused candies, cookies and other edibles available to the public.

Sen. Ginny Burdick, a Portland Democrat who co-chairs a committee working on implementing the ballot measure approved last fall that legalized recreational marijuana. She said Wednesday she’s not willing to allow the sale of marijuana edibles until regulators figure out how to control potency and keep them away from kids.

“I don’t think we are in a position to approve any kind of edibles right now,” Burdick said. “We have to figure out a way to package them, label them, and make sure people understand the dosage.”

Commercial pot sales are not expected to start until late 2016, though Oregonians can legally possess up to a half pound of marijuana at home starting in July.

 

Despite Legal Issues, Alaska Marijuana Delivery Service Is Open For Business

ALASKA:  At least one marijuana delivery service is openly selling pot in Southcentral Alaska, more than a month before the ballot initiative that legalized recreational marijuana use in the state officially goes into effect.

“Technically we are acting [rogue] … but look forward to being legal soon,” reads the website of Discreet Deliveries, which offers to drop off up to an ounce of marijuana to paying customers in Anchorage and the Matanuska Valley.

Discreet Deliveries owner Rocky Burns, a 37-year-old former real estate agent from Wasilla, seems to be taking the risks in stride.

But state agencies on Monday warned that such a cavalier approach is dangerous.